On the internet, nobody knows you’re a dog – or a fake Russian Twitter account

This study investigates how successful Russian Internet Research Agency Twitter accounts built the followings that were central to their disinformation campaigns around the 2016 US presidential election. Many legacy media outlets played an unwitting role in the growth, according to the findings.

LAST CALL to enter the MORE Awards!

The AAOS invites journalists and print, online and broadcast news outlets to submit content to be considered for the 2021 Media Orthopaedic Reporting Excellence (MORE) Awards. Established in 2006, the MORE Awards is a prestigious honor in musculoskeletal healthcare journalism in the United States. Deadline for entry is Friday, January 22! Entry is FREE.

Who’s to Blame? How the Media Has Shaped Public Understanding of the COVID-19 Pandemic

The COVID-19 pandemic in the U.S. has been characterized by rapidly changing information, a high degree of uncertainty, and conflicting information about transmission, vulnerability and mitigation methods. Several studies focused on public perceptions of the pandemic and the impact of media will be presented during two sessions on December 15, from 2:30-4:00 during the Society for Risk Analysis virtual Annual Meeting, December 13-17, 2020.

Study links rising stress, depression in U.S. to pandemic-related losses, media consumption

Irvine, Calif., Sept. 18, 2020 – Experiencing multiple stressors triggered by the COVID-19 pandemic – such as unemployment – and COVID-19-related media consumption are directly linked to rising acute stress and depressive symptoms across the U.S., according to a groundbreaking University of California, Irvine study. The report appears in Science Advances, published by the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Reporting on Local Health Systems

Susan Dentzer, health-care analyst, commentator, journalist, and senior policy fellow at the Duke-Margolis Center for Health Policy, discusses local health systems, including how they are coping with the COVID-19 pandemic and best practices for reporting on the subject. Carla Anne Robbins, CFR adjunct senior fellow and former deputy editorial page editor at the New York Times, hosts the webinar.

Repeated novel coronavirus media exposure may be linked to psychological distress

Irvine, Calif., March 23, 2020 – While government officials and news organizations work to communicate critical risk assessments and recommendations to the public during a health crisis such as the new coronavirus pandemic, a related threat may be emerging, according to researchers at the University of California, Irvine: psychological distress resulting from repeated media exposure to the crisis.

Study: Social Studies Teachers Not “Above the Fray” in Linking Their Political Views to How They Assess News Source Credibility

At a time when there’s been a sharp uptick in partisan critiques of the credibility of the news media and growing concern among educators about student media literacy, a new study finds a strong connection between high school social studies teachers’ political ideology and how credible they find various mainstream news outlets.

Notre Dame experts available to comment on 2020 Presidential Election

Notre Dame scholars are available to comment on issues related to race and representation, religion and politics, immigration, economy, media and democracy, and women and politics.  For a list of available experts, visit https://news.nd.edu/our-experts/topic-2020-election/ Original post https://alertarticles.info

The new monopolies: reining in big tech

The University of Chicago Booth School of Business Stigler Center Committee on Digital Platforms today released its first report delivering eight policy recommendations on how to rein in Big Tech, including creating a new Digital Authority.
The independent and non-partisan Committee – composed of more than 30 highly-respected academics, policymakers, and experts – spent more than a year studying in-depth how digital platforms such as Google and Facebook impact our economy and antitrust laws, data protection, the political system and the news media industry.

The new monopolies: reining in big tech

The University of Chicago Booth School of Business Stigler Center Committee on Digital Platforms today released its first report delivering eight policy recommendations on how to rein in Big Tech, including creating a new Digital Authority.
The independent and non-partisan Committee – composed of more than 30 highly-respected academics, policymakers, and experts – spent more than a year studying in-depth how digital platforms such as Google and Facebook impact our economy and antitrust laws, data protection, the political system and the news media industry.