triple negative breast cancer

Therapeutic resistance linked to softer tissue environment in breast cancer

Researchers at the University of California, San Francisco, have discovered that aggressive, triple-negative breast cancers (TNBCs) can evade treatment by reorganizing and softening the collagen matrix that surrounds the cancer cells. The study, which will be published April 2 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), shows that the softer matrix activates a signaling pathway that promotes the cancer cells’ survival, and suggests that targeting this pathway could enhance the effectiveness of chemo- and radiotherapy in TNBC patients.

Study Examines Genetic Testing in Diverse Young Breast Cancer Patients over a Decade

Researchers examined racial and ethnic differences in genetic testing frequency and results among diverse breast cancer patients diagnosed at age 50 or younger from January 2007 to December 2017. They found that among 1,503 diverse young breast cancer patients, less than half (46.2 percent) completed hereditary breast and ovarian cancer genetic testing. However, the percentage of women who completed genetic testing increased over time from 15.3 percent in 2007 to a peak of 72.8 percent in 2015.