Stress bragging may make you seem less competent, less likable at work

While work is occasionally stressful for everyone, some people wear stress as a badge of honor. They’re taking one for the team and want to tell you all about it. New research from the University of Georgia Terry College of Business found people who brag about their stress levels are seen as less competent and less likable by their co-workers.

Study finds that AI benefits workers more than bosses

Johns Hopkins Carey Business School Researchers Gordon Gao and Ritu Agarwal published a new report on Wednesday, October 11 that explores how knowledge workers (workers whose main capital is knowledge) with different levels and types of experience team with AI for productivity gains.   The primary findings…

Meet your new AI colleague; Indiana University Kelley School of Business professor studies working with digital humans

With rapid progress in computer graphics and advancements in artificial intelligence, human faces are now being put on chat bots and other computer-based interfaces with customers, employees, and others. Coined “digital humans,” they mimic people as they are used as sales assistants, corporate trainers and even social media influencers

Workplace Negotiation Workshop March 9-10 in Washington, D.C.

UMD Smith faculty experts Vijaya Venkataramani and Rellie Derfler-Rozin will lead participants through experiential exercises and real-life simulations covering a broad spectrum of workplace negotiation situations in a workshop-based professional certificate course.

GW Expert Available: Returning to Work Plays Important Role in Revitalizing Downtowns

Despite more and more companies issuing return to work mandates, many employees are still working from home and some experts worry how those policies are impacting urban economies. This week, Washington D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser called on the Biden administration to end teleworking policies for federal employees, asking the White House…

Making science more accessible to people with disabilities

The pandemic prompted workplace changes that proved beneficial to people with disabilities in science, technology, engineering, math and medicine (STEMM), but there’s fear that these accommodations will be rolled back. With International Day of Persons with Disabilities taking place on Dec. 3, a research team including faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York is calling for ways to make work in STEMM more accessible.

Demand for remote work remains high, despite companies rolling back virtual work arrangements

More job seekers are applying for remote positions, despite more companies choosing to bring their workers back into the office and roll back virtual work arrangements. According to a report by The Washington Post, fifty percent of job applications submitted on LinkedIn…

APA poll shows employees plan to seek workplaces with mental health supports

Eight in 10 U.S. workers say that how employers support their employees’ mental health will be an important consideration when they seek future job opportunities, while 71% believe their employer is more concerned about the mental health of employees now than in the past, according to a survey from the American Psychological Association.

NCCN Policy Summit Speakers Say Flexibility in Supporting and Accommodating Cancer Patients and Caregivers Helps Workplaces Thrive

The National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) convened an oncology policy summit in Washington D.C. on building a workplace that includes support for people with cancer and their caregivers. The program, which also featured a virtual attendance option, examined how workplace norms and expectations have changed in recent years, particularly since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Gratitude Expressions Between Co-Workers Improve Cardiovascular Responses to Stress

A study from the University of California San Diego’s Rady School of Management finds teammates who thanked each other before performing a high-stress task had a better cardiovascular response compared to teams who did not express gratitude. The enhanced cardiovascular response leads to increased concentration, more confidence, allowing individuals to give their peak performance.

ASU health economist studies effects of mental illness disclosure in the workplace

A person with a serious mental illness must confront the difficult decision of whether to reveal their disorder in their workplace. Disclosing their diagnosis might create stigma, but it could also mean additional support. Adding to the delicate balancing act…

Star employees get most of the credit and blame while collaborating with non-stars

Star employees often get most of the credit when things go right, but also shoulder most of the blame when things go wrong, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York.

On the one-year anniversary of the pandemic in the U.S., experts @JohnsHopkins can speak about the implications of WFH and SchoolFH on the future of work and education.

The United States is approaching the one-year anniversary of the pandemic forcing the closure of offices and schools across the country, launching millions of Americans into remote work and schooling. Johns Hopkins University experts who have been studying the short…

Arizona State University releases first comprehensive survey on how companies are protecting their employees from COVID-19

A new global business survey conducted by the College of Health Solutions at Arizona State University (ASU) and the World Economic Forum (WEF), with support from The Rockefeller Foundation, finds that less than 20% of employers report testing their workers for COVID-19, and 35% have permanently reduced their workforce. The survey, which was completed by 1,125 employers from 29 countries with the majority over a period of six weeks, September to October, found that for companies with employees onsite at the workplace, many are taking some steps to reduce the risk of spreading the virus. Nearly three-fourths (74%) of these companies report they require masks for their employees, and nearly 80% make masks and hand sanitizer available.

Arizona State University and World Economic Forum, with support from The Rockefeller Foundation, announce COVID-19 Diagnostics Commons to help companies get back to work

To help companies safely move their employees back to the workplace, Arizona State University’s College of Health Solutions and the World Economic Forum, with support from The Rockefeller Foundation, announced today the COVID-19 Diagnostics Commons — an interactive hub for the global community to access the very latest information about testing options and to share knowledge and practices for safely bringing back and keeping employees in the workplace during the COVID-19 era.

Supreme Court just the beginning for LGBTQ workplace equality

On Monday, the Supreme Court issued a decision in the case Bostock v. Clayton County, finding it illegal for employers to discriminate against LGBTQ workers. Katrina Nobles is the Director of Conflict Programs at Cornell University’s School of Industrial and…

Work Habits of Highly Effective Teams: Insight for Businesses Operating or Reopening Amid Coronavirus

Maryland Smith workplace expert Cynthia Kay Stevens gives advice that organizations can use to better support their teams as they take on complex problems including those posed by operating or reopening amid restrictions imposed by COVID-19.

Ohio State Experts Offer Tips For Healthy Transition To Post-COVID-19 Workplace

Experts at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center and The Ohio State University College of Nursing say it’s important to take precautions to avoid infection, but also to deal with the stress of transitioning back to their offices or businesses after an extended period of isolation during COVID-19.

Coronavirus and the Workplace: Rutgers Experts Available for Interview

PISCATAWAY, N.J. (March 6, 2020) – The coronavirus/COVID-19 outbreak is raising questions about internal communications, telecommuting, sick leave, and other policies. Workplace experts in the Rutgers School of Management and Labor Relations are available for interview on an ongoing basis…

Black workers’ status in a company informs perceptions of workplace racial discrimination

“Research shows that black individuals encounter an enormous amount of racial discrimination in the workplace, including exclusion from critical social networks, wage disparities and hiring disadvantages,” said Harvey Wingfield, co-author of the study “Getting In, Getting Hired, Getting Sideways Looks: Organizational Hierarchy and Perceptions of Racial Discrimination,” published Jan.