Lower Airways Are Distinct in Cystic Fibrosis Even at Younger Ages

In the largest study of its kind, researchers found that the lower airways in children with cystic fibrosis (CF) have a higher burden of infection, more inflammation and lower diversity of microorganisms, compared to children with other illnesses who also have lung issues. They noted a clear divergence in these bacterial communities in toddlers, which is typically before progressive lung disease takes hold in patients with CF. Their findings, published in the journal PLOS ONE, could help providers target specific pathogens earlier, treat them and potentially prevent more severe lung disease.

Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center Launches New Center to Expand Commitment to Meeting the Unique Needs of Adolescents and Young Adults with Cancer

While overall cancer cases are declining, they are on the rise in older adolescents and young adults. Today, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSK) announces the establishment of the Lisa and Scott Stuart Center for Adolescent and Young Adult Cancers (the Stuart Center), dramatically expanding MSK’s already robust efforts to address the very specific, and often unmet, needs of this patient population.

Researchers Show Novel Device Improves Blood Sugar Control in Hyperinsulinism Patients Whose Pancreas Has Been Removed

Researchers at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) have demonstrated that an experimental device can improve blood sugar control in patients who developed diabetes after their pancreas was removed to treat their hyperinsulinism, a genetic disease in which the pancreas produces too much insulin. Using a combination of continuous glucose monitoring, two hormone pumps, and an algorithm, the device, known as the bihormonal bionic pancreas (BHBP) and developed by researchers at Boston University, helped HI patients with diabetes maintain stable glucose levels over the study period.

Do a Mom’s Medications Affect Her Breast Milk and Baby? New Center Investigates

UC San Diego School of Medicine receives $6.1M to launch a new research center studying the effects of maternal antibiotic use on breast milk and infant health. The center is funded by National Institutes of Health, as part of their new Maternal and Pediatric Precision in Therapeutics (MPRINT) Hub.

Alarming Upward Trend in Black Youth Suicide From 2003 to 2017

In the United States, the rates of suicide and suicidal behavior among youth, children and adolescents 5-17 years of age, have been steadily increasing over the last decade, and Black youth, 5-12 years, are approximately two times more likely to die by suicide than their White counterparts. However, the literature investigating Black youth suicide is extremely limited. For the first time, researchers have examined the trends and precipitating circumstances of suicide in Black youth only by age group and sex.

Study: No Serious COVID-19 Vaccine Side Effects in Breastfeeding Moms, Infants

Researchers found that breastfeeding mothers who received either the Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna vaccination reported the same local or systemic symptoms as what has been previously reported in non-breastfeeding women, with no serious side effects in the breastfed infants.

Study Shows Contact with Police May Be Detrimental to Health, Well-Being of Black Youth

According to a Johns Hopkins Medicine study published today in JAMA Pediatrics, exposure to police — even in instances in which the officers are providing assistance — may be detrimental to the health and well-being of Black youth, especially males, and can be associated with poor mental health, substance use, risky sexual behaviors and impaired safety.

Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia Researchers Develop Tools to Measure Skeletal Muscle Function in Patients with Mitochondrial Disease

Researchers successfully developed and validated a new outcome measure to monitor disease severity and progression in patients with impaired skeletal muscle function caused by mitochondrial disease. This measure, named ‘Mitochondrial Myopathy-Composite Assessment Tool’ (‘MM-COAST’), is important to identify specific skeletal muscle and neurological problems in both children and adults with mitochondrial disease and may be used to measure response to treatment interventions in future clinical trials.

Every 46 Minutes a Child is Treated in a U.S. Emergency Department for an Injury from a Furniture or TV Tip-Over

Furniture and TV tip-overs are an important source of injury, especially for children younger than 6 years old. A recent study led by researchers at the Center for Injury Research and Policy at Nationwide Children’s Hospital found that an estimated 560,200 children younger than 18 years old were treated in U.S. emergency departments for furniture or TV tip-over injuries from 1990 through 2019. In 2019, there were 11,521 injured children, which is an average of one child every 46 minutes.

Families Estimated to Lose $18,000 a Year in Wages When They Have to Cut Work Hours or Leave a Job to Care for Their Child’s Health

A study that identified over 14,000 previously employed American families of children with special healthcare needs found that families who had to reduce work hours or leave a job in order to care for their children’s health lost an estimated average of $18,000 a year in household income in 2016-2017.

August is National Breastfeeding Month: @UCSDHealth Experts on Health Benefits and Latest in COVID-19 Research

August is National Breastfeeding Month, intended to raise awareness of the health benefits that breast milk provides, including: Reduction in Sudden Infant Death Syndrome Fewer infections: ear, respiratory, diarrhea, bladder, meningitis Decrease in childhood obesity Reduction in diabetes, celiac disease,…

CHOP Researchers Develop Coating for Endotracheal Tubes that Releases Antimicrobial Peptides

In a proof-of-concept study, researchers at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) have created a coating that can be applied to endotracheal tubes and release antimicrobial peptides that target infectious bacteria with specificity. The innovation could reduce upper-airway bacterial inflammation during intubation, a situation that can lead to chronic inflammation and a condition called subglottic stenosis, the narrowing of the airway by an accumulation of scar tissue. The findings were published recently in the journal The Laryngoscope.

Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia Researchers Identify Approach for Potential Nontypeable Haemophilus Influenzae Vaccine

Scientists at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) have identified two proteins that could be used for a potential vaccine against nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi). Working in a mouse model, the investigators found that administering two bacterial adhesive proteins that play a key role in helping the bacteria to latch on to respiratory cells and initiate respiratory tract infection stimulated protective immunity against diverse NTHi strains, highlighting the vaccine potential.

New Study Finds Hands-free Cellphone Laws Associated with Fewer Driver Deaths

A recent study led by researchers at the Center for Injury Research and Policy at Nationwide Children’s Hospital looked at drivers, non-drivers (passengers, pedestrians, bicyclists, motorcyclists), and total deaths involved in passenger vehicle crashes from 1999 through 2016 in 50 U.S. states, along with the presence and characteristics of cellphone use laws.

Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia Researchers Develop “Dimmer Switch” to Help Control Gene Therapy

In a major advancement in the field of gene therapy for rare and devastating diseases, researchers at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) have developed a “dimmer switch” system that can control levels of proteins expressed from gene therapy vectors. The system is based on alternative RNA splicing using an orally available small molecule and works effectively in tissues throughout the body, including the brain. The first research regarding this innovation was published today in the journal Nature.

Anticipate a resurgence of respiratory viruses in young children

Canada should anticipate a resurgence of a childhood respiratory virus as COVID-19 physical distancing measures are relaxed, authors warn in CMAJ ( Canadian Medical Association Journal) . Cases of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) have risen sharply in Australia and, more…

The Lancet: 1.5 million children worldwide have lost parent, grandparent, caregiver due to COVID-19

Study offers first global estimates of the number of children who experienced the death of a parent, grandparent, or primary caregiver from COVID-19. Researchers estimated figures based on COVID-19 mortality data from March 2020 through April 2021, and national fertility…

Co-locating Contraceptive Services & Opioid Treatment Programs May Help Prevent Unintended Pregnancy

More than 75% of women with Opioid Use Disorder report having had an unintended pregnancy, but they are less likely to use effective contraception compared to women who do not use drugs. Results from a multi-year trial found that a two-part intervention featuring co-located contraceptive services in opioid treatment programs and financial incentives could offer an effective solution.

Sociodemographic characteristics, inequities associated with access to in-person, remote elementary schooling during pandemic in New York State

What The Study Did: Among the few New York state public school districts providing full-time in-person elementary school instruction during the COVID-19 pandemic, most districts served predominately white students, rural/suburban students and children who were not disadvantaged (children who were…

Early intervention in schools needed to address Malta’s obesity crisis

A new study by the University of Malta and Staffordshire University highlights an urgent need for change in the curriculum and demonstrates how introducing longer, more frequent and more physically intense PE lessons can significantly improve children’s weight and overall…

Survival for babies born with a birth defect – a “post-code lottery”

Survival for a baby born with a birth defect – otherwise known as a congenital anomaly – is a “post-code lottery”, according to scientists from 74 countries. A study published today in The Lancet , led by researchers from King’s…