Designed to identify wildlife by sound, the BirdNET app opens new avenues for citizen science

The BirdNET app, a free machine-learning powered tool that can identify more than 3,000 birds by sound alone, generates reliable scientific data and makes it easier for people to contribute citizen-science data on birds by simply recording sounds. Results of tests to measure the app’s accuracy are published in the open access journal PLOS Biology.

Dynamic cells linked to brain tumor growth and recurrence

Tumors are made up of many types of cells, both cancerous and benign. The specific complexity of the cells inside brain tumors has been a trademark of the disease, one that makes treatment extremely difficult. While scientists have long known about the variety of cells within a brain tumor, the ways these tumors grow has relied on the understanding that the cells are static, unmoving and relatively fixed.

Eight Columbia Engineering Professors Win NSF CAREER Awards

Eight professors from Columbia Engineering are among this year’s recipients of the National Science Foundation’s (NSF) Early Career Development (CAREER) awards, one of the most prestigious recognitions for junior researchers. Their areas of expertise will contribute to gains in personalized cancer treatment, the analysis of cellular processes, distributed control in large-scale systems, quantum information theory, understanding multiphase flows, as well as cloud computing and storage operations.

Interrupting the Treatment of Vulnerable People on Immune-Suppressing Medicines, Doubles Their Antibody Response to COVID-19 Booster Vaccination

A major clinical trial, led by experts at the University of Nottingham working in partnership with several Universities and NHS hospitals, has found that by interrupting the treatment of vulnerable people on long-term immune supressing medicines for two weeks after a COVID-19 booster vaccination, their antibody response to the jab is doubled.

Maryland Smith’s Blockchain Business Imperative Open for New Cohort

Launched in January 2022, the six-week synchronous online certificate program starts again July 11, 2022. It focuses on blockchain and its potential economic impact across industries. It’s also designed to help leaders identify how blockchain can enable them to innovate and drive growth in their businesses.

Common Antiretroviral Drug Improves Cognition in Mouse Model of Down Syndrome

Lamivudine, a commonly-used antiretroviral drug for treating HIV, improves cognition in a mouse model of Down syndrome, according to the findings of a joint new study by researchers at the Centre for Genomic Regulation (CRG) and the IrsiCaixa AIDS Research Institute, a centre jointly promoted by the “la Caixa” Foundation and the Department of Health of the Generalitat de Catalunya. The research is published today in the Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

Un experto nos comparte sugerencias para evitar lesiones en los deportes que se juegan con «palos» o raquetas

Aquel dolor de la muñeca en el lado opuesto al pulgar y conocido como dolor cubital de la muñeca es la causa frecuente de un dolor debilitante en los deportistas que usan «palos» o raquetas para practicar deportes como tenis, golf, hockey y lacrosse.

CoVPN Trial: Novavax’s Traditional COVID-19 Vaccine Correlates to Strong Antibody Response, Protection Against SARS-CoV-2

A new analysis of the Novavax PREVENT-19 clinical trial concluded that this recombinant protein vaccine produced an antibody response comparable to mRNA vaccines and, if authorized, could help bolster global vaccine supplies. This is the first study to directly support antibody correlates of protection for a recombinant protein COVID-19 vaccine.

The Mark Foundation for Cancer Research Expands Partnership with The Johns Hopkins University to Accelerate Groundbreaking Immunotherapy Research

The Mark Foundation for Cancer Research and the Bloomberg~Kimmel Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy (BKI) announced today a new $10 million commitment at The Johns Hopkins University to fund novel work and advance immunotherapy research to provide lifesaving breakthroughs to people with cancer.

Update Noise Regulations to Protect Seals, Porpoises

In The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, scientists in Denmark review recent experiments and find noise regulations may need to be changed to protect porpoises, seals, and other sea-dwelling mammals. Current guidance for seals and porpoises is based on few measurements in a limited frequency range; the guidance is still valid for these frequencies, but investigators found substantial deviations in recent studies of the impact of low frequency noise on seals and high frequency noise on porpoises.

Electrospinning Promises Major Improvements in Wearable Technology

In APL Bioengineering, researchers from Tufts University examine some of the latest advances in wearable electronic devices and systems being developed using electrospinning – the fabrication of nanofibers with tunable properties from a polymer base – and showcase the many advantages electrospun materials have over conventional bulk materials. Their high surface-to-volume ratio endows them with enhanced porosity and breathability, which is important for long-term wearability, and with the appropriate blend of polymers, they can achieve superior biocompatibility.

Immune Molecules From a Llama Could Provide Protection Against a Vast Array of SARS-like Viruses Including COVID-19, Researchers Say

Mount Sinai-led researchers have shown that tiny, robust immune particles derived from the blood of a llama could provide strong protection against every COVID-19 variant, including Omicron, and 18 similar viruses.

Microfluidic-Based Soft Robotic Prosthetics Promise Relief for Diabetic Amputees

In Biomicrofluidics, scientists reveal their development of a new type of prosthetic using microfluidics-enabled soft robotics that promises to greatly reduce skin ulcerations and pain in patients who have had an amputation between the ankle and knee. They started with a recent device that uses pneumatic actuators and miniaturized the actuators by designing a microfluidic chip with 10 integrated pneumatic valves to control each actuator. The control box is small and light enough to be worn as part of the prosthesis.

Defining Plasma Dose for Potential Future Cancer Treatments

Chinese researchers may have found a new approach to treat cancer by using a plasma treatment to induce apoptosis, without any obvious side effect to normal cells. A plasma-activated medium (PAM) can be treated as a drug, with a dose-effect relationship. In Physics of Plasmas, the scientists’ definition of a plasma dose, the equivalent total oxidation potential (ETOP), can be used for PAM to reveal the plasma dose-response relationship for different cell types.

Children’s Mental Health Visits to Emergency Departments Increased During COVID-19 Pandemic

In the Chicago area, pediatric mental health Emergency Department (ED) visits increased 27 percent at the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, followed by a 4 percent increase monthly through February 2021, according to a study from Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago published in the journal Academic Pediatrics. The authors found increased ED visits for suicide, self-injury and disruptive behaviors, as well as higher admission rates for these children.

Indiana University establishes Kinsey-Kelley Center for Gender Equity in Business

A new research center at Indiana University will address issues of gender inequity, sexual misconduct and sexual harassment in the workplace, through an innovative partnership between the Kinsey Institute and the Kelley School of Business. The Kinsey-Kelley Center for Gender Equity in Business is another example of how IU strives to imagine, define and implement creative solutions for major social problems, including those highlighted by the #MeToo movement.

American Academy of Dermatology survey shows Gen Z sun protection, tanning knowledge lacking

A recent American Academy of Dermatology survey of more than 1,000 U.S. adults revealed that many Generation Z adults, ages 18-25, are not aware of the dangers of overexposure to the sun and are not protecting themselves from it. Ahead of the Fourth of July weekend, the AAD is setting the record straight about common misconceptions about tanning and encouraging everyone to practice safe sun to decrease their risk for skin cancer and premature aging skin.

COVID-19 shelter-in-place orders served to decrease adolescent drinking

During the COVID-19 pandemic, policy interventions designed to reduce the virus’ spread included shelter-in-place (SIP) orders and phased “reopenings” of public spaces. Knowing that adult alcohol and substance use generally rose during the pandemic due to factors such as stress, boredom, worsening mental health, and increased alcohol availability, a new study sought to understand the impact of SIPs and reopenings on adolescent alcohol use in California. Analysis shows SIP decreased frequency of alcohol use. Also, compliance with SIP orders was associated with decreased frequency and quantity of use.

Mistaken views of peer drinking can increase risk of dating violence among LGBTQIA2S+ teens

Research shows that adolescents and young adults frequently overestimate the extent to which their peers drink alcohol, and that these overestimations increase risk for problem drinking behaviors, as well as dating violence. A recent study found that LGBTQIA2S+* teens likewise overestimate the frequency and quantity of alcohol use of other LGBTQIA2S+ teens, but also drink alcohol and experience dating violence at disproportionately higher rates than heterosexual, cisgender teens.

Text messaging can help reduce hazardous drinking among older adults

Older adults – those more than 50 years of age – who consume alcohol beyond healthy drinking guidelines are a growing public health concern. A new study has found that using text messaging can help reduce drinking among this population. These findings will be shared at the 45th annual scientific meeting of the Research Society on Alcoholism (RSA) in Orlando, Florida.

Seat Assignments Drive Friendships Among Elementary School Children

Most teachers focus on academic considerations when assigning seats. A new study is the first to show that these classroom seat assignments also have important implications for children’s friendships and the enormous influence that teachers wield over the interpersonal lives of children.

Thin-film Photovoltaic Technology Combines Efficiency and Versatility

Stacking solar cells increases their efficiency. Working with partners in the EU-funded PERCISTAND project, researchers at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) have produced perovskite/CIS tandem solar cells with an efficiency of nearly 25 percent – the highest value achieved thus far with this technology. Moreover, this combination of materials is light and versatile, making it possible to envision the use of these tandem solar cells in vehicles, portable equipment, and devices that can be folded or rolled up. The researchers present their results in the journal ACS Energy Letters (DOI: 10.1021/acsenergylett.2c00707)