Does Living in America’s Wealthiest Communities Make You Safer?

Nationwide study published in Risk Analysis, compares the concentration of hazards and risks for the richest and poorest counties and municipalities in all 50 states (200 locations). Wealthier communities face higher economic consequences from natural hazard events compared to the poorest, mostly rural communities. The lowest-income municipalities have fewer impact from natural hazards, but at least 50% higher suicide and homicide rates, and firearm fatalities.

Medicaid Expansion Associated with Increased, But Not High Quality, Screening for Alcohol Use

People living in states with expanded Medicaid access were more likely to be screened by their doctor for alcohol use compared to people who lived in states that did not expand Medicaid access, but they did not necessarily receive effective interventions. A study published in Alcohol: Clinical and Experimental Research found that living in a state with expanded Medicaid access was associated with a higher prevalence of lower-income adults’ receiving some alcohol screening at a recent checkup but not receiving higher quality screening or brief counseling. The authors suggest that expanded Medicaid access may increase screening via increased access to primary care but that policies that target healthcare provider constraints are also needed to increase high-quality, evidence-based screening and counseling around alcohol use.

UC Irvine Labor Center opens on campus

The University of California, Irvine has opened a new campus center that will provide timely and policy-relevant labor research, will educate the next generation of labor and community leaders, and will advance labor and workers’ rights initiatives. Modeled after existing centers at UCLA, UC Berkeley and UC Merced, the UCI Labor Center builds upon previous campus efforts to investigate low-wage worker sectors in Orange County.

UC Irvine receives most applications in campus history for third year in a row

Irvine, Calif., Feb. 24, 2023 — The University of California, Irvine has received more than 143,000 applications for fall 2023, setting a campus record for the third consecutive year and continuing to solidify its position as one of the most desired schools in the country. It also places UCI among the top four universities in the nation for the most freshman applications since 2015.

UCI researcher gets NSF-backed grant to study wildfires’ effects on farmworkers

Michael Méndez of the University of California, Irvine has received a two-year, $400,000 grant from the National Center for Atmospheric Research’s Early Career Faculty Innovator Program. It will fund a joint project with researchers at NCAR – which is sponsored by the National Science Foundation – exploring the disparate treatment of undocumented Latino/Latina and Indigenous migrant farmworkers during extreme wildfire events in Sonoma County.

Antibody screening finds COVID-19 nearly 7 times more prevalent in O.C. than thought

Irvine, Calif., Oct. 28, 2020 — Testing a representative sample of Orange County residents for a wide range of coronavirus antibodies, University of California, Irvine researchers found that 11.5 percent of them have antibodies for COVID-19, in contrast to previous estimates of less than 2 percent. Latino and low-income residents had the highest prevalence of SARS-CoV-02 antibodies with rates of 17 percent and 15 percent, respectively.