HOW MEASLES WIPES OUT THE BODY’S IMMUNE MEMORY

Study shows measles wipes out 20 to 50 percent of antibodies against an array of viruses and bacteria, depleting a child’s previous immunity
Measles-ravaged immune system must “relearn” how to protect the body against infections
Study details mechanism and scope of this measles-induced “immune amnesia”
Findings underscore importance of measles vaccination, suggesting those infected with measles may benefit from booster shots of all previous childhood vaccines

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Flu antibody protects against numerous and wide-ranging strains

A human antibody that protects mice against a wide range of lethal flu viruses could be the key to a universal vaccine and better treatments for severe flu disease, according to a new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City, and Scripps Research in La Jolla, Calif.

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Case Western Reserve University and University Hospitals Infectious Diseases Researcher Awarded NIH Contract to Accelerate TB Vaccine Development

CWRU’s W. Henry Boom, MD, and a team of collaborators nationally received the first installment of a seven-year contract, totaling $30 million in its first year from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases of the NIH, to establish three immunology research centers to accelerate TB vaccine development.

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Vaccine to Block Digestive Hormone May Slow Growth of Pancreatic Cancer

New research suggests a vaccine that blocks a digestive hormone may slow the spread of pancreatic cancer, potentially increasing survival rates. The study, published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology, was chosen as an APSselect article for October.

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Flu Experts at Johns Hopkins Medicine

As the 2019–20 flu season gets underway, Johns Hopkins Medicine experts will be available throughout the season to talk with your newsroom about the epidemiology of this year’s virus, as well as provide important information about this year’s vaccine. Flu cases have already begun to appear in the U.S. Flu activity tends to increase in October and can run as late as May.

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