‘Mother’s own milk’ for premature infants: Minority mothers need effective strategies

For premature infants who can’t breastfeed on their own, “mother’s own milk” (MOM) is by far the best nutrition. There’s an urgent need for effective ways to increase the relatively low rates of MOM feeding for preterm infants born to Black and Hispanic mothers. But so far, research has offered little or no specific guidance, concludes an evidence-based review in Advances in Neonatal Care, official journal of the National Association of Neonatal Nurses. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

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Study Shows Mother’s Diet May Boost Immune Systems of Premature Infants

Medical researchers have long understood that a pregnant mother’s diet has a profound impact on her developing fetus’s immune system and that babies — especially those born prematurely — who are fed breast milk have a more robust ability to fight disease, suggesting that even after childbirth, a mother’s diet matters. However, the biological mechanisms underlying these connections have remained unclear.

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Promoting and Protecting Human Milk and Breastfeeding During COVID-19

With stressors mounting daily on the health care system due to the COVID-19 pandemic, a de-prioritization of the childbearing family has been noted. Their care has changed, resulting in mothers forced to go through labor and birth without their partners, parents barred from NICU visitation, and discharge of mothers and newborns early without enough expert lactation care. There is great concern that these changes in childbearing families’ care may become permanent – to the detriment of the health of both mother and child.

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Separating newborns from their mothers with COVID-19 confers no significant benefit, may do long term harm, researchers find

Breastfeeding expert Melissa Bartick, MD, MS, FABM, a hospitalist at Mount Auburn Hospital and colleagues, provide new evidence that the benefits of keeping infants and mothers with suspected or confirmed COVID-19 together likely outweigh the risks of infection to babies born to mothers with COVID-19.

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Depressed Moms Who Breastfeed Boost Babies’ Mood, Neuroprotection and Mutual Touch

Feeding method and affectionate touch patterns in depressed and non-depressed mothers and babies as well as infant’s EEG activity showed that mother-infant affectionate touch differed as a function of mood and feeding method (breastfeeding and bottle-feeding). Infants in the depressed and bottle-fed group reduced touch toward their mothers while breastfeeding had a positive effect on both mother and baby. Infants of depressed and breastfeeding mothers showed neither behavioral nor brain development dysregulation previously found in infants of depressed mothers.

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Addressing Breastfeeding Disparities for African American Mothers

An abundance of data underscore the importance of breastfeeding and human milk for the optimal health of infants, children, mothers, and society. But while breastfeeding initiation rates have increased to more than 80% in the U.S., a disparity exists for African American mothers and infants. In this group, breastfeeding is initiated only about 69% of the time.

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How the Pandemic Disrupts Breastfeeding Experiences

The COVID-19 pandemic and the implications of physical distancing have disrupted new mothers’ birth and breastfeeding experiences even if they are not COVID-19 positive or a person awaiting results. In a new case series report from the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing (Penn Nursing), researchers share common concerns and experiences as reported by three first-time, healthy mothers regarding the disruption of their birth plans and breastfeeding experiences.

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Rutgers Cancer Institute Research: Breastfeeding is Safe for Breast Cancer Survivors of Reproductive Age

Is breastfeeding safe and possible for mothers who have a history of breast cancer? Investigators at Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey recently explored this question by conducting a systematic review on the feasibility and challenges of breastfeeding among breast cancer survivors of reproductive age.

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COVID-19 human milk studies should continue without stopping breastfeeding, researchers say

Scientists have launched a number of human milk and lactation studies to determine if SARS-CoV-2 can be transmitted to infants through human milk. Three scientists, including one from Washington University in St. Louis, wrote a new perspective article in the American Journal of Human Biology making the case for human milk studies co-created with the people whose milk is under investigation — and where study findings are interpreted in the context of real-life choices and experiences.

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Breastfeeding’s Legacy May Protect Against Diabetes

DALLAS – Aug. 25, 2020 – Breastfeeding secures delivery of sugar and fat for milk production by changing the insulin sensitivity of organs that supply or demand these nutrients, a new study led by UT Southwestern scientists suggests. The findings, published in this month’s print issue of Diabetes, could explain how different tissues cooperate to start and maintain lactation and offer strategies to help improve breastfeeding success for mothers who have insufficient milk production.

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Is COVID-19 Transmitted Through Breast Milk? Study Suggests Not Likely

A recent study by researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine suggests transmission of COVID-19 through breast milk is not likely. The infectious virus was not detected in 64 samples of breast milk tested.

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Rush University Medical Center and the Family Larsson-Rosenquist Foundation unveil open access, evidence-based PROVIDE Training Compendium to help healthcare professionals bring lifesaving mothers’ own milk to infants in intensive care

Rush University Medical Center, supported by the Family Larsson-Rosenquist Foundation, has produced a series of educational videos and mother-focused information sheets to train healthcare professionals in mothers’ own milk (MOM) feeding practices in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) worldwide.

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Diabetes Drug May Protect Breastfed Children from Future Metabolic Disorder

A new study suggests that treating a breastfeeding parent with a common diabetes drug may provide male offspring lifelong protection against diabetes and obesity. The study is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology-Endocrinology and Metabolism. It was chosen as an APSselect article for May.

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Breastfeeding Benefits During COVID-19

While the current coronavirus pandemic continues to affect all people, families will still give birth and bring new life into the world. During the COVID-19 crisis, breastfeeding and the provision of human milk to infants is recommended by national and international organizations because it is effective against infectious diseases: It strengthens the immune system by directly transferring antibodies from the mother.

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‘Breastfeeding Gap’ Exists Among Mexican-Origin Women Living in Texas

Mexican women born and educated in Mexico who now live in Texas breastfeed longer than those born and educated in the United States. That’s the finding from new research from the Texas Policy Evaluation Project (TxPEP) at The University of Texas at Austin, which points to a “breastfeeding gap” among some Mexican-origin women living in Texas.

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Breastfeeding Guide Aims to Help Docs Ease Moms Through Tough 1st Week

A new guide seeks to ensure healthcare providers are ready to help new mothers with the challenging first week of breastfeeding – and to address gaps in knowledge and support created in previous decades when breastfeeding was far less common.

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Initiating Breastfeeding in Vulnerable Infants

The benefits of breastfeeding for both mother and child are well-recognized, including for late preterm infants (LPI). But because LPI do not have fully developed brains, they may experience difficulties latching and/or sustaining a latch on the breast to have milk transfer occur. This means that these infants are at high risk for formula supplementation and/or discontinuation of breastfeeding.

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Study shows Texas leads in worksite lactation support initiatives

Texas is ranked in the top quarter of the U.S. for its worksite lactation support initiatives, according to research led by The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) School of Public Health. The study, published recently in the Journal of Human Lactation, was the first of its kind to identify and describe statewide worksite breastfeeding initiatives.

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