Severe COVID-19 caused by “senile” interferon response in older patients, researchers suggest

Researchers in Germany have discovered that age-dependent impairments in antiviral interferon proteins underlie the increased susceptibility of older patients to severe COVID-19. The study, published today in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), shows that aged mice infected with SARS-CoV-2 are protected from severe disease by treatment with one of these interferons, IFN-γ.

CHOP Study Explores the Use of Telemedicine in Child Neurology in Largest Study to Date

Researchers found that across nearly 50,000 visits, patients continued to use telemedicine effectively even with the reopening of outpatient clinics a year after the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic. However, prominent barriers for socially vulnerable families and racial and ethnic minorities persist, suggesting more work is required to reach a wider population with telemedicine.

Women’s mental well-being more sensitive to exercise than men’s during different stages of pandemic

Women’s mental health was more likely to be affected by physical exercise frequency during the COVID-19 pandemic than men’s, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York.

Investigadores de Mayo Clinic precisan variaciones genéticas que podrían cambiar el curso de la COVID-19

Los investigadores del Centro para Medicina Personalizada en Mayo Clinic descubrieron en el genoma humano firmas decisivas que podrían explicar por qué la COVID-19 es tan grave en algunas personas y leve en otras.

妙佑医疗国际(Mayo Clinic)的研究人员精准确定可能影响COVID-19病程的基因变异

妙佑医疗国际个体化医学中心的研究人员已经发现了助于解释为何COVID-19在一些患者中引起重症而在另一些患者中引起轻症的关键人类基因组特征。在分析了全球大量不同的DNA序列数据后,科学家们在两种人类蛋白质中发现了可能影响SARS-CoV-2(即导致COVID-19的病毒)感染病程的突变。

UCI research team finds positivity is not equally protective against illness across races

Research has consistently shown that positive psychological factors are linked to better physical health, including increased resistance to infectious illnesses such as the flu and the common cold. A new study from the University of California, Irvine, examines the role that race plays in this connection, comparing the results of African American and European American participants in a series of landmark experimental studies from the Common Cold Project, conducted between 1993 and 2011.

UCI study examines distorted time perception during pandemic

The passage of time was altered for many people during the COVID-19 pandemic, ranging from difficulty in keeping track of days of the week to feeling that the hours themselves rushed by or slowed down. In prior work, these distortions have been associated with persistent negative mental outcomes such as depression and anxiety following trauma, making them an important risk factor to target with early interventions, according to a study by University of California, Irvine researchers.

Myocarditis risk significantly higher after COVID-19 infection vs. after a COVID-19 vaccine

In a detailed analysis of nearly 43 million people, ages 13 and older, who received at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine in England, the risk of myocarditis in unvaccinated individuals after COVID-19 infection was at least 11 times higher compared to people who developed myocarditis after receiving a COVID-19 vaccine or booster dose between December 1, 2020 and December 15, 2021, according to new research published today in the American Heart Association’s flagship, peer-reviewed journal Circulation.

COVID OUT clinical trial suggests metformin effective at reducing odds of serious outcomes for COVID-19 patients seeking early treatment

Published in the New England Journal of Medicine, researchers — led by the University of Minnesota Medical School and School of Public Health — have found that metformin, a commonly prescribed diabetes medication, lowers the odds of emergency department visits, hospitalizations, or death due to COVID-19 by over 40 percent; and over 50 percent if prescribed early in onset of symptoms.

Cedars-Sinai Lung Transplant Outcomes Rated Outstanding

A new report on lung transplantation success rates confirms that Cedars-Sinai patients experienced one-year survival outcomes of 91.49%, an achievement above the national average of 89.46%.

Mayo Clinic research shows bebtelovimab to be a reliable option for treating COVID-19 in era of BA.2, other subvariants

Mayo Clinic researchers say the monoclonal antibody bebtelovimab, already authorized by the Food and Drug Administration for emergency use on the omicron variant of COVID-19, is a reliable option to treat BA.2 and other COVID-19 subvariants. The findings of their multisite, retrospective study involving 3,607 high-risk patients appear in the Journal of Infectious Diseases.

UTSW scientists identify mechanism crucial for COVID-19 virus replication

A team led by UT Southwestern researchers has identified how SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, builds a structure called the RNA cap that’s critical for successful viral replication. The finding, published in Nature, could lead to new strategies to attack COVID-19, which has sickened nearly 600 million and killed more than 6 million worldwide thus far.

JMIR Formative Research | Competition & Integration of Health Systems Post COVID-19

JMIR Publications published a study titled “Competition and Integration of US Health Systems in the Post-COVID-19 New Normal: Cross-sectional Survey” in JMIR Formative Research, which reported that the smaller the geographical region in which mergers and acquisitions (M&A) activity is pursued, the higher the likelihood that monopolistic tendencies will result.

How Wastewater Surveillance Can Mitigate Monkeypox Spread: Expert Available

Just when it seemed like we could sit back and breathe a sigh of relief from declining COVID-19 rates in Nevada, another virus started making headlines: Monkeypox. Local COVID cases have been on a downward trajectory for more than a month. But a wastewater surveillance program led by UNLV Kirk Kerkorian School of Medicine professor and infectious disease expert Edwin Oh has started tracking monkeypox,making Southern Nevada among the first few metropolitan areas nationwide to begin searching the sewers for the emerging virus.

Mental health challenges contributed to weight gain for people with obesity during COVID-19

Over the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic, almost 30% of patients with obesity gained more than 5% of their body weight, and 1 in 7 gained more than 10%. While diet and exercise habits were factors, people with the highest levels of stress, anxiety, and depression reported the most weight gain, UT Southwestern researchers reported in the journal Obesity.