Down on Vitamin D? It could be the cause of chronic inflammation

World-first genetic research from the University of South Australia shows a direct link between low levels of vitamin D and high levels of inflammation, providing an important biomarker to identify people at higher risk of or severity of chronic illnesses with an inflammatory component.

UChicago Medicine breaks ground on $121M multispecialty care facility in Crown Point, Indiana

The University of Chicago Medicine broke ground on a new two-story, 130,000-square-foot multispecialty care center and micro-hospital in Northwest Indiana for what will be the academic health system’s largest off-site facility and its first freestanding building in Indiana. The $121 million state-of-the-art care center, at I-65 and 109th Avenue in Crown Point, is expected to open in spring of 2024.

Machine Learning Reveals Hidden Components of X-Ray Pulses

Ultrafast pulses from X-ray lasers reveal how atoms move at femtosecond timescales, but measuring the properties of the pulses is challenging. A new approach trains neural networks to analyze the pulses. Starting from low-resolution measurements, the neural networks reveal finer details with each pulse, and they can analyze pulses millions of times faster than previous methods.

As the country experiences record high temperatures, a University of Miami dermatologist explains why sweat is a natural phenomenon that we often take for granted but that it is crucial for our bodies to remain healthy.

Dr. Scott Elman is a Harvard-trained dermatologist in the Dr. Phillip Frost Department of Dermatology and Cutaneous Surgery at the University of Miami Health System. Why do we sweat? (miami.edu) Dr. Scott Elman, MD – Miami, FL – Dermatology –…

Michigan Medicine receives grant recognizing it as a top U.S. program for spinal cord injury

Michigan Medicine’s Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation received a federal research grant for spinal cord injury – reflecting its comprehensive care for patients with SCI and signifying the program as a national leader in the field. Michigan Medicine rejoins the Spinal Cord Injury Model System program, a network of health systems supported by the National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research.

New study calculates retreat of glacier edges in Alaska’s Kenai Fjords National Park

A new study measured 38 years of change for glaciers in Kenai Fjords National Park, which lies south of Anchorage, and found that 13 of 19 glaciers show substantial retreat, four are relatively stable, and two have advanced. It also finds trends in which glacier types are disappearing fastest.

WVU toxicologist calls passage of burn pit bill ‘critical step in improving veteran health’

A West Virginia University researcher with expertise in air pollution and inhalation exposures is available to discuss burn pits following this week’s U.S. Senate passage of a bill expanding health care benefits for veterans who developed illnesses after being exposed…

ابتكارات مايو كلينك: بحثٌ في طليعة الطيران الأمريكي في وقت انتصار الحرب العالمية الثانية

إذا كنتم قد شاهدتم فيلم “توب غان: مافريك”، فقد رأيتم صورةً خياليةً لطيارين حربيين يقومون بمناورات جوية مذهلة في ظروف صعبة جداً تتحدّى قوة الجاذبية. لذلك، نشارككم الدور الذي لعبته مايو كلينك في مساعدة الطيارين الأمريكيين على الوصول إلى تلك الارتفاعات في الحرب العالمية الثانية.

Vegans who lift weights may have stronger bones than other people on a plant-based diet

People on a plant-based diet who do strength training as opposed to other forms of exercise such as biking or swimming may have stronger bones than other people on a vegan diet, according to new research published in the Endocrine Society’s Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

Children and teens getting spinal surgery don’t need so many opioids, study suggests

Children and teens with scoliosis undergoing spinal fusion can be prescribed fewer opioids while still receiving adequate pain control after surgery, a new study finds. Patients receiving preoperative education on the risks of opioids and the importance of nonopioid pain management options consumed fewer opioids after surgery.

AACN Study Underscores Pandemic Damage and the Benefits of Healthy Work Environments

Results from the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses’ national survey of 9,000-plus nurses underscore the ongoing impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on nurses and the benefits of creating healthy work environments to support nurse staffing, retention and optimal patient care.

Pairing imaging, AI may improve colon cancer screening, diagnosis

A research team from the lab of Quing Zhu, the Edwin H. Murty Professor of Engineering  in the Department of Biomedical Engineering at the McKelvey School of Engineering at Washington University in St. Louis, has combined optical coherence tomography (OCT) and machine learning to develop a colorectal cancer imaging tool that may one day improve the traditional endoscopy currently used by doctors.

When in doubt never fear, Al is here

Partial-observation mazes in virtual reality have been used to find that they can decode from brain activity the subjects’ abilities to predict their positions and scenes within the maze, as well as the degree of confidence in their predictions. Brain activity is measured via functional magnetic resonance imaging, or fMRI, while subjects are engaged in a VR maze game. Despite having no knowledge of the final destination, subjects appear to be able to use their predictions and map memory to help estimate their positions in the maze and choose the right way to proceed.

Standing Up to Stage 4 Breast Cancer

Holly Hammond faced one of the toughest-imaginable breast cancer scenarios. Her cancer was already advanced and had spread to her liver and lymph nodes when she discovered a tumor on her right breast. The tumor was negative for all of the markers that respond to targeted therapies for cancer treatment. She was also positive for the genes that mark her as especially prone to breast cancer.

Genetics May Predict Bladder Cancer Immunotherapy Response

Investigators from Cedars-Sinai Cancer have identified genetic signatures that could predict whether tumors in patients with bladder and other cancers will respond to immunotherapy. Their results, published today in the peer-reviewed Journal of the National Cancer Institute, could one day help guide clinicians to the most effective treatments for cancer patients.