Brain Activity Helps Explain Response to Alcohol and How People Recognize Emotions Before Becoming Intoxicated

People who need to drink relatively high amounts of alcohol before feeling its effects, a genetically influenced risk factor for future heavy drinking and alcohol problems, may have differences in brain connectivity that impair their ability to interpret facial expressions and recognize their own intoxication, a new study suggests. The paper, in Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research, is believed to be the first to demonstrate differences in brain connectivity between people with low and high responses to alcohol. Varying levels of responses to alcohol — for example, how many drinks a person consumes before feeling intoxicated — are known to be related to neurobiological processing. Low responders, who drink more alcohol before feeling affected by it, are at greater risk of alcohol use disorder (AUD) than high responders, who feel the effects of fewer drinks. Scientists using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) are exploring the possibility that low responders are less a

Chula Economics Lecturer Receives International Anti-Corruption Award 2021

Congratulations to Asst. Prof. Dr. Torplus Yomnak on becoming one of the 12 anti-corruption activists from around the world to receive the U.S. State Department’s International Anti-Corruption Champion Award 2021 on International Anti-corruption Day. Asst. Prof. Dr. Torplus, the Director of the Political Economics Studies Center, Faculty of Economics, Chulalongkorn University, was chosen as the academic award recipient from Southeast Asia.

How would eliminating race-based adjustments in estimates of kidney function impact clinical trials?

• In an analysis of data from a recent clinical trial, researchers found that removing a race-based adjustment in the estimation of individuals’ kidney function had a small but potentially important impact on the inclusion of participants, with differing effects on Black and non-Black participants.
• Removal of the race-based adjustment also influenced inclusion parameters such as participants’ severity of kidney function impairment at baseline as well as their risk of developing cardiovascular- and kidney-related outcomes.

Krzysztof Gawędzki, Antti Kupiainen Share 2022 Dannie Heineman Prize for Mathematical Physics

AIP and APS announce Krzysztof Gawędzki and Antti Kupiainen as the recipients of the 2022 Dannie Heineman Prize for Mathematical Physics. The prize is awarded annually to recognize significant contributions to the field of mathematical physics. The citation on their award reads: “for fundamental contributions to quantum field theory, statistical mechanics, and fluid dynamics using geometric, probabilistic, and renormalization group ideas.” The prize will be presented at either the APS March Meeting in Chicago or the APS April Meeting in New York City.

Is Your Alcohol Sanitizer Safe and Effective? Chula’s Pharmaceutical Science Has Developed a User-friendly and Rapid Test Kit to Keep People Away from COVID-19.

Chula Pharmaceutical Science helps increase public confidence to keep COVID-19 at bay with their new test kit to verify the safety and efficacy of hand sanitizers and alcohol-based gel and spray products.

Frying Your Turkey This Thanksgiving? Loyola Medicine Tips to Prevent a Serious Burn Injury

As we approach the Thanksgiving holiday, Joshua Carson, MD, regional director of Loyola Medicine’s Burn Center is reminding everyone to be vigilant to prevent burn injuries around the holidays. Loyola’s Burn Center is the largest in Illinois and is a regional leader in treating adult and pediatric burns and trauma.

English Learners Face Severe Inequities and Substandard Conditions in NJ Schools

English learners (ELs) in New Jersey public schools, already facing inadequate supports and a lack of attention, missed out on critical services during the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a report released today by the NJ Consortium for Immigrant Children (NJCIC), NJ Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages/NJ Bilingual Educators (NJTESOL/NBE), and Education Law Center (ELC).

Right off the bats

Among the many devastating impacts of Alzheimer’s disease and other types of dementia is the risk that patients will wander and become lost. Indeed, according to the Alzheimer’s Association, six in 10 people with the disease will wander at least once over the course of their illness — and many do so repeatedly.

Study: COVID Tech Took a Toll on Work-from-Home Moms

Research by UNLV communications expert Natalie Pennington finds that texts, video calls burdened the mental health of working moms during pandemic.

COVID-19 vaccine elicits weak antibody response in people taking immunosuppressant

People taking TNF inhibitors, a kind of immunosuppressive drug used to treat rheumatoid arthritis and other autoimmune conditions, produced a weaker and shorter-lived antibody response after two doses of Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine, according to a study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. A third vaccine dose drove antibody levels back up, indicating that this additional dose may provide protection as the virus’s delta variant continues to spread.

Tips to reduce holiday stress as we “return to normal” this year

Holiday gatherings this year will mean a somewhat “return to normal,” so it’s best to be prepared mentally before meeting with friends and family. Here are some tips to help reduce holiday stress and create a more positive holiday experience…

Chronic Kidney Disease is Curable if Detected Early – Chula’s User-friendly CKD Screening Strips with Results in 15 minutes!

A Chula research team has developed a screening strip kit to detect the early stage of chronic kidney disease (CKD) that’s easy to use, yields quick results, increasing the chance of being cured for patients, and helping to cut over 10 billion baht of the ever-increasing annual healthcare costs for CKD patients. The CKD screening strip kits are expected to be released early next year.

Two markers help predict head and neck cancer prognosis

A new study from the University of Michigan Health Rogel Cancer Center finds circulating tumor DNA, or ctDNA, levels can predict as early as two weeks after starting treatment which patients are likely to have good outcomes. At the same time, specialized MRI and PET scans two weeks after starting chemoradiation also correlated with outcomes.

Researchers Use Model of Hypothalamus to Implicate Genes Associated with Sleep, BMI, Puberty, and More

A new study has implicated several genes involved in a variety of bodily functions associated with the hypothalamus, a notoriously difficult-to-study region of the brain. The findings could help clinicians identify potential causes of dysfunction for many important traits regulated by the hypothalamus, such as sleep, stress, and reproduction.