New $20 Million Grant Will Help Johns Hopkins Develop Technologies for Healthy Aging

Johns Hopkins has received a $20 million grant from the National Institute on Aging that will spur the development of artificial intelligence devices (AI) to improve the health of older adults and help them live independently for longer — a relatively untapped use of this technology.

Study Shows Use of Smartphone App Associated with Lower Hospital Readmission Rates for Heart Attack Survivors

Data collected from a group of 200 heart attack survivors using a smartphone app designed to navigate the recovery process, such as medication management and lifestyle changes, showed that app users experienced hospital readmission within the first 30 days of discharge at half the rate of a comparable group given standard aftercare without the app.

Study Shows Contact with Police May Be Detrimental to Health, Well-Being of Black Youth

According to a Johns Hopkins Medicine study published today in JAMA Pediatrics, exposure to police — even in instances in which the officers are providing assistance — may be detrimental to the health and well-being of Black youth, especially males, and can be associated with poor mental health, substance use, risky sexual behaviors and impaired safety.

The Monday Campaigns Offers DeStress Monday at School to Reduce Teacher Stress

Studies show most teachers experience high stress levels. The COVID-19 pandemic only exacerbated the problem. Many teachers felt heightened pressure and experienced burnout as they navigated hybrid and remote teaching in the midst of a global pandemic. When teachers go back to the classroom this fall, they will undoubtedly continue to feel stress as they face the uncertainties that lie ahead. To provide teachers with effective tools to relieve stress, The Monday Campaigns, a nonprofit public health initiative, is offering their DeStress Monday at School program free of charge to schools.

Story Tips from Johns Hopkins Experts on COVID-19

NEWS STORIES IN THIS ISSUE:

-Physician and Musician: Johns Hopkins Doctor Brings Passion for Music to Medicine During Pandemic
-Rapid, At-Home Blood Test Could Confirm COVID-19 Vaccination in Minutes
-What to Expect and Prepare for As You Return to Regular Health Care Appointments
-Study Suggests Sudden Hearing Loss Not Associated with COVID-19 Vaccination
-Vaccination May Not Rid COVID-19 Risk for Those with Rheumatic, Musculoskeletal Diseases

Depression in older adults undergoing hip fracture repair associated with delirium after surgery

Screening for even mild depressive symptoms before hip fracture repair may be helpful in predicting which patients are at higher risk of developing delirium after emergency surgery, according to results of a new study by researchers from Johns Hopkins Medicine. The researchers say their findings also add to evidence that symptoms of depression and postoperative delirium may be an early indicator of Alzheimer’s disease, although those findings were not conclusive.

Johns Hopkins Medicine Expert Creates Comprehensive Guide to New Diabetes Drugs

New medicines for people who have diabetes seem to pop up all the time. Drugs that help the body break down carbohydrates, drugs that increase excretion of glucose in the urine, drugs that help muscles respond to insulin and drugs that stimulate the pancreas to produce it — the list of pharmaceutical options to treat diabetes gets longer and longer.

A Johns Hopkins University health care expert is available to offer perspective on the news that a mistake at a Johnson & Johnson factory producing the COVID-19 vaccine resulted in the loss of millions of doses.

A Johns Hopkins University health care expert is available to offer perspective on the news that a mistake at a Johnson & Johnson factory producing the COVID-19 vaccine resulted in the loss of millions of doses. Tinglong Dai is an…

Vaccine Prioritization Dashboard Launches @JohnsHopkins for People with Disabilities

A new Johns Hopkins data tool helps people with disabilities determine when they qualify for the COVID-19 vaccine and compares how different states prioritize the disability community in the vaccine rollout.

Created by researchers, students and advocates who themselves are disabled and have personally experienced how inequitable and inaccessible the pandemic response has been, the COVID-19 Vaccine Prioritization Dashboard launched to not only help the disability community get vaccinated, but also to arm policymakers with data to improve the system.

Johns Hopkins Scientists Find Mammals Share Gene Pathways That Allow Zebrafish To Grow New Eyes

Working with fish, birds and mice, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers report new evidence that some animals’ natural capacity to regrow neurons is not missing, but is instead inactivated in mammals. Specifically, the researchers found that some genetic pathways that allow many fish and other cold-blooded animals to repair specialized eye neurons after injury remain present in mammals as well, but are turned off, blocking regeneration and healing.

Most U.S. Schools Teaching Black History, But Few Doing It Well

As the United States marks Black History Month this year, more K-12 schools in the United States are teaching Black history than ever before. However, ongoing analysis from Johns Hopkins University finds these efforts often fail, because coursework emphasizes the negative aspects of African American life while omitting important contributions made by families of color in literature, politics, theology, art, and medicine.

The Johns Hopkins School of Nursing Welcomes New Associate Dean for Development and Alumni Relations

Sharon Trivino will join the Johns Hopkins School of Nursing (JHSON) as Associate Dean for Development and Alumni Relations. Trivino brings more than 15 years of experience in strategic and creative capital campaign design and management of alumni initiatives and engagement.“We are incredibly excited to welcome Sharon Trivino to the Johns Hopkins School of Nursing,” says Dean Patricia Davidson, PhD, MEd, RN, FAAN.

Potential Means Of Improving Learning And Memory In People With Mental Illnesses

More than a dozen drugs are known to treat symptoms such as hallucinations, erratic behaviors, disordered thinking and emotional extremes associated with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and other severe mental illnesses. But, drug treatments specifically able to target the learning, memory and concentration problems that may accompany such disorders remain elusive.

Psychedelic Treatment with Psilocybin Relieves Major Depression, Study Shows

In a small study of adults with major depression, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers report that two doses of the psychedelic substance psilocybin, given with supportive psychotherapy, produced rapid and large reductions in depressive symptoms, with most participants showing improvement and half of study participants achieving remission through the four-week follow-up.

Story Tips From Johns Hopkins Experts On COVID-19

Johns Hopkins Medicine biomedical engineering student Christopher Shallal developed an initiative to keep health care teams safe by galvanizing community members to use 3D printers to make face shields. His mentors on the project were Elizabeth Logsdon, Ph.D., and Warren Grayson, Ph.D.

Johns Hopkins ‘JustUs Dialogues’ Will Spotlight Critical Health and Justice Disparities

Five years ago, amid the grief and outrage surrounding the death of Freddie Gray, Johns Hopkins and the rest of Baltimore sharpened focus on making the city more just and equal. And last May, George Floyd’s death at the hands of Minneapolis police sparked a historic reckoning around race and inequality in America. Beginning Thursday, Aug. 20 at 5:00 p.m., The Johns Hopkins University and Johns Hopkins Medicine will host a free online five-part series of discussions featuring many of the nation’s most important voices on this topic.

Story Tips From Johns Hopkins Experts on COVID-19

Recently, several physicians hosted a press conference in which one physician claimed that the combination of hydroxychloroquine, the antibiotic azithromycin and the mineral zinc could cure COVID-19. The video footage of that press conference went viral on social media, and soon many social media platforms removed the videos for providing inaccurate, non-scientifically backed claims. But questions from the public may still remain.

Cholesterol-Lowering Drug Improved Function of Heart’s Arteries

In a pilot study of people living with HIV or high levels of cholesterol, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers found that a six-week course of a cholesterol-lowering medication improved the function of the coronary arteries that provide oxygen to the heart.

The Johns Hopkins School of Nursing is Ranked the No. 1 Nursing Master’s Program in the U.S.

For the third consecutive year, the Johns Hopkins School of Nursing (JHSON) is the No. 1 accredited master’s nursing program in the country, according to 2021 U.S. News & World Report rankings. It is ranked No. 3 for its Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) program and top-ranked across the board within specialty rankings.“We are truly proud of this ranking and the spotlight it puts on the hard work that is the backbone to our success in education, research, and practice,” says JHSON Dean Patricia Davidson, PhD, MEd, RN, FAAN.

The Johns Hopkins School of Nursing Ranks at the Top for Online Education

The Johns Hopkins School of Nursing is top-ranked for its online master’s nursing programs according to U.S. News & World Report’s 2020 rankings. The school ranked No. 3 overall and No. 2 for its administration specialty.