Common Weight-Loss Drug Successfully Targets Fat That Can Endanger Heart Health

DALLAS – August 4, 2021 – Researchers at UT Southwestern announced successful results of a clinical trial for a commonly prescribed weight-loss drug called liraglutide. In adults who are overweight or have obesity combined with high cardiovascular risk, once-daily liraglutide combined with lifestyle interventions significantly lowered two types of fat that have been associated with risk to heart health: visceral fat and ectopic fat.

Fat Tissue Protein Signaling May Lead to Treatment to Improve Heart Health in People Who Can’t Exercise

Article title: Aerobic exercise training reduces cardiac function and coronary flow-induced vasodilation in mice lacking adiponectin Authors: Jacob T. Caldwell, Karissa M. Dieseldorff Jones, Hyerim Park, Jose R. Pinto, Payal Ghosh, Emily C. Reid-Foley, Brody Ulrich, Michael D. Delp, Brad…

Most Americans Are Not Getting Enough Fiber in Our Diets

Only 5% of men and 9% of women are getting the recommended daily amount of dietary fiber, according to a study being presented at NUTRITION 2021 LIVE ONLINE. Insufficient fiber intake is associated with a higher risk of heart disease and diabetes, two of the most common diseases in the U.S.

Study Compares Heart Benefits of Low-Fat and Plant-Centered Diets

There has been a long-standing debate as to whether a low-fat or a plant-centered diet is better at lowering the risk of cardiovascular disease. A new study that followed more than 4,700 people over 30 years, found that a plant-centered diet was associated with a lower long-term risk for cardiovascular disease. However, both diets were linked with lower LDL, or bad cholesterol, levels.

Heart Health Problems in Your 20s May Affect Brain Health Decades Later

Having health issues such as smoking, high cholesterol or a high body mass index (BMI) in your 20s may make you more likely to have problems with thinking and memory skills and even the brain’s ability to properly regulate its blood flow, according to a preliminary study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology’s 72nd Annual Meeting in Toronto, Canada, April 25 to May 1, 2020.

Living near Trees May Prevent Vascular Damage from Pollution

Living near an abundance of green vegetation can offset the negative effects of air pollution on blood vessel health. The first-of-its-kind study is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology-Heart and Circulatory Physiology.

OMRON Healthcare and Mount Sinai Health System Collaborate to Help High-Risk Patients Monitor Their Blood Pressure from Home with VitalSight

• Ensures close connection between patient and physician for remote hypertension monitoring
• Complements Mount Sinai’s growing telehealth initiative
• Medicare-covered and generally at no cost to patients, depending on coverage

Stress during Pregnancy May Negatively Affect Baby’s Muscles

Research in sheep suggests that high levels of a stress hormone during pregnancy may alter gene expression in multiple muscle groups of offspring. These shifts may affect heart, breathing and skeletal muscle function, and could potentially increase risks of inflammation and infection. The study is published ahead of print in Physiological Genomics.

Valentine’s Day heartbreak turns to healing

A broken heart for Valentine’s Day sounds like the plot of a romantic comedy. But for Rebekah Holl, a literal broken heart was her reality on Feb. 14, 2019. Born with a rare defect called d-Transposition of the Great Arteries, she underwent open-heart surgery as an infant to correct the way blood circulates throughout her body. Though rare, congenital heart defects are the most common form of birth defects – affecting about 1% or 40,000 births per year in the U.S.

GW Experts Available to Comment for Stories During American Heart Month

WASHINGTON (Jan. 29, 2020) — Heart disease is one of the leading causes of death in the U.S., according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. February is American Heart Month, which was created to remind Americans to…

Genetic Breakthrough Identifies Heart Failure Risk in African and Latino Americans

Findings may inform genetic screening test for patients at risk and medically under-served

Intermittent Fasting Increases Longevity in Cardiac Catheterization Patients

In a new study by researchers at the Intermountain Healthcare Heart Institute in Salt Lake City, researchers have found that cardiac catheterization patients who practiced regular intermittent fasting lived longer than patients who don’t.

Teaching Preschool Caregivers about Healthy Behaviors May Promote Healthier Lifestyle in Some High-Risk Groups

Study Shows Vascular Ultrasounds and Adhering to Interventional Education in Underserved Communities can Improve Health among Parents and School Staff

Bolivian Forager-Farmers Known for Amazing Heart Health Are Splitting in Beliefs About What Makes a Good Life

A small Bolivian society of indigenous forager-farmers, known for astonishingly healthy cardiovascular systems, is seeing a split in beliefs about what makes a good life. Some are holding more to the traditional — more family ties, hunting and knowledge of forest medicine — but others are starting to favor material wealth, a Baylor University study finds.