Race Across the U.S. with this New Healthy Monday Program

We all know maintaining healthy habits can be challenging, whether you are starting a new routine, or finding exciting and novel ways to keep up your momentum. One way to make health-related goals more manageable, sustainable, and fun is to commit or recommit to your health on Mondays. By checking in with yourself every week, you can more easily stay on track and achieve your goals.

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Lung Damage Not the Culprit for Post-COVID Exercise Limitations

A new study suggests the lungs may not be the main factor that reduce exercise ability in people recovering from severe COVID-19. Anemia and muscle dysfunction also play a role. The study is published ahead of print in the Journal of Applied Physiology. It was chosen as an APSselect article for May.

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RECOGNIZING OUTSTANDING SERVICE IN NURSING AT MSK: Second Annual Robbins Family Awards

During a virtual awards ceremony today, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSK) and the Robbins Family Foundation recognized eight distinguished MSK staff members and one team for their exemplary service. Each member was honored with the 2021 Robbins Family Award for Nursing Excellence. The virtual awards ceremony took place today, Monday, May 12, at 8:30 AM ET, to commemorate National Nurses Week (May 6–12).

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Understanding SARS-COV-2 proteins is key to improve therapeutic options for COVID-19

COVID-19 has had a significant impact since the pandemic was declared by WHO in 2020, with over 3 million deaths and counting, Researchers and medical teams have been hard at work at developing strategies to control the spread of the infection, caused by SARS-COV-2 virus and treat affected patients.

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Discovery of new geologic process calls for changes to plate tectonic cycle

Geoscientists at the University of Toronto (U of T) and Istanbul Technical University have discovered a new process in plate tectonics which shows that tremendous damage occurs to areas of Earth’s crust long before it should be geologically altered by known plate-boundary processes, highlighting the need to amend current understandings of the planet’s tectonic cycle.

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Argonne’s Wang and Streets named highly influential climate scientists

Michael Wang and David Streets, both of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Argonne National Laboratory, were named to Reuters’ “Hot List” of today’s 1,000 most influential climate scientists. Both are in Argonne’s Energy and Global Security-Energy Systems (EGS-ES) division.

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Medical Journal Publishes New Case Reports from Mehandru Center for Innovation in Nephrology at Jersey Shore University Medical Center Describing Newly Identified, Potentially Life-threatening High Potassium Disorder

Researchers at The Mehandru Center for Innovation in Nephrology at Hackensack Meridian Jersey Shore University Medical Center and other authors recently had their new case report article “Metabolic Acidosis, Hyperkalemia, and Renal Unresponsiveness to Aldosterone Syndrome: Response to Treatment with Low-Potassium Diet,” published.

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Orangutan Finding Highlights Need to Protect Habitat

Wild orangutans are known for their ability to survive food shortages, but scientists have made a surprising finding that highlights the need to protect the habitat of these critically endangered primates, which face rapid habitat destruction and threats linked to climate change. Scientists found that the muscle mass of orangutans on the island of Borneo in Southeast Asia was significantly lower when less fruit was available. That’s remarkable because orangutans are thought to be especially good at storing and using fat for energy, according a Rutgers-led study in the journal Scientific Reports.

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Argonne leads creation of definitive valuation guide for pumped storage hydropower

Argonne scientists led four other laboratories in developing definitive guidance on how to value pumped storage hydropower projects. Their efforts resulted in DOE publication of the Pumped Storage Hydropower Valuation Guidebook: A Cost-Benefit and Decision Analysis Valuation Framework. The guide provides an objective, transparent valuation methodology and helps measure both monetary and non-monetary value streams.

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Iconic bird makes its home on campus

With its tree-laden campus and adjacent protected natural reserves, UCI enjoys being home to a great variety of bird species. One particular raptor continues to capture the attention of the many avid birders in Orange County: the white-tailed kite. This iconic bird of Orange County – named for its ability to hover in the air while hunting –nearly went extinct throughout California in the early 1900s due to human-related threats.

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UNH Research Estimates 1.4 Million Children Have Yearly Violence-Related Medical Visits

A national report from the University of New Hampshire shows close to one and a half million children each year visit a doctor, emergency room or medical facility as a result of an assault, abuse, crime or other form of violence. This is four times higher than previous estimates based only on data from U.S. emergency rooms for violence-related treatment.

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From Curb to Doorstep: Driving Efficiencies for Delivering Goods

In a collaboration between Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the University of Washington’s Urban Freight Lab, a prototype webapp has been developed that combines smart sensors and machine learning to predict parking space availability. The prototype is ready for initial testing to help commercial delivery drivers find open spaces without expending fuel and losing time and patience.

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Morristown Medical Center Among 1st to Receive American College of Cardiology Transcatheter Valve Certification

Atlantic Health System’s Morristown Medical Center has received American College of Cardiology (ACC) Transcatheter Valve Certification, a designation of excellence that recognizes demonstrated expertise and commitment in treating patients undergoing transcatheter valve repair and replacement procedures, including transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR).

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Backyard chickens, rabbits, soybeans can meet household protein demand

In 2020, stores sold out of garden seed, coops and rabbit cages. Meat shortages led many to wonder what to eat for protein when supply chains are disrupted and some people turned to gathering eggs, raising animals and growing their own food. A team from Michigan Tech and the University of Alaska assessed backyard protein sources: They looked at how a typical household with a typical backyard can raise chickens, rabbits or soybeans to meet its protein needs.

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UCLA Health Receives $750K Department of Commerce Grant to Fund COVID-19 Innovation That Prioritizes Health Equity

UCLA Health has received a $750,000 grant from the U.S. Economic Development Administration to scale healthcare innovations for COVID-19 response and recovery and to support health equity through BioFutures, a new LA County workforce development program for diversity in the biosciences.

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Weizmann Institute Scientists Reveal the Triple Threat of Coronavirus

Scientists at the Weizmann Institute and the Israel Institute for Biological, Chemical and Environmental Sciences took a novel tack to investigating SARS-CoV-2’s powerful ability to infect, finding that the virus deploys an apparently unique three-pronged strategy to take over the cell’s protein-synthesis abilities. The work could help develop effective Covid-19 treatments.

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Earthquake early warnings launch in Washington, completing West Coast-wide ShakeAlert system

The U.S. Geological Survey, the University of Washington-based Pacific Northwest Seismic Network, and state emergency managers on Tuesday, May 4, will activate the system that sends earthquake early warnings throughout Washington state. This completes the rollout of ShakeAlert, an automated system that gives people living in Washington, Oregon and California advance warning of incoming earthquakes.

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Weizmann Institute Optogeneticists Use Mosquito Rhodopsins to Boost Brain Research

The Weizmann Institute’s Prof. Ofer Yizhar and colleagues used mosquito rhodopsins to create an optogenetics tool that is more precise, selective, and controllable than current techniques. In addition to increasing our understanding of the brain and advancing the field of optogenetics, the technology could lead to improved therapies for neurological and psychiatric conditions.

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