Star employees get most of the credit and blame while collaborating with non-stars

Star employees often get most of the credit when things go right, but also shoulder most of the blame when things go wrong, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York.

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Entrepreneurs benefit more from emotional intelligence than other competencies, such as IQ

Running a successful business has its challenges, but the COVID-19 pandemic has required many owners to pivot and look for new ways to operate profitably while keeping employees and consumers safe. Research from the Indiana University Kelley School of Business found that emotional intelligence – the ability to understand, use and manage emotions to relieve stress – may be more vital to a business’ survival than previously thought.

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The Feeling Economy: How AI is Creating the Era of Empathy

As machines are trained to “think,” many tasks that previously required human intelligence are becoming automated through artificial intelligence. However, human workers have a competitive advantage: It is more difficult to automate emotional intelligence.

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Athletes don’t benefit from relying on a coach for too long

Athletes increasingly relying on a coach over the course of a season may be a sign that they aren’t progressing in their development, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York.

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Some employees more likely to adhere to information security policies than others

Information security policies (ISP) that are not grounded in the realities of an employee’s work responsibilities and priorities exposes organizations to higher risk for data breaches, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York.

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Rutgers Expert Can Discuss Earthwise Lawn and Landscape Care, Farming

New Brunswick, N.J. (June 15, 2020) – Rutgers University–New Brunswick Professor William T. Hlubik is available for interviews on environmentally

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With transition to remote work environment, business leaders need to spend more time fostering engagement with employees

As working from home becomes more prevalent, business leaders need to focus on connecting with their employees both one-on-one and

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Nonprofits benefit from having women on executive board

In the non-profit sector, women comprise the majority of nonprofit employees, while they are still the minority on boards. Having a substantial number of women on boards benefits nonprofits, according to a research team including faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York.

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Researchers Create New Tools for Disaster Response Volunteers

In the wake of a disaster, many people want to help. Researchers from North Carolina State University and the University of Alabama have developed tools to help emergency response and relief managers coordinate volunteer efforts in order to do the most good.

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Leading Mindfully: COVID-19 and the Big Human Pivot, Part I

What’s novel about COVID-19 isn’t just the coronavirus. It’s the sheer scale and depth of The Big Human Pivot that this tiny infectious particle has triggered. In unprecedented times, what can you do to lead mindfully through it? In this series, Lili Powell introduces a Leading Mindfully strategy: “see it, name it, tame it and reclaim it.”

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A Bite Out of Apple: What Happens If You Lose Strategic Talent?

When Apple’s longtime design guru Jony Ive announced that he’d be starting his own agency, it meant major change. The situation serves as a case in point for any organization whose success rests on strategic human capital: If strategy is intrinsically tied to talent, how does a firm support that talent or proceed if that talent disengages?

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3 Keys to Navigating Digital Disruption: The Case of a Luxury Retailer

What does it take to transform? What if the challenges are huge: globalization, economic uncertainty, technological disruption, market innovations, changes in customer expectations, new competition — maybe all of the above? Here’s how luxury goods distributor and retailer The Chalhoub Group is responding to a changing world.

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Publicly sharing a goal could help you persist after hitting failure

Publicly sharing a goal may help you persist after hitting a failure, but only if you care about what others think of you, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York.

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Thunderbird’s Professor Teagarden: Phase 1 trade agreement with China only ends first round of long trade war, benefits some industries more than others.

Mary Teagarden is recognized worldwide in academic, corporate and government sectors for her teaching, executive training, and consulting. Teagarden is professor

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