Unconscious food cravings may make bariatric surgery less effective for people with extreme obesity

Patients with extreme obesity are prone to unconscious food impulses and cravings that may make it challenging for them to maintain weight loss after bariatric surgery, according to research that was accepted for presentation at ENDO 2020, the Endocrine Society’s annual meeting, and will be published in a special supplemental section of the Journal of the Endocrine Society.

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Most internists-in-training feel ill-equipped to treat obesity

Most resident physicians training in internal medicine do not feel adequately prepared to manage obesity in their patients, a new survey from a California residency program finds. The results were accepted for presentation at ENDO 2020, the Endocrine Society’s annual meeting, and will be published in a special supplemental section of the Journal of the Endocrine Society.

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Bariatric surgery before diabetes develops leads to greater weight loss

Obese patients may lose more weight if they undergo bariatric surgery before they develop diabetes, suggests a study accepted for presentation at ENDO 2020, the Endocrine Society’s annual meeting. The research will be published in a special supplemental issue of the Journal of the Endocrine Society.

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New Closed-Loop System Offers Promise as Novel Treatment for Post-Bariatric Hypoglycemia

Post-bariatric hypoglycemia is a profoundly life-altering condition for patients. Having unpredictable hypoglycemia that people can’t detect is really an unsafe situation. Researchers at Joslin Diabetes Center and Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences have developed a closed-loop system that automatically provides patients with an appropriate, as-needed dose of liquid glucagon to treat this condition.

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Cleveland Clinic Develops Calculator To Estimate 10-Year Risk Of Diabetes Complications

Patients struggling with type 2 diabetes and obesity are faced with the decision of whether to receive usual medical care or undergo weight-loss surgery. Now, a new risk calculator developed by Cleveland Clinic researchers can show these patients their risks of developing major health complications over the next 10 years depending on which course of treatment they choose.

The research was presented today as one of the Top 10 studies at the ObesityWeek 2019 international conference in Las Vegas.

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