Most Californians unaware of law to prevent gun violence but would support using it

A new study shows that two-thirds of Californians don’t know about a law designed to prevent a person at risk of hurting themselves or others from possessing or purchasing firearms or ammunition. More than 80% of survey participants were supportive once they read about this law.

One Year After George Floyd’s Death: Californians are Conflicted on Police Reform

Cal State Fullerton criminal justice professor Christine Gardiner’s new report about Californians’ perceptions of police and police reform offers an analysis of the poll conducted within months of Floyd’s death. The study shows Californians are inconsistent in how they feel…

Arizona State University Law Enforcement Experts Available for Interviews on Community-police Relationship

Authoritative, well-researched perspectives on police use of force and law enforcement’s relationship with the communities they serve are available from members of the faculty of the highly respected School of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Arizona State University as the…

Policing Expert Available to Discuss Derek Chauvin Verdict, Police Policy and Californians’ Views on Police Reform

Christine Gardiner, professor of criminal justice at California State University, Fullerton, is available to discuss the verdict of the Derek Chauvin trial, policing policy, and results from a California public opinion poll conducted in August of 2020, within months of…

FAQs Regarding the Police Response to the Storming of the U.S. Capitol from experts at Arizona State University

On Jan. 6, 2021, the U.S. Capitol was stormed in a manner not seen since the War of 1812. To many, the ease of the assault was shocking, highlighting differences in how law enforcement has approached other protests. Faculty from Arizona State University’s School of Criminology and Criminal Justice are helping to answer some of the questions that Americans understandably have about the incident.

Police officers face multifaceted, compounding stressors that can lead to adverse events during high-stress calls

Repeated exposure to high-stress calls for service and ongoing exposure to stress without relief were two of the contributing factors that could lead law enforcement officers to become susceptible to adverse events while performing their duties, according to a new study published in BMC Public Health by researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth).

Law Professor Calls for End to Police Detaining People on the Ground

The video of a Black woman and four crying young girls face down and handcuffed in a Colorado parking lot was the last straw for University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law Professor Larry S. Gibson.  A recognized civil rights activist, historian, and political consultant, Gibson is calling for an end to the…

Community-service partnership improves youths’ perception of police, ASU research shows

In his latest research, Adam Fine, an assistant professor in the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice, explores how those attitudes diverge by race at a young age, and how a specific community-service partnership program called Team Kids can change youths’ views toward police officers. His paper, “Police Legitimacy: Identifying Developmental Trends and Whether Youths’ Perceptions Can be Changed,” was published recently in the Journal of Experimental Criminology.

Use of Ketamine for a Non-medical Purpose: Statement from the American Society of Anesthesiologists

The American Society of Anesthesiologists firmly opposes the use of ketamine or any other sedative/hypnotic agent to chemically incapacitate someone for a law enforcement purpose and not for a legitimate medical reason. Ketamine is a potent analgesic, sedative and general anesthetic agent which can elevate blood pressure and heart rate, and can lead to confusion, agitation, delirium, and hallucinations. These effects can end in death when administered in a non-health care setting without appropriately trained medical personnel and necessary equipment.

Smart Cities Initiative Tests In-Building Sensors during Soft Target / Active Shooter Exercise at George Mason University

This week, DHS S&T evaluated a suite of in-building sensors developed through the Smart City Internet of Things Innovation (SCITI – pronounced “city”) Labs effort during a live active shooter exercise at George Mason University’s (GMU) Eagle Bank Arena.

UTHealth leads effort to enhance Texas’ financial exploitation investigations of seniors

An elder abuse team at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) is partnering with the Texas Department of Family and Protective Services, district attorneys, law enforcement agencies, and forensic accounting professionals to make it easier to identify and prosecute individuals who prey on senior citizens to exploit them financially.