High risk of divorce after TBI? Not necessarily, study suggests

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) has a major impact on the lives of affected patients and families. But it doesn’t necessarily lead to an increased risk of marital instability, as two-thirds of patients with TBI are still married to the same partner 10 years after their injury, reports a study in the July/August issue of the Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation (JHTR). The official journal of the Brain Injury Association of America, JHTR is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

When it comes to happiness, what’s love got to do with it?

How accurate was William Shakespeare when he said, “‘Tis better to have loved and lost than never to have loved at all,”? Researchers from Michigan State University conducted one of the first studies of its kind to quantify the happiness of married, formerly married and single people at the end of their lives to find out just how much love and marriage played into overall well-being.

Pandemic Effects on Marriage and Relationships

Expert commentary from Paula Pietromonaco, professor emerita at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, whose primary research focus is to understand the processes through which interactions in marital relationships shape each partner’s emotional and physical health. https://www.psychologicalscience.org/news/backgrounders/backgrounder-marriage-and-relationships.html What does psychological science say…

Love Under Lockdown: How Couples Can Cope During COVID-19

For many, love has long been associated with flowers, candy, and counting down the hours until they see their crush or significant other again. During the age of coronavirus? Just like every other part of life, the mechanics of romance have changed. Newly dating partners are longing for one another after weeks apart due to the quarantine; longtime cohabitating and married couples are spending more time together than ever, deepening bonds for many while some could use a breather from seeing their (not so) loved one’s face.

Feeling obligated can impact relationships during social distancing

In a time where many are practicing social distancing from the outside world, people are relying on their immediate social circles more than usual. Does a sense of obligation — from checking on parents to running an errand for an elderly neighbor — benefit or harm a relationship? A Michigan State University study found the sweet spot between keeping people together and dooming a relationship.