Poor Grasp of Dating Violence in College Perpetuates ‘Boys Will be Boys’ Views

A study to understand the dating violence experience and perpetration of college-age women, as well as how they conceptualize violence in dating relationships, reveals normalization of unhealthy violent behaviors where sexual pressure or sexualized verbal harassment are viewed as an innate part of men, supporting the idea that “boys will be boys.” Study participants demonstrated a lack of knowledge of the forms of dating violence and its consequences. They accepted, rationalized and provided excuses for these acts of violence.

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COVID-19 pandemic has increased loneliness and other social issues, especially for women, Mayo research finds

Social distancing guidelines have reduced the spread of COVID-19, but lockdowns and isolation also have created or aggravated other well-being concerns, reports new research. Mayo Clinic investigators found a significant increase in loneliness and a decrease in feelings of friendship during the pandemic.

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UNH Research: No Second Chance to Make Trusting First Impression, or is There?

It’s important to make a good first impression and according to research at the University of New Hampshire a positive initial trust interaction is helpful in building a lasting trust relationship. Researchers found that trusting a person early on can have benefits over the life of the relationship, even after a violation of that trust. However, equally interesting was that if people were not trusted during a first meeting, there were still opportunities to build trust in the future.

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People Who Experienced Parental Divorce as Children Have Lower ‘Love Hormone’ Levels than Those Who Did Not

People who were children when their parents were divorced showed lower levels of oxytocin — the so-called “love hormone” — when they were adults than those whose parents remained married, according to a study led by Baylor University. That lower level may play a role in having trouble forming attachments when they are grown.

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When it comes to happiness, what’s love got to do with it?

How accurate was William Shakespeare when he said, “‘Tis better to have loved and lost than never to have loved at all,”? Researchers from Michigan State University conducted one of the first studies of its kind to quantify the happiness of married, formerly married and single people at the end of their lives to find out just how much love and marriage played into overall well-being.

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Quarantine, stress from COVID-19 pandemic may lead to increased intimate partner violence

The coronavirus has caused millions of people around the world to quarantine to prevent the spread of the virus, but

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Love Under Lockdown: How Couples Can Cope During COVID-19

For many, love has long been associated with flowers, candy, and counting down the hours until they see their crush or significant other again. During the age of coronavirus? Just like every other part of life, the mechanics of romance have changed. Newly dating partners are longing for one another after weeks apart due to the quarantine; longtime cohabitating and married couples are spending more time together than ever, deepening bonds for many while some could use a breather from seeing their (not so) loved one’s face.

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Social Media While Social Distancing: A How-To Guide

With calls from elected and health officials to self-isolate to prevent the spread of coronavirus, more and more people are turning to social media as their primary means of entertainment and connection with friends and the outside world. But can too much social media while social distancing take a toll on your mental and even physical health? We checked in with Natalie Pennington — a UNLV communication studies professor who researches the benefits and harms of social media — to get her take on the best ways to make your online experience work for you.

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Feeling obligated can impact relationships during social distancing

In a time where many are practicing social distancing from the outside world, people are relying on their immediate social circles more than usual. Does a sense of obligation — from checking on parents to running an errand for an elderly neighbor — benefit or harm a relationship? A Michigan State University study found the sweet spot between keeping people together and dooming a relationship.

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A prescription for the pain of rejection: Acetaminophen and forgiveness

The emotional distress that often accompanies a breakup is called social pain, and it may cause sadness, depression and loneliness, as well as actual physical pain, research has shown.

A study, published recently in the Annals of Behavioral Medicine may have found an antidote – forgiveness combined with acetaminophen, the active ingredient in Tylenol.

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Many Teens are Victims of Digital Dating Abuse; Boys Get the Brunt of It

It’s almost Valentine’s Day, but there is nothing romantic about new research illuminating how teen dating abuse is manifesting online. A study of U.S. middle and high school students showed that 28.1 percent had been the victim of at least one form of digital dating abuse. More than one-third had been the victim of traditional dating abuse (offline). Boys in heterosexual relationships experienced all forms of digital dating abuse more than girls and were even more likely to experience physical aggression.

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‘Financial infidelity’: What defines it, who is at risk, and what are the consequences?

Romantic partners aren’t always honest about money in their relationships, but when does hiding purchases, debt and savings constitute “financial infidelity”? Research by professors at four universities, including Indiana University, defines the concept and provides a means for predicting its occurrence within relationships.

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