Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center Leads Collaborative Effort to End Lung Cancer Related Stigmas

Stigma can have profound and lasting effects, and studies have shown that people living with lung cancer may encounter challenges in receiving the support they need from their social network and healthcare providers. Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSK) is committed to helping eliminate the stigmas associated with a lung cancer diagnosis and is working to raise awareness in collaboration with other national organizations.

Dr. Taghrid Asfar, a Known Expert on Reducing Tobacco Use & Related Deaths, Available to Media

Taghrid Asfar, M.D., M.S.P.H., Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, part of the University of Miami Health System Associate Professor, Division of Epidemiology and Population Health Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences Dr. Asfar is an internationally known expert on reducing tobacco…

Study Shows Fewer People Tried to Quit Smoking During COVID-19 Pandemic

A new study led by researchers at the American Cancer Society shows serious smoking cessation activity declined among adults in the United States immediately after the onset of COVID-19 and persisted for over a year. Declines in attempts to quit smoking were largest among persons experiencing disproportionately negative outcomes during COVID-19, including Black people, people with comorbidities, middle-aged people, and lower educated people. The data was published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) Network Open.

Varenicline increases smoking cessation rates for African American smokers

Researchers at The University of Kansas Cancer Center have released the results of a clinical trial that examined the effectiveness of varenicline in African Americans. In their study published in JAMA, African American daily smokers who were given varenicline while receiving counseling had significantly greater quit rates than those who received a placebo.

Smoke Break: UNLV Study Strengthens Link Between Smoking and Increased Fracture Risk in Men

It’s no secret that puffing cigarettes is the culprit behind a host of ailments, including respiratory diseases and throat cancer. But a new UNLV study reveals that male smokers — who, demographically, are more likely than women to light up — are also placing themselves at a significantly increased risk of osteoporosis, bone fractures, and early death.

Smoking-cessation program that targets cancer patients effective

Researchers at Siteman Cancer Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found a way to help more patients who want to stop smoking. The successful strategy involves using electronic medical records to help identify smokers when they visit their oncologists and offering help with quitting during such visits.

An Educational Intervention Can Help Vapers Use Their E-Cigarettes to Quit Smoking, Moffitt Study Finds

In a new article published in The Lancet Public Health, they report results from a first-of-its kind nationwide study evaluating a targeted intervention aimed at transforming dual users’ e-cigarettes from a product that might maintain smoking into a tool that can be used to aid smoking cessation.

WashU Expert: FDA menthol ban would benefit Black, younger Americans

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s proposed ban on menthol-flavored cigarettes and all flavored cigars could be particularly beneficial for Black and young people, says an expert on tobacco control at Washington University in St. Louis.“Around 80% of adult Black smokers and more than half of people age 18-34 use menthol brands,” said Todd Combs, research assistant professor at the Brown School who works on the Advancing Science & Practice in the Retail Environment (ASPiRE) project, which uses agent-based modeling to test the potential impact of retail tobacco policies.

UC San Diego Researcher Studying Menthol Cigarettes Talks about FDA Ban

On April 29, 2021, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) proclaimed its ban on menthol cigarettes and all flavored cigars as a commitment to reduce addiction and youth experimentation, improve quitting among current smokers and address health disparities. Thanks…

Starting Smoking Cessation in Hospitalized Patients Would Reduce Many Premature Deaths

Each year in the U.S., about 30 million hospitalizations occur in individuals 18 and older. Of these, more than 7 million are current cigarette smokers whose average hospital stay is several days. Researchers say that starting smoking cessation therapy during hospitalization and maintaining high adherence post-discharge can markedly improve permanent quit rates in these patients with minimal to no side effects. Cessation therapy also should include long-term counseling and at least 90 days of a prescription drug, specifically, varenicline.

Quit the Hookah! Lung Damage, Inflammation Is Reversible with Smoking Cessation

New research finds that quitting smoking is an effective way to resolve impaired lung function and airway inflammation associated with waterpipe smoking. The study is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology-Lung Cellular and Molecular Physiology.

Emotional dependency on smoking-vaping combo differs from just smoking

Researchers have known that emotions play a critical, but complex role in shaping dependency on smoking and vaping. Now, a team of researchers report that emotions that trigger dependency for people who both smoke and vape may be different from people who just smoke, a finding that may one day help scientists create more personalized programs to help people quit tobacco smoking and vaping.

Protect Your Bladder: Quit Smoking

Your bladder probably isn’t your favorite topic of conversation, but knowing when to talk to your doctor about it is crucial to your health. If you experience frequent and/or painful urination, or you notice blood in your urine, telling your primary care provider is the first step to diagnosing a problem and finding the right care. More often than not, these symptoms are caused by non-life-threatening conditions like urinary tract infection, overactive bladder or, in men, an enlarged prostate. But they also could be symptoms of bladder cancer, the sixth most common form of cancer in the United States.

Experts Strongly Recommend Varenicline Over the Patch for Adult Smokers Hoping to Quit

Smoking cessation initiatives notwithstanding, along with provocative public health campaigns and clinical guidance, quitting tobacco has remained elusive for many smokers. The American Thoracic Society’s new clinical practice guideline on treatment for tobacco dependence in adults addresses how clinicians may deal with patients’ reluctance to quit, one of a number of issues not previously assessed in the older guidelines.

Continued nicotine use promotes brain tumors in lung cancer patients, Wake Forest study suggests

Researchers at Wake Forest School of Medicine have discovered that nicotine promotes the spread of lung cancer cells into the brain, where they can form deadly metastatic tumors. The study, which will be published June 4 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), suggests that nicotine replacement therapies may not be suitable strategies for lung cancer patients attempting to quit smoking. In addition, the researchers show that the naturally occurring drug parthenolide blocks nicotine-induced brain metastasis in mice, suggesting a potential therapeutic option in humans.

UniSA research uncovers treatment combo that sees smokers six times more likely to stop smoking and stay smoke-free

New research led by the University of South Australia has found that smokers who receive the medication varenicline tartrate combined with Quitline counselling following a period of hospitalisation due to a tobacco-related illness are six times more likely to quit smoking than those who attempt to stop without support.

Case Western Reserve researchers to lead Northeast Ohio initiative to prevent, detect and treat lung cancer in underserved communities

With a $2.75 million, three-year grant from the Bristol-Myers Squibb (BMS) Foundation, researchers from Case Western Reserve University will lead a community wide initiative to create and apply innovative methods to prevent and detect lung cancer in underserved residents in Northeast Ohio.

GW Experts Are Available to Speak for Stories during Lung Cancer Awareness Month

WASHINGTON (Oct. 30, 2019) — November is Lung Cancer Awareness Month and according to the American Cancer Society, more than 220,000 new cases of lung cancer are diagnosed each year. The George Washington University (GW) Cancer Center has various experts…

Low Rates of Tobacco Dependence Treatment in Patients Hospitalized with Substance Use Disorders

June 21, 2019 – Tobacco dependence is very common in patients hospitalized with substance use disorders (SUDs) – but most don’t receive recommended treatment for tobacco dependence while in the hospital, reports a study in the Journal of Addiction Medicine,…