Is Your Alcohol Sanitizer Safe and Effective? Chula’s Pharmaceutical Science Has Developed a User-friendly and Rapid Test Kit to Keep People Away from COVID-19.

Chula Pharmaceutical Science helps increase public confidence to keep COVID-19 at bay with their new test kit to verify the safety and efficacy of hand sanitizers and alcohol-based gel and spray products.

Right off the bats

Among the many devastating impacts of Alzheimer’s disease and other types of dementia is the risk that patients will wander and become lost. Indeed, according to the Alzheimer’s Association, six in 10 people with the disease will wander at least once over the course of their illness — and many do so repeatedly.

Chronic Kidney Disease is Curable if Detected Early – Chula’s User-friendly CKD Screening Strips with Results in 15 minutes!

A Chula research team has developed a screening strip kit to detect the early stage of chronic kidney disease (CKD) that’s easy to use, yields quick results, increasing the chance of being cured for patients, and helping to cut over 10 billion baht of the ever-increasing annual healthcare costs for CKD patients. The CKD screening strip kits are expected to be released early next year.

National Healthy Skin Month: Dermatologists encourage regular skin checks

The American Academy of Dermatology highlights the importance of regular skin self-exams during National Healthy Skin Month this November. These exams help catch serious conditions early when they are most treatable. Research shows nearly one in four Americans have skin disease. Skin cancer remains the most common cancer in the United States with an estimated 9,500 people diagnosed every day.

George Washington University Launches First-Of-A-Kind Tool Providing Health Workforce Racial and Ethnic Diversity Data for 10 Professions

The Fitzhugh Mullan Institute for Health Workforce Equity at the George Washington University announced the launch today of the Health Workforce Diversity Tracker, an interactive online tool that provides extensive data on the diversity of recent graduates and the existing workforce across ten critical health professions.

Measuring the Speed of Sound in Dense Nuclear Matter

Theoretical physicists have proposed a new method to measure the speed of sound in quark-gluon plasma. The speed of sound is determined by a material’s properties, so measuring it helps scientists understand that material. These studies reveal the way quarks and gluons interact with each other and offers new insights on matter in the early Universe.

All-virtual CSAW 2021 features presentations on hardware vulnerabilities, integrated circuits, AI and more

The world has seen dozens of attacks in the past two years. The New York University Tandon School of Engineering’s annual CSAW games aims to prepare a new generation of cyber defenders in ways to address myriad software and hardware threats, from vulnerabilities in artificial intelligence (AI) systems, microchip theft, and more.

Millipede species, rarely documented in West Virginia, detected by WVU researchers as part of National Geographic project

Angie Macias, a doctoral student at West Virginia University, and Matt Kasson, an associate professor, are part of a National Geographic-funded project to study the fungal diversity associated with fungus-feeding millipedes.

Hero’s Encounter: Leading Geriatrician and World War II Veteran Share Bond

An internationally renowned geriatrician and advocate for seniors and a 98-year-old World War II veteran hero are a dynamic duo whose paths recently crossed. They have a common bond: to improve care and quality of life for Americans and people throughout the world.

Key witness helps scientists detect ‘spooky’ quantum entanglement in solid materials

Quantum entanglement occurs when two particles appear to communicate without a physical connection, a phenomenon Albert Einstein famously called “spooky action at a distance.” Nearly 90 years later, a team led by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory demonstrated the viability of a “quantum entanglement witness” capable of proving the presence of entanglement between magnetic particles, or spins, in a quantum material.

أهمية تمارين الإطالة خلال يوم العمل

بسبب جائحة فيروس كورونا المستجد (كوفيد-19)، أصبح من الصعب على بعض الأشخاص ممارسة تمارينهم اليومية. وقد يساهم السلوك الحضري، ومنه الجلوس لفترات طويلة من الوقت، في آثار صحية ضارة، بما في ذلك ما يُشار إليه باسم “أمراض الجلوس”.

Montefiore-Einstein Researchers Test Whether Molnupiravir Can Prevent COVID-19

As part of a recently launched international phase 3 clinical trial, Montefiore Health System and Albert Einstein College of Medicine are investigating whether the Merck antiviral pill, molnupiravir, now approved in Britain for treating COVID-19, can prevent COVID-19 in unvaccinated individuals living with people who have contracted the disease. Montefiore-Einstein is the first and only New York State site for the trial and was selected due to its diverse patient population and expertise in clinical trials of COVID-19 and other infectious diseases.

Predatory Bacteria, Eat Thy Neighbor

Ecologists know that adding more plant food that prey animals eat can also benefit predators. Scientists wanted to know if the same principles apply in bacterial food webs. They found that predatory bacteria grow faster and consume more resources than non-predators, and they use predatory behavior and physical features to hunt and feast on prey bacteria.

Exploring, Monitoring and Modeling the Deep Ocean

The NSF is funding a team led by the Oden Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences at UT Austin to implement a Deep-Ocean Observing Strategy (iDOOS), bringing together U.S. and international networks engaged in deep-ocean observing, mapping, exploration, modeling, research and sustainable management.

WVU, W.Va. Dept. of Education partnership advances K-12 classrooms computer science classes to among the top in the nation

A strong partnership between the West Virginia University Center for Excellence in STEM Education and the West Virginia Department of Education, along with rigorous statewide computer standards, has accelerated the Mountain State’s number of computer science classes offered in K-12 classrooms by 30% in two years, according to a new national report.

Underground tests dig into how heat affects salt-bed repository behavior

Scientists from Sandia, Los Alamos and Lawrence Berkeley national laboratories have just begun the third phase of a years-long experiment to understand how salt and very salty water behave near hot nuclear waste containers in a salt-bed repository.Salt’s unique physical properties can be used to provide safe disposal of radioactive waste, said Kristopher Kuhlman, a Sandia geoscientist and technical lead for the project.