Making telemedicine more accessible to vulnerable, underserved populations

UCLA’s Dr. Alejandra Casillas has had a longtime interest in health disparities, with a particular focus on health communications among underserved and limited English proficient communities. This is what she’s doing about it.

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UCLA Health infectious disease experts tout critical role mask wearing plays in limiting spread of COVID-19

With thousands of new cases logged daily and a vaccine to fight COVID-19 still in development, UCLA Health infectious disease experts are encouraging people to continue to wear masks as the best method of protecting against virus transmission.

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Surgeon General expects COVID-19 vaccine to be available by year’s end

In a wide-ranging talk with UCLA Health physicians, Wednesday, Oct. 28, United States Surgeon General Jerome Adams, MD, MPH, addressed the politicization of the pandemic and the means of containing the spread of COVID-19. He also offered hope that a vaccine for the virus will be available by year’s end.

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UA Little Rock researchers investigate information campaigns designed to influence 2019 Canadian election

A group of researchers from the University of Arkansas at Little Rock have published an article that examined the possible use of online media campaigns orchestrated to influence the 2019 Canadian federal election. The article, “The Role of YouTube during the 2019 Canadian Federal Election: A Multi-Method Analysis of Online Discourse and Information Actors,” was published in the Journal of Future Conflict in September.

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ICE detention centers saw sustained outbreaks of vaccine-preventable diseases, says study

More than a dozen U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) detention centers experienced large, repeated outbreaks of vaccine-preventable illnesses in the last three years, according to a new study by researchers at UC San Francisco.

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Hospital floors are hotspot for bacteria, creating route of transfer to patients

The floors of hospital rooms are quickly and frequently contaminated with antibiotic-resistant bacteria within hours of patient admission, creating a route of transfer of potentially dangerous organisms to patients, according to a study published today as part of the proceedings from Decennial 2020: The Sixth International Conference on Healthcare-Associated Infections. Decennial 2020, an initiative of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America, was cancelled in March due to the pandemic.

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Colon cancer surgery performed by highly skilled surgeons improves long-term survival for patients

CHICAGO (October 30, 2020): Colon cancer patients achieve better five-year survival rates when the surgeons who treat them are rated as highly skilled, according to findings from what authors say is the first study to link a surgeon’s technical skills with improved long-term clinical outcomes. The study is published online in JAMA Oncology and virtually presented as part of the American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer’s Annual Research Paper Competition.

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Roswell Park Sees Suggestion of Benefit in First Clinical Trial to Combine Beta-Blocker and Checkpoint Inhibitor

The same biochemical triggers that spur a “fight or flight” response when we encounter threats may help tumor cells to thrive. A team of researchers from Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center is looking at ways to disrupt that dynamic so that cancer treatments can be more effective. Their latest work, published today in Clinical Cancer Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research, suggests that a drug widely prescribed to control blood pressure may improve patients’ response to cancer immunotherapy.

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New drone technology improves ability to forecast volcanic eruptions

Specially-adapted drones developed by an international team have been gathering data from never-before-explored volcanoes that will enable local communities to better forecast future eruptions.
The cutting-edge research at Manam volcano in Papua New Guinea is also improving scientists’ understanding of how volcanoes contribute to the global carbon cycle, key to sustaining life on Earth.

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SARS-CoV-2 might attack red marrow and block new erythrocytes formation

Specialists from the Department of Fundamental Medicine of Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU) with Russian and Japanese colleagues have probed into mechanisms of COVID-19 inside-the-body distribution linked to erythrocytes damaging. According to researchers, the virus might attack red marrow, thus being detrimental not only for erythrocytes in the bloodstream but also for the process of the formation of the new ones.

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Are a third of the excess deaths in 2020 not linked to COVID-19? Yes. Are they directly linked to the lockdown? It’s complicated.

The article accurately sites a study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association which examined the number of excess deaths in the U.S from March to August, which claimed a 20% increase. Nearly a third of that increase did not have the coronavirus as the underlying cause. However there is no scientific evidence that the deaths were a direct result of lockdown measures.

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¬Children With Asymptomatic Brain Bleeds As Newborns Show Normal Brain Development At Age 2

A study by UNC School of Medicine researchers finds that neurodevelopmental scores and gray matter volumes at age two years did not differ between children who had MRI-confirmed asymptomatic subdural hemorrhages when they were neonates, compared to children with no history of subdural hemorrhage.

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Infection by Confection: COVID-19 and the Risk of Trick-or-Treating

Researchers determined that COVID-19 transmission risk via Halloween candies is low, even when they are handled by infected people, but handwashing and disinfecting collected sweets reduces risk even further.

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Scientific Webinars on the Gut-Brain Connection Spotlight Spike in Research

ILSI North America, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and the American Society for Nutrition collaborated on a webinar series capturing the exponential growth of research on the brain, the gastrointestinal tract, and the gut microbiome—a connection characterized as the ‘gut-brain axis.’ This series highlights some of the latest research on the gut-brain axis affecting the work of nutritionists, researchers and other food and nutrition professionals.

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