The Science Behind the Shot: Biotech Tools Developed at Brookhaven Lab Fundamental to Making COVID-19 Vaccines

You’ve probably heard that the first two vaccines approved for battling COVID-19 in the United States use a relatively new approach—injections of simple packets containing mRNA, a genetic material that instructs our cells to make coronavirus spike proteins. But the technology for generating sufficient amounts of those mRNA packets dates back to the 1980s, when F. William Studier, then a senior biophysicist at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Brookhaven National Laboratory, developed a way to harness the molecular machinery of a very different virus.

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Penn State mourns the loss of Della Roy

The Penn State and materials research communities are mourning the loss of Della M. Roy, emeritus professor of materials science and a founding member of the Penn State Materials Research Laboratory (MRL), now the Materials Research Institute (MRI). Della died on March 27 at age 94. Della was known as an international leader in the field of cement and concrete research and for being a groundbreaker for women in science.

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Increase your Awareness of Head and Neck Cancers

Accounting for approximately four percent of all cancers nationwide according to the National Cancer Institute, head and neck cancer is the term used to describe a number of different malignant tumors that develop in or around the throat, larynx, nose, sinuses and mouth. Even though these cancers are not as prevalent as others, everyone should be aware of risk factors and symptoms.

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John Theurer Cancer Center Investigators Celebrate New Personalized Cell Therapy to Give Patients with Advanced Multiple Myeloma Hope

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration recently approved a new CAR-T therapy called idecabtagene vicleucel (ide-cel), or Abecma. It’s the first personalized cell therapy to treat patients with multiple myeloma no longer responsive to all standard previous types of therapy. This new therapy was assessed in the pioneering phase II clinical KarMMA trial, at Hackensack Meridian John Theurer Cancer Center at Hackensack Meridian Hackensack University Medical Center.

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UNH Researchers Develop Software to Monitor Ocean Soundscape Especially During COVID-19

An international development team, led by researchers at the University of New Hampshire, has created a user-friendly software program that can process sound data collected from the world’s oceans in a more standardized format that will enhance research and collaboration and help understand the global sea soundscape dynamics, including the impact of COVID-19 when travel and economic slowdowns put a halt to human activities in the ocean.

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Nation’s first quantum startup accelerator, Duality, launches at the University of Chicago’s Polsky Center and the Chicago Quantum Exchange

The University of Chicago’s Polsky Center for Entrepreneurship and Innovation and the Chicago Quantum Exchange today announced the launch of Duality, the first accelerator program in the nation that is exclusively dedicated to startup companies focused on quantum science and technology—a rapidly emerging area that is poised to drive transformative advances across multiple industries.

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The Future of Joint Replacement is Now

At Rush, orthopedic surgeons Vasili Karas, MD, MS, and Denis Nam, MD, are using new technology to perform joint replacement surgery. Karas and Nam have been using and studying three different types of robotic-assisted surgery in both knee replacement and hip replacement.

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Chula Successfully Trains the First “Sniffer Dogs to Find People Infected with COVID-19” in Thailand

Chulalongkorn Veterinary Science (CUVET) unveils its latest effort in training a pack of sniffer dogs to detect people with COVID–19. The project first six reached 95% accuracy, and are ready for duty at airports in support of the normal screening process.

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Supercomputer Calculations May Give First Look at the Structure of Two-Faced Pions

Pions consist of a quark paired to an antiquark and are the lightest particles to experience the strong force. But until recently scientists did not understand pions’ internal structure because of their short lifespan. Now, an advance in supercomputer calculations using lattice Quantum Chromodynamics may allow scientists to provide an accurate and precise description of pion structure for the first time.

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Understanding the Outsized Effect of Hydrogen Isotopes

Creating a fusion plasma requires deep understanding of the behavior of various isotopes of hydrogen. But plasma scientists have long been puzzled by a mysterious contradiction– the disconnect between theoretical predictions and experimental observations of how fusion energy confinement varies with the mass of hydrogen isotopes used to fuel the plasma. A new analysis has helped unravel this mystery.

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New Approach to Fault Tolerance Means More Efficient High-Performance Computers

High performance computer (HPC) systems are incredibly complex, with millions of cores. This creates many chances for small system faults that can affect HPC-based simulations and calculations. Researchers have developed a new approach to fault tolerance called coded computing that requires less time and less computer power to run than traditional fault tolerance solutions.

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Evolution Sets the Stage for More Powerful Spiking Neural Networks

Spiking neural networks (SNNs) closely replicate the structure of the human brain, making them an important step on the road to developing artificial intelligence. Researchers recently advanced a key technique for training SNNs using an evolutionary approach. This approach involves recognizing and making use of the different strengths of individual elements of the SNN.

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MacNeal Hospital Launches Food Surplus Project

MacNeal Hospital, located in Berwyn, Illinois and part of Loyola Medicine, has launched the Surplus Project to package excess hospital and cafeteria food for delivery to nearby shelters and transitional housing.

Each Tuesday and Thursday morning, staff volunteers pack individual meals and desserts – labeled with nutrition information, including allergens – along with beverages, fruit, vegetables and other available food. The group packs approximately 75 meals each day, or 150 meals a week, adhering to strict state and local food safety guidelines. (View a video on the Surplus Project).

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