Patients of women doctors more likely to be vaccinated against the flu

Elderly patients of female physicians are more likely than those of male physicians in the same outpatient practice to be vaccinated against the flu. This trend holds for all racial and ethnic groups studied and could provide insight into improving vaccination rates for influenza, COVID-19 and other illnesses

Systemic Racism & Health Care: Building Black Confidence in the COVID-19 Vaccine

The Tuskegee syphilis experiment. The secret sale of Henrietta Lacks cancer research cells. Jim Crow laws affecting African Americans’ ability to receive medical treatment. For weeks, it’s been hard to hear over the clamor of millions of Americans lining up for COVID-19 vaccines. But not everyone has been enthused — namely, large swaths of minority communities, which comprise the populations disproportionately impacted by the virus, but whose hesitance is largely fueled by the country’s racist medical past.

Vice Presidential Vogue: Kamala Harris and White House Fashion

As Kamala Harris stood beside newly sworn-in President Joe Biden last week, all eyes were on her as she made history as the nation’s first female vice president.  But, much like other prominent women who have walked the halls of the White House before her, cultural experts expect that there will be  just as much focus on her fashion statements as on her political ones — and the scrutiny may be intensified as the first woman and person of color in the VP position takes on stereotypes surrounding Eurocentric standards of beauty.

New Study Examines Impact of COVID-19 Pandemic on Nevada Unemployment

UNLV political science professor John Tuman is available to speak about the findings of his new study examining the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on labor market conditions in Nevada. The research, published last week in the Early View section…

Tips for Tackling Implicit Bias in Teaching and Learning 

Kendra Gage describes implicit bias as the stories we make up about people before we get to know them. It’s a practical and personal definition from an historian who studies what some consider an unlikely, even unpopular, topic for a white professor — the civil rights movement. Because of her chosen discipline, Gage, an assistant professor of African American and African Diaspora Studies in the UNLV College of Liberal Arts, said she’s received questions and double-takes from students and others who are surprised to find her at the helm of an African American Studies class.

Study: Why U.S. Black Entrepreneurship Lags & How Banks Can Help Fix It

A steady stream of media reports detailing the deaths of unarmed Black Americans at the hands of police. False 911 calls aimed at bringing harm to African Americans engaged in innocuous, everyday activities. Street protests calling for an end to discrimination and police brutality.  As racial tensions swirled this summer, so did calls on social media for those who support the social justice movement for African American civil rights to amplify Black voices and support Black businesses.

How Hospitality Industry Should Address Discrimination

After the worldwide protests that erupted over the killing of George Floyd, it is hard for me to imagine any person, company, or institution, continuing to discount the role that racism plays in our society. People all over are demanding an end to racial discrimination that is embedded in our social systems.  In hospitality, emerging research has shined light on the perception of discrimination among industry workers, but personally, it comes as no surprise to me.

Protesting Police Brutality: UNLV African American Studies Professor on How Protests Can Enact Social Change

The days and weeks following the murder of George Floyd at the hands of police in Minneapolis, Minnesota have been marked by a civil rights movement that — in terms of size and structure — could be considered larger than…

Story of jailed 17th-century Iberian “mulatto pilgrim” told in new book by John K. Moore Jr.

The book tells the story of a man jailed for impersonating a priest in 1693 Spain, when he was likely trying to escape racial persecution. It gives readers a fascinating look at a centuries-old legal case against a man on pilgrimage and shows how Iberians of black-African ancestry faced discrimination and mistreatment.

By Christine Clark Feb 06, 2020 Subscribe A Nation Dangerously Divided: Race Shapes Who Wins and Who Loses in U.S. Democracy

Race is shown to be the single most important factor in American democracy, determining which candidates win elections, which voters win at the polls, and who is on the losing end of policy. These conclusions are at the center of a new book Dangerously Divided: How Race and Class Shape Winning and Losing in American Politics,” by Zoltan Hajnal of UC San Diego.

U.S. protections for constitutional rights falling behind global peers

New research from the WORLD Policy Analysis Center at the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health (WORLD) shows that the United States is falling behind its global peers when it comes to guarantees for key constitutional rights. Researchers identified key gaps in the U.S. including guarantees of the right to health, gender equality, and rights for persons with disabilities.