Florida State Sociologist, Author Examines Benign Neglect of Flint Residents in “Tainted Tap”

By: Mark Blackwell Thomas | Published: March 17, 2021 | 3:09 pm | SHARE: It’s been seven years since the city of Flint, Michigan responded to a budget shortfall by switching its water source from Detroit, which draws from Lake Huron, to the Flint River. That move set off a years-long health crisis that has devastated lives and led to the indictment of the state’s former governor and eight other public officials.

Population distribution can greatly impact COVID-19 spread, UCI-led study finds

Irvine, Calif., Oct. 1, 2020 — Uneven population distribution can significantly impact the severity and timing of COVID-19 infections within a city or county, leading individual communities to have vastly different experiences with the pandemic, according to a recent study led by the University of California, Irvine. Findings published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences show that the heterogeneous spatial features of interpersonal connections may produce dramatic local variations in exposures to those with the illness.

Survey of rural Iowa communities will gauge pandemic response

Residents in 70 rural Iowa communities soon will receive surveys that will help to inform state and federal officials as they orchestrate the response to the COVID-19 pandemic. The survey, orchestrated by researchers at Iowa State University and the University of Iowa, will cover topics ranging from the availability of health care services to the reliability of high-speed internet to the economic stresses placed on a community by the pandemic.

9 in 10 men want their doctors to ask about domestic violence

A nationally representative survey of young men finds that 90 percent believe their doctors should ask whether they have perpetrated or experienced domestic violence — but only 13 percent have ever been asked. The large gap suggests that physicians have an opportunity to begin more conversations about domestic violence and potentially intervene, says Tova Walsh, a professor of social work at the University of Wisconsin–Madison, who led the study.

Place doesn’t trump race as predictor of incarceration

Steven Alvarado is the author of “The Complexities of Race and Place: Childhood Neighborhood Disadvantage and Adult Incarceration for Whites, Blacks, and Latinos,” published June 1 in the journal Socius, a study showing that for black Americans growing up in better neighborhoods doesn’t diminish the likelihood of going to prison nearly as much as it does for whites or Latinos.

Persistent inequitable exposure to air pollution in Salt Lake County schools

Salt Lake County, Utah’s air pollution is at times the worst in the United States. Underserved neighborhoods—and their schools—experience the highest concentrations. A new study utilized nearly 200 PM 2.5 sensors through the Air Quality and U network and revealed persistent social inequalities in Salt Lake County schools.

Research takes aim at social tool for fighting COVID-19

The social distancing of COVID-19 might have its own long-term effects; a Bowling Green State University team of sociologists — Drs. Peggy Giordano, Monica Longmore and Wendy Manning — received a National Science Foundation grant to conduct research on social distancing and what factors might influence individuals’ levels of compliance.

FSU expert available to comment on psychological effects of social isolation during COVID-19 pandemic

By: Bill Wellock | Published: March 30, 2020 | 3:36 pm | SHARE: Millions of Americans are staying home to “flatten the curve” of coronavirus cases.Among those avoiding other people are many older Americans, whose age puts them at a greater risk of serious complications from a COVID-19 infection. That isolation — for seniors and for everyone else — can bring loneliness and frustration.

IU sociologist available to comment on how school closures, e-learning disproportionately impact low-income students

With more than 10,600 of the nation’s public and private schools temporarily closing in response to the novel coronavirus (COVID-19), low-income students are disproportionally impacted. Many families rely on schools to provide child care and meals while the adults are…

Prisoner’s Dilemma Game Reveals Cooperation Leads to Leadership

Game theory has historically studied cooperation and hierarchy, and has sought to explain why individuals cooperate, even though they might be better off not to do so. In this week’s Chaos, researchers use a specialized graph to map a social network of cooperators and their neighbors; they discovered cooperators can attract more neighbors to follow their behaviors and are more likely to become leaders, indicating different learning patterns exist between cooperators and defectors.

FSU experts available to comment on healthy aging

September is Healthy Aging Month, an annual national observance to focus attention on the positive aspects of growing older.Florida State University faculty are among the global leaders in the study of gerontology, aging and longevity. These experts are available to comment on a variety of topics related to healthy aging and successful longevity.