American Cancer Society Releases Latest Cancer Statistics, Launches Initiative to Address Prostate Cancer Resurgence and Disparities

Today, the American Cancer Society released Cancer Statistics, 2023, the organization’s annual report on cancer facts and trends. According to the report, overall cancer mortality has dropped 33% since 1991, averting an estimated 3.8 million cancer deaths. Based on ACS data, in 2023 there are projected to be 1,958,310 new cancer cases and 609,820 cancer deaths in the United States.

What’s the Connection Between HPV and Cervical Cancer? And More Questions You’re Reluctant to Ask

Cervical cancer is often stigmatized due to its association with human papilloma virus (HPV), a sexually transmitted infection, however, HPV is extremely common, affecting most adults. Some people may also feel uncomfortable asking their doctor about sexual health .James K. Aikins, Jr., MD, FACOG, FACS, chief of Gynecologic Oncology at Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, answers questions about HPV, cervical cancer and more.

Are older women being over-screened for cervical cancer?

Analysis showed that in 2019 more than 1.3 million women received cervical cancer screening-associated services, such as a Pap test, colposcopy and other cervical procedures, after age 65. While these services cost more than $83 million, the researchers concluded they were of “unclear clinical appropriateness.”

Researchers Receive $3.2 Million to Study Efficacy of Mind-body Practices in Improving Pain, Surgical Outcomes

Can mind-body practices such as gentle yoga or self-reflection benefit patients undergoing surgery? It’s a question that researchers at Wake Forest University School of Medicine are examining with the support of a five-year, $3.2 million grant from the National Cancer Institute (NCI).

UTHealth Houston study: Lower cancer screening rates differ by region, tied to social vulnerability

Populations in U.S. counties defined as more vulnerable based on social factors including socioeconomic status and racial/ethnic minority status were significantly less likely to receive timely breast, cervical, and colorectal cancer screenings, according to research from UTHealth Houston.

Molecular Musical Chairs

The human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine is safe and effective – but it’s not for everyone. Michelle Ozbun, PhD, and her team at UNM Cancer Center published a research article earlier this year in Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy in which they describe how a drug called protamine sulfate blocks HPV infection. Like a game of musical chairs among molecules, the drug molecules bind to heparan sulfate cell receptors, preventing HPV virus particles from doing so.

Study Finds COVID-19 Pandemic Reduced Breast, Cervical, Colorectal Cancer Screenings by Millions in 2020

New findings led by researchers at the American Cancer Society show the number of women in the United States who reported having a recent (in the past year) breast cancer or cervical cancer screening dropped by 2.13 million (6%) and 4.47 million (11%) respectively in 2020 compared to 2018. The study is the first of its kind to evaluate the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on cancer screenings nationally using population-based data.

Women’s Wellness: Types of Gynecologic Cancers and their Warning Signs

September is Gynecologic Cancer Awareness Month. Rutgers Cancer institute of New Jersey Gynecologic Oncology Chief Dr. James Aikins reminds women about the types of gynecologic cancers and their warning signs

American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology discusses updated American Cancer Society guidelines on cervical cancer screening

Last year, the American Cancer Society (ACS) issued an updated set of guidelines for cervical cancer screening – emphasizing the shift toward screening with primary human papillomavirus (HPV) testing. While the ACS recommendation accounts for a transition period to implement primary HPV screening, additional factors should be considered to operationalize these guidelines, according to a special white paper in the July issue of the Journal of Lower Genital Tract Disease (JLGTD), official journal of ASCCP. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

MD Anderson Research Highlights for June 30, 2021

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center’s Research Highlights provides a glimpse into recently published studies in basic, translational and clinical cancer research from MD Anderson experts. Current advances include expanded use of a targeted therapy for a new group of patients with leukemia, molecular studies yielding novel cancer therapeutic targets, insights into radiation therapy resistance and a community intervention to reduce cervical cancer rates.

Sanford Burnham Prebys and other top U.S. cancer centers call for urgent action to get cancer-preventing HPV vaccination back on track

Sanford Burnham Prebys has joined doctors & scientists across America at National Cancer Institute (NCI)-designated cancer centers & other organizations to issue a joint statement urging the nation’s physicians, parents & young adults to get the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination back on track.

New article examines impact of a randomized trial on the use of minimally invasive surgery for cervical cancer

In a Correspondence to the New England Journal of Medicine, researchers found that many medical centers changed surgical practices for early cervical cancer based on findings from the LACC study in 2018, but non-academic medical centers could improve in making the change compared with academic centers.

Cervical Cancer Testing Tech Could Replace Pap Smears, Save Lives

Emerging technologies can screen for cervical cancer better than Pap smears and, if widely used, could save lives in areas where access to health care may be limited. In Biophysics Reviews, scientists at Massachusetts General Hospital write advances in nanotechnology and computer learning are among the technologies helping develop HPV screening that take the guesswork out of the precancer tests. That could mean better screening in places that lack highly trained doctors and advanced laboratories.

A World without Cervical Cancer: Preventive Medicine publishes special issue to further global efforts to eliminate deadly disease

Cervical cancer is a serious global health threat which kills more than 300,000 women every year. Recognizing this urgent public health issue, the editorial team of Preventive Medicine is publishing a special issue titled “From Science to Action to Impact: Eliminating Cervical Cancer,” which outlines the required courses of action to eliminate cervical cancer. Dr. Anna Giuliano and Dr. Linda Niccolai, two giants in the field of cervical cancer prevention research, served as guest editors for the issue.

Adding image guidance to post-operative radiation therapy can reduce side effects for women with cervical cancer

A phase III trial from India shows that an advanced radiation therapy technique leads to fewer gastrointestinal side effects in women who receive radiation after undergoing hysterectomy for cervical cancer. Findings from the PARCER trial (NCT01279135) will be presented today at the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) Annual Meeting.

Research News Tip Sheet: Story Ideas From Johns Hopkins Medicine

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Johns Hopkins Medicine Media Relations is focused on disseminating current, accurate and useful information to the public via the media. As part of that effort, we are distributing our “COVID-19 Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins” every other Tuesday.

What Every Woman Should Know About Preventing Gynecologic Cancers

The best defense against gynecologic cancer starts with preventative measures. When cancer is detected early, there is a better chance of having more effective treatment and better outcomes. While there is not a single screening test for all gynecologic cancers, learn about the ones that do exist.

HPV Vaccinations During Global Pandemic

Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted infection and the cause of most cervical cancers, and some vaginal, penile, anal and oral cancers. The HPV vaccine has proven effective in preventing infection and six types of HPV-attributable cancers. …

Managing Abnormal Results on Cervical Cancer Screening: ASCCP Issues Updated Guidelines

Replacing guidelines for managing women with abnormal results on cervical cancer screening test from 2012, new recommendations from ASCCP emphasize more precise management based on estimates of the patient’s risk – enabling more personalized recommendations for diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up. The revised guidelines with updated recommendations are now available in the Journal of Lower Genital Tract Disease (JLGTD), official journal of ASCCP. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

ASTRO issues first clinical guideline on radiation therapy for cervical cancer

A new clinical guideline from the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) provides recommendations for radiation therapy to treat patients with nonmetastatic cervical cancer. The guideline outlines indications and best practices for EBRT and brachytherapy in postoperative and definitive settings, and it also addresses chemotherapy and surgery when used in combination with radiation. The guideline is published online in Practical Radiation Oncology.

Daron G. Ferris, MD, to Receive 2020 Penn Nursing Renfield Foundation Award for Global Women’s Health

Daron G. Ferris, MD, the Founder of CerviCusco, will receive the 2020 Penn Nursing Renfield Foundation Award for Global Women’s Health for his dedication to cervical cancer prevention among the indigenous women in Cusco, Peru. Ferris created CerviCusco, a non-profit organization that ensures all women, including those with limited economic resources, have access to high quality and affordable health education and care, including screening, diagnosis, and treatment of cervical cancer. Ferris will receive the award – which comes with a $100,000 cash prize – during an event at the University of Pennsylvania on April 23, 2020.

The Truth About the HPV Vaccine: 7 Myths and Facts You Need to Know

A vaccine is available to protect against human papillomavirus (HPV). HPV is the most common sexually transmitted infection and can cause diseases such as genital warts and cancer.

The HPV vaccine now protects against nine strains of HPV. Research shows that the HPV vaccine is safe and effective.

The HPV vaccine is approved for men and women between the ages of 9 to 45. The HPV vaccine can protect adults from HPV-related diseases, however it provides the most protection when it is given in childhood before someone becomes sexually active.

Parents should talk with their child’s pediatrician about the HPV vaccine. Adult men should ask their primary care provider about the HPV vaccine, and adult women should speak with their gynecologist.

Anal cancer rates and mortality have risen dramatically among Americans

Rates of new anal cancer diagnoses and deaths related to human papillomavirus (HPV), the most common sexually transmitted infection, have increased dramatically over the last 15 years, according to researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth). The results of their study will be published in the November issue of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.