Changing Diets — Not Lower Physical Activity or Infectious Disease Burden — May Best Explain Global Childhood Obesity Crisis

Variation in consumption of market-acquired foods outside of the traditional diet — but not in total number of calories burned daily — is reliably related to indigenous Amazonian children’s body fat, according to a Baylor University study that offers insight into the global obesity epidemic.

Read more

Rapid blood test identifies COVID-19 patients at high risk of severe disease

Scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have shown that a relatively simple and rapid blood test can predict which patients with COVID-19 are at highest risk of severe complications or death. The blood test measures levels of mitochondrial DNA, which normally resides inside the energy factories of cells. Mitochondrial DNA spilling out of cells and into the bloodstream is a sign that a particular type of violent cell death is taking place in the body.

Read more

Drug-Induced Liver Injury, Translational microRNA Biomarkers, and More Featured in January 2021 Toxicological Sciences

in the January 2021 issue, Toxicological Sciences offers an engaging slate of research in toxicology, from endocrine toxicology and biomarkers to genetic and epigenetic toxicology and mixtures toxicology.

Read more

Southwestern Health Resources Accountable Care Network Listed No. 1 in U.S. for Medicare Savings for Third Straight Year

DALLAS – January 15, 2021 – The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) announced that the Southwestern Health Resources Accountable Care Network (SWHR) saved more than $52 million in 2019. These generated savings place it at the top of organizations participating in the CMS Next Generation Accountable Care Organization (ACO) Model. SWHR has saved nearly $120 million since joining the Next Generation program in 2017.

Read more

COVID-19 deaths really are different. But best practices for ICU care should still apply, studies suggest.

COVID-19 deaths are indeed different from other lung failure deaths, according to two recent studies, with 56% of COVID-19 patients dying primarily from the lung damage caused by the virus, compared with 22% of those whose lungs fail due to other causes. But, the researchers conclude, the kind of care needed to help sustain people through the worst cases of all forms of lung failure is highly similar, and just needs to be fine-tuned.

Read more