Learn CPR and Lower Your Stress: Mount Sinai Cardiologists Emphasize Their Importance During American Heart Month

Doctors warn about lack of knowledge of administering CPR, especially in high-risk groups, and the rise of stress-related heart issues

Stem Cell Study Reveals How Neurons From PTSD Patients React to Stress

Stem cell-derived neurons from combat veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) react differently to a stress hormone than those from veterans without PTSD, a finding that could provide insights into how genetics can make someone more susceptible to developing PTSD following trauma exposure.

UAlbany Study: Pandemic Had Disproportionate Impact on Female Educators

A new study by University at Albany researchers found that female educators experienced the COVID-19 pandemic more negatively than their male counterparts. The study, which was conducted by NYKids, a research-practice partnership housed within the University’s School of Education, adds to emerging research that is finding the pandemic had a disproportionate impact on women in the workforce, who have dropped out at much higher rates than men.

What if some stress actually protects your body?

Stress has been linked to all sorts of serious health issues, from insomnia to high blood pressure, obesity and even heart disease. But it’s generally acknowledged that some stress can also be helpful, like when someone’s chasing a work deadline. But what if some level of stress can actually protect the body? A new study by researchers at the Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, with findings published Sept. 26 in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, suggests the immune system may benefit from a measure of stress.

Women’s mental well-being more sensitive to exercise than men’s during different stages of pandemic

Women’s mental health was more likely to be affected by physical exercise frequency during the COVID-19 pandemic than men’s, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York.

More Stress, Fewer Coping Resources for Latina Mothers Post-Trump

The sociopolitical climate in the United States has taken its toll on the mental health of Latina mothers, according to new research from the University of California San Diego. Findings show increased depression, anxiety and perceived stress in a border city and reduced coping resources in both a border and interior US city.

Nurses Remain Passionate Despite Historical Issues in Need of Reform, According to Annual Industry Survey

A national survey of 2,000 employed and student nurses showed that nurses remain passionate about patient care despite ongoing industry challenges. Areas of dissatisfaction include pay rates/ compensation (86 percent), staff shortages (53 percent), stress (39 percent) and burnout (35 percent). Results also showed that 28 percent of nurses indicated their desire to leave the profession had increased dramatically since the pandemic, while those who said their desire to stay had increased since the pandemic dropped from 24 percent last year to 4 percent this year.

Perfectionism May be a Risk Factor for Severe Alcohol Use Disorder, Novel Study Shows

Perfectionist traits — higher self-criticism, and unrealistic standards leading to isolation — are associated with severe alcohol use disorder (AUD), according to the first study directly comparing patients with AUD to a healthy control group. Perfectionist people strive for unrealistic performance standards and are prone to self-criticism.

JMIR Pediatrics and Parenting | Teleconsultation to Prevent Skin Conditions in Infants

JMIR Publications recently published “Effectiveness of Pediatric Teleconsultation to Prevent Skin Conditions in Infants and Reduce Parenting Stress in Mothers: Randomized Controlled Trial” in JMIR Pediatrics and Parenting which reported that mothers of infants are prone to experiencing parenting stress, which adversely affects mothers’ and children’s well-being. Additionally, studies have reported that atopic dermatitis (AD) among offspring enhances parenting stress, and postnatal maternal psychological problems can increase the risk of AD in children.

APA poll shows employees plan to seek workplaces with mental health supports

Eight in 10 U.S. workers say that how employers support their employees’ mental health will be an important consideration when they seek future job opportunities, while 71% believe their employer is more concerned about the mental health of employees now than in the past, according to a survey from the American Psychological Association.

Pineapple Jelly Probiotics Health Drink for Elderly Adults that Can Help Fix Farmers’ Problems

A team of researchers from Chula Faculty of Science in cooperation with the Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University has developed the “Jelly Nata Probiotics” jelly drink made from pineapple to benefit the mental wellbeing of the elderly, add value to pineapple while also solving the oversupply of pineapples.

COVID-19 shelter-in-place orders served to decrease adolescent drinking

During the COVID-19 pandemic, policy interventions designed to reduce the virus’ spread included shelter-in-place (SIP) orders and phased “reopenings” of public spaces. Knowing that adult alcohol and substance use generally rose during the pandemic due to factors such as stress, boredom, worsening mental health, and increased alcohol availability, a new study sought to understand the impact of SIPs and reopenings on adolescent alcohol use in California. Analysis shows SIP decreased frequency of alcohol use. Also, compliance with SIP orders was associated with decreased frequency and quantity of use.

Trauma history and alcohol’s effects on the brain combine to make women more vulnerable to alcohol use disorders

Prior research has demonstrated greater addiction vulnerability in women; for example, women advance from casual substance use to addiction at a faster rate, experience more severe withdrawal symptoms, exhibit higher rates of relapse, and have less treatment success than men. A new study shows that biobehavioral interactions in alcohol use disorders (AUDs) among women are cyclical in nature: women’s greater risk of personal histories of trauma coupled with a greater vulnerability to alcohol-related brain deficits can lead to more severe AUD effects.

Amid surgical mesh concerns, surgeons are asked: What treatment would you choose for yourself?

There is a long history of confusion and controversy regarding the use of polypropylene mesh materials for pelvic floor disorders in women, such as stress urinary incontinence (SUI) or pelvic organ prolapse (POP). So what option would specialist surgeons choose if they were to undergo these procedures themselves? That’s the question asked in a survey study in Urology Practice®, an Official Journal of the American Urological Association (AUA). The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

Addressing stress and postpartum symptoms early may reduce risk for type 2 diabetes in women with gestational diabetes

Addressing stress early on in postpartum women who recently experienced gestational diabetes might help curb an increased risk for type 2 diabetes, according to research being presented Sunday, June 12 at ENDO 2022, the Endocrine Society’s annual meeting in Atlanta, Ga.

Gratitude Expressions Between Co-Workers Improve Cardiovascular Responses to Stress

A study from the University of California San Diego’s Rady School of Management finds teammates who thanked each other before performing a high-stress task had a better cardiovascular response compared to teams who did not express gratitude. The enhanced cardiovascular response leads to increased concentration, more confidence, allowing individuals to give their peak performance.

Cancer and mental health: Mayo Clinic expert dispels myths

Everyone with cancer experiences it differently and all emotions are valid and important, regardless of the mix or intensity. Shawna Ehlers, Ph.D., a Mayo Clinic psychologist and psycho-oncology expert, helps patients cope with the burden of their cancer diagnosis. That includes dispelling myths that stress in their lives caused their cancer or that depression must be suffered through during cancer treatment.

Parents’ mental health was worse during pandemic, study finds

While having a child attend a private school or school with above-average instructional quality was associated with better mental health of parents during the COVID-19 pandemic, hybrid school was associated with worse parental mental health, as was working from home, finds a new study from the Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis.

NSF supports research studying how Russia’s invasion of Ukraine affects Americans

Irvine, Calif., May 2, 2022 — The National Science Foundation has awarded a Rapid Response Research grant of nearly $175,000 to University of California, Irvine researchers seeking to gauge the effect that the reporting of Russia’s invasion of Ukraine in traditional and social media outlets has on the mental health of U.S. citizens.

Stress during Pregnancy May Lead to Heart Disease, Accelerated Aging in Next Generation

Prenatal stress can cause damage in the aorta in offspring, which may contribute to the development of atherosclerosis and accelerate aging, according to a new study in mice. The article is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology-Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology.

Study: COVID Tech Took a Toll on Work-from-Home Moms

Research by UNLV communications expert Natalie Pennington finds that texts, video calls burdened the mental health of working moms during pandemic.

Tips to reduce holiday stress as we “return to normal” this year

Holiday gatherings this year will mean a somewhat “return to normal,” so it’s best to be prepared mentally before meeting with friends and family. Here are some tips to help reduce holiday stress and create a more positive holiday experience…

Roswell Park Researchers Identify Key Link Between Stress and Cancer

Stress can have a significant negative effect on health, but our understanding of how stress impacts the development and progression of cancer is just beginning. A team from Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center has identified an important mechanism by which chronic stress weakens immunity and promotes tumor growth. Their findings, just published in Cell Reports, point to the beta-adrenergic receptor (β-AR) as a driver of immune suppression and cancer growth in response to stress, opening the possibility of targeting this receptor in cancer therapy and prevention.

PTSD symptoms vary over course of menstrual cycle

In women who have experienced trauma, post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms may vary over the course of the menstrual cycle, with more symptoms during the first few days of the cycle when the hormone estradiol is low, and fewer symptoms close to ovulation, when estradiol is high, finds research published by the American Psychological Association.

Nurse, Heal Thyself – Spiritual Practices in the Midst of a Pandemic

For nurses on the frontline, the COVID-19 pandemic has been especially disparaging, challenging and even life altering. Nurses have worked extremely long hours faced not only with the excessive, increased number of deaths of their patients, who were dying alone, but also grieved the loss of coworkers. Researchers explored the use of spirituality and religion in nurses on the frontline as a way to find purpose and meaning in life, especially during times of heightened stress and uncertainty.