Studying Metabolic Regulation Through Cellular Properties

During cellular metabolism, enzymes break down and build fats, proteins, energy carriers, and genetic information. These processes happen through a complex network of reactions. Until now, studies to identify specific reactions that regulate the overall flow through a network were too complex to do regularly. Now scientists have developed new methods that combine cutting-edge techniques to predict which enzymes control common biochemical pathways.

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Compound Communicates More than Expected in Microbes

Microbes use chemical signals to exchange information with their plant hosts. These signals initiate symbiotic associations. Scientists believe some of these chemical signals are unique and are specialized for specific purposes or audiences. One example is the compounds called lipo-chitooligosaccharides (LCOs). Researchers previously believed that LCOs are for specific fungi, but new research shows that these compounds are ubiquitous.

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Hunting for Sterile Neutrinos with Quantum Sensors

An international team has performed one of the world’s most sensitive laboratory searches for a hypothetical subatomic particle called the “sterile neutrino.” The novel experiment uses radioactive beryllium-7 atoms created at the TRIUMF facility in Canada. The research team then implants these atoms into sensitive superconductors cooled to near absolute-zero.

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Most young people eager for COVID-19 vaccine, poll shows

As older teens and young adults become eligible for COVID-19 vaccination across the country, and younger teens await their turn, new survey data suggest a strong readiness that has grown since fall. But just as with older generations, a shrinking but still sizable minority of people age 14 to 24 say they’re not willing to get vaccinated, or that their decision will depend on safety.

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ASA Announces Strategic Change to its Meetings Services Model with SmithBucklin Partnership

The American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) today announced a strategic change to its meetings services model by partnering with SmithBucklin, a firm with decades of innovation and excellence in designing and producing association events. ASA will partner with SmithBucklin to deliver its ANESTHESIOLOGY® and Practice Management™ meetings.

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Spanish Professor Applies Bilingual Skills to Immigration Court

Even though Graziela Rondón-Pari, Buffalo State College assistant professor of Spanish, has been in this country legally for decades, she said, she can empathize with the individuals going through the court system. This is why she continues to spend her summers as a court interpreter in Buffalo, New York City, and Baltimore, Maryland.

Now, she is passing along these skills to Buffalo State Spanish majors interested in becoming court interpreters.

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Over 1,200 Coastal Scientists and Managers Engage During Virtual Gulf of Mexico Conference

Today, over 1,200 coastal scientists, managers, and professionals from federal and state agencies, academia, non-profits, and industry came together for a virtual event launching the new Gulf of Mexico Conference (GoMCon). The Gulf of Mexico Alliance hosted this event in partnership with the Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative and Harte Research Institute for Gulf of Mexico Studies.

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BIODIVERSITY RESEARCH INSTITUTE ANNOUNCES NEW CONSULTING DIVISION: BRI ENVIRONMENTAL

Biodiversity Research Institute announces the formation of its new environmental consulting services division—BRI Environmental offering a full suite of services for evaluating and permitting renewable energy development projects, infrastructure projects, marine installations, as well as residential and commercial development.

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Laurie Garrett, Pulitzer Prize-Winning Journalist, Named 2021 Senator Frank R. Lautenberg Award Recipient by the Rutgers School of Public Health

Laurie Garrett, a Pulitzer-Prize-winning journalist, has been named the 2021 Senator Frank R. Lautenberg Awardee by the Rutgers School of Public Health. She will serve as the School’s speaker at their 38th graduation ceremony, which will virtually launch on May 14, 2021.

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Scientists identify potential drug candidates for deadly pediatric leukemia

Scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute have shown that two existing drug candidates—JAK inhibitors and Mepron—hold potential as treatments for a deadly acute myeloid leukemia (AML) subtype that is more common in children. The foundational study, published in the journal Blood, is a first step toward finding effective treatments for the hard-to-treat blood cancer.

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Bacteria May Be the Key To Understanding the Health of Aquatic Ecosystems

In a new project, a research team from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute will build biosensors using bacteria that can sense and communicate levels of nutrients in a body of water with enhanced levels of sensitivity, scalability, and versatility. The effort, supported by a nearly $375,000 grant from the National Science Foundation, is being led by Shayla Sawyer, an associate professor of electrical, computer, and systems engineering at Rensselaer.

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Shape-shifting Ebola virus protein exploits human RNA to change shape

In a new Cell Reports study, researchers at La Jolla Institute for Immunology demonstrate how Ebola virus has found a different way to get things done. The virus encodes only eight proteins but requires dozens of functions in its lifecycle. The new study shows how one of Ebola virus’s key proteins, VP40, uses molecular triggers in the human cell to transform itself into different tools for different jobs.

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From Smoky Skies to a Green Horizon: Scientists Convert Fire-Risk Wood into Biofuel

Reliance on petroleum fuels and raging wildfires: Two separate, large-scale challenges that could be addressed by one scientific breakthrough. Researchers from two national laboratories have collaborated to develop a streamlined and efficient process for converting woody plant matter like forest overgrowth and agricultural waste – material that is currently burned either intentionally or unintentionally – into liquid biofuel.

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GIS technology helps map out how America’s mafia networks were ‘connected’

A team of researchers used geographic information systems — a collection of tools for geographic mapping and analysis of the Earth and society — and data from a government database on mafia ties during the 1960s, to examine how these networks were built, maintained and grown. The researchers said that this spatial social networks study offers a unique look at the mafia’s loosely affiliated criminal groups. Often called families, these groups were connected — internally and externally — to maintain a balance between security and effectiveness, referred to as the efficiency-security tradeoff.

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Research to Prevent Blindness and The Glaucoma Foundation Offer Critical Funding for Early-Career Vision Scientists

Research to Prevent Blindness and The Glaucoma Foundation are pleased to announce a new round of grants, the Career Advancement Awards (CAAs), that support early-career researchers as they seek new knowledge related to eye diseases.

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Biomarker Could Help Identify Difficult-to-Diagnose Kidney Cancer Subtype

High expression levels of the gene TRIM63 can serve as an accurate and sensitive biomarker of a subtype of kidney cancer known as microphthalmia-associated transcription factor family aberration-associated renal cell carcinomas — or MiTF renal cell carcinoma.

It’s important to distinguish MiTF from other subtypes of kidney cancers — clear cell, papillary and chromophobe — because these tumors may not respond well to standard, front-line treatments and may respond better to other approaches.

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