Persistent COVID-19 infections in immunocompromised people may give rise to variants of concern

In an article in the New England Journal of Medicine, scientists from Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Medicine, the U.S. Military HIV Research Program and the Institute for Global Health and Infectious Diseases at the University of North Carolina urged increased attention to persistent COVID-19 infections in immunocompromised people.

Scientists show a single catalyst can perform the first step of turning CO2 into fuel in two very different ways

Scientists at Stanford and SLAC made a new catalyst that works with either heat or electricity to accelerate a reaction for turning carbon dioxide into carbon monoxide. It’s an important step toward unifying the understanding of catalytic reactions in these two very different conditions.

Novel Model Predicts COVID-19 Outbreak Two Weeks Ahead of Time

People’s social behavior, reflected in their mobility data, is providing scientists with a way to forecast the spread of COVID-19 nationwide at the county level. Researchers have developed the first data-driven deep learning model with the potential to predict an outbreak in COVID-19 cases two weeks in advance. Feeding the mobility data to epidemiological forecasting models helps to estimate COVID-19 growth as well as evaluating the effects of government policies such as mandating masks on the spread of COVID-19.

Mount Sinai Mobile Interventional Stroke Team Travels to Patients, Resulting in Faster Treatment and Better Outcomes

Study finds stroke patients are nearly twice as likely to be functionally independent if treated by a specialized team that travels to them to perform surgical clot removal

Study Confirms Effectiveness of New Personalized Approach for Radiation Therapy

Researchers from Cleveland Clinic, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, and Moffitt Cancer Center have found that the genomic adjusted radiation dose (GARD) may be used to personalize radiotherapy (RT) to maximize the therapeutic effect of a given physical RT dose. This research was published Aug. 4 in The Lancet Oncology journal.

Considering More Than One Joint Replacement to Relieve Arthritis Pain?

When Lorry Graham needed multiple joint replacement surgeries for severe arthritis pain, she turned to Dr. Geoffrey Westrich at Hospital for Special Surgery. Mrs. Graham, who jokingly refers to herself as a “bionic woman,” and Dr. Westrich explain what to expect and give advice for the best outcome.

Muscle Protein That Makes Vertebrates More Fit Linked to Limited Lifespan

Researchers from Johns Hopkins Medicine say they have added to evidence that a protein called CaMKII improves strength, endurance, muscle health and fitness in young animals. Their experiments working with mice and fruit flies, however, found that the gene for CaMKII also contributes to an evolutionary tradeoff: increased susceptibility to age-associated diseases, frailty and mortality.

New Approach Methodologies, Single Cell RNAseq, and More Featured in 2021 Toxicological Sciences

Toxicological Sciences delivers cutting-edge research in toxicology in the areas of clinical and translational toxicology, emerging technologies, and more in the August 2021 issue.

American Society of Anesthesiologists and Anesthesia Patient Safety Foundation Say Preoperative Testing for COVID-19 is Essential, Regardless of Vaccination

All patients undergoing non-emergency surgeries or procedures should continue to have preoperative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing for SARS-CoV-2, irrespective of vaccination status, according to an updated guidance from the American Society of Anesthesiologists and Anesthesia Patient Safety Foundation.

For Older LGBTQ+ Adults, Entering a Nursing Home Can Feel Like Coming out All Over Again

A research team at Rush University Medical Center set out to find out how older LGBTQ+ adults felt in long-term care facilities and what guidelines were in place in these facilities to protect its residents.

August is National Breastfeeding Month: @UCSDHealth Experts on Health Benefits and Latest in COVID-19 Research

August is National Breastfeeding Month, intended to raise awareness of the health benefits that breast milk provides, including: Reduction in Sudden Infant Death Syndrome Fewer infections: ear, respiratory, diarrhea, bladder, meningitis Decrease in childhood obesity Reduction in diabetes, celiac disease,…

Scaling the Model of Care for Patients with Opioid Use Disorder

Data show that concurrent with the opioid overdose crisis, there has been an increase in hospitalizations of people with opioid use disorder (OUD). One in ten of these hospitalized medical or surgical patients have comorbid opioid-related diagnoses.

Wayne State researcher awarded $3.3 million from DOE to advance quantum science and technology

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced recently $73 million in funding to advance quantum information science research to aid in better understanding the physical world and harness nature to benefit people and society. Aaron Rury, Ph.D., assistant professor of chemistry in Wayne State’s College of Liberal Arts and Science, is the recipient of one of 29 projects funded by the DOE.

Common Weight-Loss Drug Successfully Targets Fat That Can Endanger Heart Health

DALLAS – August 4, 2021 – Researchers at UT Southwestern announced successful results of a clinical trial for a commonly prescribed weight-loss drug called liraglutide. In adults who are overweight or have obesity combined with high cardiovascular risk, once-daily liraglutide combined with lifestyle interventions significantly lowered two types of fat that have been associated with risk to heart health: visceral fat and ectopic fat.

Barriers to Voting in Elections Linked to Increased Odds of Being Uninsured

Groups commonly targeted by voting restriction laws—those with low incomes, who are racial minorities, and who are young—are also less likely to be insured in states with more voting restrictions, according to a study by researchers at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health and University of Alberta School of Public Health, Edmonton, Canada.

CHOP Researchers Develop Coating for Endotracheal Tubes that Releases Antimicrobial Peptides

In a proof-of-concept study, researchers at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) have created a coating that can be applied to endotracheal tubes and release antimicrobial peptides that target infectious bacteria with specificity. The innovation could reduce upper-airway bacterial inflammation during intubation, a situation that can lead to chronic inflammation and a condition called subglottic stenosis, the narrowing of the airway by an accumulation of scar tissue. The findings were published recently in the journal The Laryngoscope.

Graphic Warning Labels on Cigarette Packaging Changes Perceptions

A Herbert Wertheim School of Public Health and Human Longevity Science at University of California San Diego clinical trial showed that graphic warning labels on cigarette packaging changes perceptions of smokers to recognize the negative consequences of tobacco and consider quitting.

Study Finds Improvement for Those Receiving Medication for Opioid Use Disorder With Contingency Management Used

A systematic review and meta-analysis found that using contingency management (CM) at end-of-treatment improved outcomes on six common clinical problems during medication for OUD (MOUD): psychomotor stimulant use, polysubstance use, illicit-opioid use, cigarette smoking, therapy attendance, and medication adherence.