Juneteenth Recognition Gains Momentum, Significance in Wake of George Floyd, Black Lives Matter Protests

Juneteenth, the oldest nationally celebrated commemoration of the end of slavery in the United States, seems poised to become the nation’s newest federally observed holiday. Also known as “Emancipation Day,” “Freedom Day,” or “Jubilee Day,” Juneteenth recognizes the date on which Union Major General Gordon Granger arrived in Galveston, Texas, to inform enslaved African Americans of their freedom: June 19, 1865. This news essentially came two and a half years after President Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation became official on January 1, 1863.
Two professors put holiday’s history and significance into modern context.

ACSM Annual Meeting Research Highlights for June 3

ACSM’s comprehensive sports medicine and exercise science conference takes place virtually from June 1 to 5 with programming covering the science, practice, public health and policy aspects of sports medicine, exercise science and physical activity.

Researchers publish call to action for research ethics in the time of COVID-19 and BLM

In their paper “Ethics of Research at the Intersection of COVID-19 and Black Lives Matter: A Call to Action,” UIC faculty authors highlight the historical issues that impact research involving Black populations. They also provide recommendations for researchers to ethically engage Black populations in research. The article is published online in the Journal of Medical Ethics.

Most U.S. Schools Teaching Black History, But Few Doing It Well

As the United States marks Black History Month this year, more K-12 schools in the United States are teaching Black history than ever before. However, ongoing analysis from Johns Hopkins University finds these efforts often fail, because coursework emphasizes the negative aspects of African American life while omitting important contributions made by families of color in literature, politics, theology, art, and medicine.

Survey collection reveals over 80 years of public opinion on race

The Roper Center for Public Opinion Research at Cornell University has launched “Say Their Names. Hear Their Voices,” a publicly available collection of more than 80 years of public opinion surveys of Black Americans and U.S. attitudes about Black America, presented with context about race in polling over the years

United States should implement nationwide truth commission on police violence against Black people

The United States needs to implement a nationwide truth commission on police violence against Black people, according to Kerry Whigham, assistant professor of genocide and mass atrocity prevention at Binghamton University, State University of New York. “If recent instances of…

New Seminar Series Aims To Expose, Explain Threats to U.S. Democracy

A group of political science scholars is launching a webinar series on Friday to highlight escalating threats to democracy that have been percolating for decades and boiling over ever since Donald Trump’s election.

Protesting Police Brutality: UNLV African American Studies Professor on How Protests Can Enact Social Change

The days and weeks following the murder of George Floyd at the hands of police in Minneapolis, Minnesota have been marked by a civil rights movement that — in terms of size and structure — could be considered larger than…

Tips for discussing racism with your children

As protests pushing for police reform and racial justice spread across the U.S., parents may find themselves needing to discuss difficult topics with their children. Parents should think of it as an ongoing conversation, says Laura Bronstein, dean of the…

Tearing down statues won’t end structural racism

Confederate monuments are being torn down across the United States as the protests sparked by the killing of George Floyd continue. While the Confederate statues represent a step backwards, tearing them down will not end structural racism, says Anne Bailey,…

Civil rights scholar: “I fear for my Black son every day”

In the wake of the murder of George Floyd, whose last words were “Momma, I’m through,” civil rights scholar and Binghamton University Professof of History Anne C. Bailey discusses the constant fear that Black mothers hold for their sons.  “As…