Alabama student satellite group shifts gears to ABEX mission to keep up with NASA

The Alabama Space Grant Consortium’s statewide, university student-built cube satellite project is shifting gears to ABEX, the Alabama Burst Energetics eXplorer, after its drive to be the first student-built Cubesat to leave low Earth orbit (LEO) was derailed when NASA dropped secondary payloads from the Artemis II flight.

NUS researchers develop world’s first smart bandage that detects multiple biomarkers for onsite chronic wound monitoring

A research team led by the National University of Singapore has developed a smart wearable sensor that can conduct real-time, point-of-care assessment of chronic wounds wirelessly via an app. A world’s first, the novel sensor technology can detect temperature, pH, bacteria type and inflammatory factors specific to chronic wounds within 15 minutes, hence enabling fast and accurate wound assessment.

Berkeley Lab Mobilizes to Predict How Caldor Fire May Lead to Floods and Land Movement

After the Caldor Fire erupted in August 2021, scientists from Berkeley Lab launched a research project to study how the fire would affect the mountain ecosystem, including factors such as streamflow, groundwater levels, water quality, and possible soil erosion leading to floods and debris flow. They mobilized to burn areas to collect samples of water, sediment, and ash.

LLNL joins Human Vaccines Project to accelerate vaccine development and understanding of immune response

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has joined the international Human Vaccines Project, bringing Lab expertise and computing resources to the consortium to aid development of a universal coronavirus vaccine and improve understanding of immune response.

Community Health Center Honored for Services Assisting Minority Women

Florida Atlantic University and Northwest Community Health Alliance’s Community Health Center, operated by FAU’s Christine E. Lynn College of Nursing, together with the West Palm Beach YWCA, recently received the “2021 Community Collaborators Award” from Nonprofits First, Inc., for their untiring efforts to mitigate health care disparities among women from minority groups with limited access to quality care.

FAU Among Three Finalists for National Degree Completion Award

The Association of Public and Land-grant Universities (APLU) selected Florida Atlantic University to be one of three finalists for its national Degree Completion Award. A winner will be selected during the APLU’s annual meeting that takes place Nov. 15-17.

Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Selects Medical Schools as Partners for Key Anti-Racism Initiative

The Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai will enroll 11 partner medical schools in its Anti-Racist Transformation (ART) in Medical Education initiative, which seeks to use a formal change management process developed at Mount Sinai to address deeply entrenched racism and bias. The initiative has received generous support from the Josiah Macy Jr. Foundation.

In pregnant women with COVID-19, sex of fetus may influence maternal and placental immune response and neonatal immune protection

In pregnant women who tested positive for SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, male placentas demonstrated significantly higher levels of certain genes and proteins associated with increased immune activation compared with female placentas, according to a new study published in Science Translational Medicine.

Europeans want climate action but show little appetite for radical lifestyle change -– new polling

Europeans want urgent action on climate change but remain committed meat-eaters and question policy proposals such as banning the sale of new petrol vehicles after 2030, according to a new poll from the YouGov-Cambridge Centre for Public Opinion Research that surveyed environmental attitudes in seven European countries, including the UK.

ELRIG Drug Discovery 2021 Hosts Six SLAS Innovation AveNEW Companies

The Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening (SLAS) will host its popular Innovation AveNEW for startups at Drug Discovery 2021 in Liverpool, UK on October 19-20. Presented by The European Laboratory Research & Innovation Group (ELRIG), Drug Discovery 2021 returns to an in-person meeting format with a mission to engage quality discussions on key issues and future directions in preclinical drug discovery.

Specialty services offered for those with inherited retinal diseases 

A new service for people with rare eye conditions has opened at the University of Illinois Chicago College of Medicine’s Illinois Eye and Ear Infirmary. The Inherited Retinal Disease Service offers state-of-the-art evaluation and consultation for patients with inherited retinal diseases, such as retinitis pigmentosa, Best disease, cone dystrophy, macular dystrophy, Stargardt disease and others.

Does A Lifetime of Vigorous Exercise Increase the Risk of Developing ALS?

There is debate over whether vigorous physical activity is a risk factor for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). A new study suggests it depends on whether that vigorous activity you get over your lifetime happens on the job or during leisure time. The research is published in the October 20, 2021, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

UCI researcher gets NSF-backed grant to study wildfires’ effects on farmworkers

Michael Méndez of the University of California, Irvine has received a two-year, $400,000 grant from the National Center for Atmospheric Research’s Early Career Faculty Innovator Program. It will fund a joint project with researchers at NCAR – which is sponsored by the National Science Foundation – exploring the disparate treatment of undocumented Latino/Latina and Indigenous migrant farmworkers during extreme wildfire events in Sonoma County.

Low-dose Aspirin No Longer Recommended to Prevent Cardiovascular Disease

New draft recommendations from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommend against taking aspirin to prevent heart attacks and strokes for most people. The Oct. 12, 2021 guidelines are based on new evidence showing that the risks of daily low-dose…

Discovery of a potential new therapy for inflammatory arthritis

Ankylosing spondylitis is a painful and inflammatory form of axial spondyloarthritis (SpA) which affects 1-2% of Canadians and causes inflammation in the spine, joints, eyes, gut and skin. In a new paper recently published in the journal Science Translational Medicine, researchers at the Schroeder Arthritis Institute at UHN have made a discovery that could lead to new treatments for SpA.

Mount Sinai Launches the Brain and Body Research Center, Among the First in the U.S.to Focus Solely on How the Brain and Body Interact

Have you ever experienced a stressful time in your life and then caught a cold, or wondered why you feel sad and depressed when you’re sick? It turns out that it’s not all in your head.

Recent research spanning the fields of neuroscience and immunology suggests that when the brain senses a threat in the environment—whether it be physical, psychological, or social—it sends signals via a complex network of peripheral nerves that mobilize the immune system, readying it to protect us from injury.

TraumaChekTM: Next step in life-saving blood-assessment technology

Scientists at Case Western Reserve University are leading the development of TraumaChekTM, a hand-held medical device to quickly assess a wounded soldier’s critical clotting issues and other blood conditions in the battlefield. The new sensor, if successful and adopted in the field, would represent the next generation of their successful ClotChip®, which emergency workers can use to measure how well a patient’s blood may clot.

TraumaChekTM: Next step in life-saving blood-assessment technology

Scientists at Case Western Reserve University are leading the development of TraumaChekTM, a hand-held medical device to quickly assess a wounded soldier’s critical clotting issues and other blood conditions in the battlefield. The new sensor, if successful and adopted in the field, would represent the next generation of their successful ClotChip®, which emergency workers can use to measure how well a patient’s blood may clot.

Penn Medicine Study Finds Red Blood Cells Play Much Larger Role in Immune System Through Discovery of DNA-Binding Capability

New research has revealed that red blood cells function as critical immune sensors by binding cell-free DNA, called nucleic acid, present in the body’s circulation during sepsis and COVID-19, and that this DNA-binding capability triggers their removal from circulation, driving inflammation and anemia during severe illness and playing a much larger role in the immune system than previously thought. Scientists have long known that red blood cells, which are essential in delivering oxygen throughout the body, also interacted with the immune system, but didn’t know whether they directly altered inflammation, until now. The study, led by researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, was published today in Science Translational Medicine.

Penn Medicine Study Finds Red Blood Cells Play Much Larger Role in Immune System Through Discovery of DNA-Binding Capability

New research has revealed that red blood cells function as critical immune sensors by binding cell-free DNA, called nucleic acid, present in the body’s circulation during sepsis and COVID-19, and that this DNA-binding capability triggers their removal from circulation, driving inflammation and anemia during severe illness and playing a much larger role in the immune system than previously thought. Scientists have long known that red blood cells, which are essential in delivering oxygen throughout the body, also interacted with the immune system, but didn’t know whether they directly altered inflammation, until now. The study, led by researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, was published today in Science Translational Medicine.

TEERIN LIEWLUCK, MD AWARDED THE SCIENTIFIC IMPACT AWARD FROM AANEM

Teerin Liewluck, MD, has been chosen as one of the winners of AANEM’s 2021 Scientific Impact Award. Dr. Liewluck was the senior author on a published paper titled, Neuromuscular Transmission Defects in Myopathies: Rare but Worth Searching For.