Project begins to hire and retain more women, minority STEM faculty

Wichita State University continues to make strides toward improving opportunities for women in senior leadership, with women currently holding six out of 10 dean positions throughout the university.

Now WSU is taking an even bigger step to increase the number of women – and minorities – among its faculty with a $300,000 grant from the National Science Foundation.

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Journal Supplement Provides Valuable Resource to Support Diversity in the Field of Infectious Diseases

A new collection of articles highlighting the science and complexity of inclusion, diversity, access, and equity is now available online, part of an ongoing commitment to drive improvements within the field of infectious diseases and the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA). Published as a supplement to The Journal of Infectious Diseases (JID), the IDSA-sponsored collection includes articles written by both Society members and authors outside the field with deep knowledge and seasoned perspectives on these important issues.

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Could Duckweed Feed the World?

Climate change is threatening the world’s food supply and the risk of supply disruptions is expected to grow as temperatures rise, according to a new United Nations report co-authored by Rutgers human ecology professor Pamela McElwee. So, how would we feed everyone if the Earth’s population hits 9.7 billion in 2050 as projected? Duckweed, the world’s fastest-growing plant, which has more protein than soybeans and is a traditional food source for people living in parts of Southeast Asia, could be one of the key solutions, according to Eric Lam, a Distinguished Professor in the Department of Plant Biology in the School of Environmental and Biological Sciences at Rutgers University–New Brunswick.

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The Importance of Communicating About (Nuclear) Science

Communicating about science is a challenge. Bridging the gap between conversations with colleagues immersed in the language of the laboratory and audiences ranging from educated and curious to uninterested or even distrustful can be daunting. Add to that the potential consequences of miscommunication—particularly in high-stakes fields like nuclear materials management and nonproliferation, where political, safety, and security issues exacerbate the task—and some scientists might be tempted to run from the microphone. But scientists at the Institute for Nuclear Materials Management recently hosted two sessions on why it’s important to communicate, and tips for making it easier.

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