Poor and Minority Communities Suffer More from Extreme Heat in U.S. Cities

Low-income neighborhoods and communities with higher Black, Hispanic and Asian populations experience significantly more urban heat than wealthier and predominantly white neighborhoods within a vast majority of populous U.S. counties, according new research from the University of California San Diego’s School of Global Policy and Strategy.

Only 20 states implemented health equity committees to assist with COVID-19 vaccine distribution planning

A new study out of UChicago found that while 43 states (out of 51, including all 50 states and Washington, D.C.) created a committee to develop a vaccine distribution plan, only 20 plans mentioned using a health equity committee to assist with plan development.

Food Insufficiency Rates in California Increased by More Than a Fifth in Earliest Months of Pandemic

A UCLA team has found that in the first three months of the COVID-19 pandemic, more than three million Californians reported their households went without sufficient food. That was an increase of 22% from the pre-pandemic rate, and the impact was felt widely across the state, especially among those already facing hunger.

UA Little Rock Receives Nearly $325,000 NSF Grant to Shine Light on Muslim Hate Crimes in Arkansas

Two criminal justice professors at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock have been awarded a $324,987 grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to fund a three-year program to study anti-Muslim sentiment and Muslim hate crimes in Arkansas. Dr. Tusty ten Bensel, director of the School of Criminal Justice and Criminology, and Dr.

UCI, Tsinghua U.: California’s 2018 wildfires caused $150 billion in damages

Irvine, Calif., Dec. 7, 2020 — In 2018, California wildfires caused economic losses of nearly $150 billion, or about 0.7 percent of the gross domestic product of the entire United States that year, and a considerable fraction of those costs affected people far from the fires and even outside of the Golden State. For a study published today in Nature Sustainability, researchers at the University of California, Irvine, China’s Tsinghua University and other institutions combined physical, epidemiological and economic models to gain a more comprehensive understanding of the impact of the blazes.

Philadelphia Tax on Sweetened Drinks Led to Drop in Sales

Philadelphia’s tax on sweetened beverages led to a 38.9 percent drop in the volume of taxed beverages sold at small, independent retailers and a significant increase in the price of taxed beverages, according to new research from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. This study builds on previous research that suggests beverage taxes can help reduce purchases of sugary drinks, led by Christina Roberto, PhD, an associate professor of Medical Ethics and Health Policy at Penn, and senior author on this latest paper published in Health Affairs.

Studies examine how race affects perceptions of law-involved Blacks, school discipline

The extent of discriminatory treatment Black adults and children experience at every point of contact within the legal system and the biases that result in Black children’s behavior being managed more harshly in school are detailed in two new analyses from researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago.

UCI to lead $10 million NSF-funded center on protecting personal data privacy

Irvine, Calif., June 12, 2020 — The National Science Foundation has awarded $10 million to support a new research center devoted to personal data privacy in an increasingly networked and instrumented world. The center will be hosted and led by the University of California, Irvine and is in collaboration with Northeastern University, the University of Iowa, the University of Southern California and Spain’s IMDEA Networks Institute.

UCLA Fielding School of Public Health experts available for media inquiries related to COVID-19

The UCLA Fielding School of Public Health has multiple experts available for media inquiries related to COVID-19. These include experts with English, Chinese (Mandarin), French, German, and Spanish fluency. They include: Professor Hiram Beltrán-Sánchez Hiram Beltrán-Sánchez is an associate professor of…

Nonprofits Navigate Uncertain Times Amid Coronavirus Pandemic

Performing arts centers. Hospitals. Museums. Social service agencies. Nonprofit organizations in local communities are as vast and varied as the private businesses that operate and make up a majority of a city’s economic engine. But as state leaders gave orders…

Both our political past and present shape America’s response to COVID-19, says policy expert

One researcher at West Virginia University suggests that we need to set aside political partisanship as the U.S. responds to the novel coronavirus.  President Donald Trump declared a national emergency Friday (March 13). Earlier this week, the World Health Organization declared it…

CROWN Conference: Can Public Policy End Hair Discrimination?

The Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy will host the CROWN Conference: Can Public Policy End Hair Discrimination to discuss a New Jersey bill known as the CROWN Act (Creating a Respectful and Open World for Naturals). The bill would protect people’s right to wear natural hairstyles, such as Afros, braids, twists or and locs, which are often worn by African-Americans.

Researchers begin major study aimed at improving health equity in New Jersey

The New Jersey Population Health Cohort Study, now in the design phase, will collect biometrics, survey responses and other granular data over time on major outcomes such as stress, resilience, trauma and cognitive function from a broad cross-section of the population across multiple generations, with additional targeting of low-income residents and diverse immigrant groups.

Paid Sick Leave and Flextime Benefits Result in Significantly More Retirement Savings

Researchers found that workers with flexible work time enjoyed a 24.8 percent increase in retirement savings compared to those without the benefit; workers with paid sick leave had retirement savings 29.6 percent higher than those workers who lacked paid sick leave benefits; and workers with six to 10 paid sick leave days and workers with more than 10 paid sick leave days annually had a statistically and significantly higher amount in their retirement savings (30.1 percent and 40.7 percent, respectively).

The Association of American Cancer Institutes Launches Public Policy Resource Library

The AACI Public Policy Resource Library aims to enable cancer centers and partners in the cancer advocacy community to share resources to foster collaboration, promote cancer prevention, and spur the development of sound public health policy at the state and local level.

As ‘Orange is the New Black’ Ends, UNLV Professor Explores How Conditions Have Changed for Incarcerated Women

The Litchfield Correctional Facility in upstate New York might be the fictitious background of Netflix’s hit series “Orange is the New Black.” But the stories of the inmates — portrayed by Hollywood actresses — could be easily found throughout real…