For people of color in L.A., misinformation, past injustices contribute to vaccine hesitancy

New UCLA research finds that misinformation and politicization, awareness of past injustices involving medical research, and fears about the inequitable distribution of vaccines all contributed to hesitancy to be vaccinated among Los Angeles’ People of Color.

UCLA Fielding School Researchers Find Latino Californians of all Ages Among Hardest Hit by Pandemic

The COVID-19 surge of summer through winter 2020‒2021 devastated all population groups. Yet when the death rates of Latinos are compared to non-Hispanic white (NHW) rates in every age group, there is a significant disparity between the two: Latino death rates are from two to seven times higher than NHW rates.

Study Aims to (re)Define Latino Manhood and Masculinity

Researchers explored how 34 Latino undergraduate male students defined masculinity and manhood based on their own life experiences and looked at gender socialization, leadership and transfer experiences. Study results suggest including the importance of an approach to research and practice that engages Latino undergraduate male students via leadership development and involvement that is reflective of the way Latino masculine gender identity and leadership performance is socialized within the social construct of “familismo.”

UCLA to lead statewide coalition to address COVID-19’s impact on communities at risk

A coalition of 11 academic institutions and their community partners across California has received a $4.1 million grant from the NIH for a statewide community-engaged approach to addressing COVID-19 among populations that have been disproportionately affected by the pandemic.

New Study Examines Impact of COVID-19 Pandemic on Nevada Unemployment

UNLV political science professor John Tuman is available to speak about the findings of his new study examining the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on labor market conditions in Nevada. The research, published last week in the Early View section…

Paul Fleming & William Lopez: Why Hispanics are at higher risk to suffer health, economic consequences

FACULTY Q&AU.S. Hispanics are more likely than their white white counterparts to be affected by coronavirus independently of their immigration status. Two University of Michigan School of Public Health experts explain why, and offer some solutions the federal government could use to mitigate these negative consequences.Paul J.

Teaching Preschool Caregivers about Healthy Behaviors May Promote Healthier Lifestyle in Some High-Risk Groups

Study Shows Vascular Ultrasounds and Adhering to Interventional Education in Underserved Communities can Improve Health among Parents and School Staff