Gender Affirmation Treatment Delivery Route May Affect Heart Health

Transgender and gender diverse (TGD) people assigned male at birth are at increased heart health risk. The delivery route of estrogen medication is known to affect heart health risk in cisgender women. However, research is lacking on how estrogen route affects heart health in the TGD population.

Biological Sex, Heart Disease Risk Factors Can Influence Relationship between Cardiorespiratory Fitness Level and Brain Blood Flow

Article title: Influence of sex and presence of cardiovascular risk factors on relations between cardiorespiratory fitness and cerebrovascular hemodynamics Authors: Wesley K. Lefferts, Cynthia M. Weiner, Sara E. Mascone, Jacqueline A. Augustine, Kevin S. Heffernan, Elizabeth C. Lefferts From the…

Heart of Aging Female Mice Produce More Collagen than Males, Develops More Scarring

Article title: Sex-specific phenotypes in the aging mouse heart and consequences for chronic fibrosis Authors: Aude Angelini, Jesus Ortiz-Urbina, JoAnn Trial, Anilkumar K. Reddy, Anna Malovannaya, Antrix Jain, Mark L. Entman, George E. Taffet, Katarzyna A. Cieslik From the authors:…

Exercise + Sauna = Better Cardiovascular Function

New research suggests that adding a regular 15-minute sauna to an exercise routine may improve cardiovascular risk factors more than exercise alone. The study is the first randomized controlled trial to explore the long-term combination of exercise and sauna bathing in a non-clinical population. It is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology-Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology.

Researchers Suggest Continued Heart and Lung Monitoring after COVID-19 for People with Highly Physical Jobs

Article title: The effect of medium-term recovery status after COVID-19 illness on cardiopulmonary exercise capacity in a physically active adult population Authors: Peter Ladlow, Oliver O’Sullivan, Alexander N. Bennett, Robert Barker-Davies, Andrew Houston, Rebecca Chamley, Samantha May, Daniel Mills, Dominic…

Selective Autophagy Process Protects Heart Muscle Cells from Death

Article title: Chaperone-mediated autophagy protects cardiomyocytes against hypoxic cell death Authors: Rajeshwary Ghosh, Jennifer Jason Gillaspie, Kenneth S. Campbell, J. David Symons, Sihem Boudina, James Scott Pattison From the authors: “In summary, the present study demonstrated the importance of [chaperone-mediated…

Under 30 Percent of U.S. Kids Have High Scores for Heart Health

Most children and adolescents living in the U.S. have suboptimal scores for cardiovascular health (CVH), according to the first study to use the American Heart Association’s new “Life’s Essential 8” metrics and scoring algorithm for quantifying CVH levels in adults and children. Overall, under 30 percent of 2-19-year-olds had high CVH. The proportion of children with high CVH declined markedly with older age: 56 percent of 2-5-year-old children had high CVH, compared with 33 percent of 6-11-year-olds and 14 percent of 12-19-year-olds.

Analysis finds little evidence of heart problems in men undergoing testosterone treatment

Previous clinical trials have provided insufficient evidence to decide whether testosterone causes heart problems in men during the first year of treatment, according to research being presented Monday at ENDO 2022, the Endocrine Society’s annual meeting in Atlanta, Ga., and published in The Lancet Healthy Longevity.

Breakthrough Omicron COVID-19 Variant Cases Don’t Impair Vascular Health Post-infection in Young Otherwise Healthy Adults

New research finds vaccinated young adults who were diagnosed with COVID-19 during the “omicron wave” of late 2021 and early 2022 did not have lasting vascular impairment after active infection. The first-of-its-kind study is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology-Heart and Circulatory Physiology.

Reversal of Heart Enlargement Differs in the Sexes; Doesn’t Use Universal Signaling Pathways

Article title: Regression from pathological hypertrophy in mice is sexually dimorphic and stimulus-specific Authors: Deanna L. Muehleman, Claudia Crocini, Alison R. Swearingen, Christopher D. Ozeroff, Leslie A. Leinwand From the authors: “This work highlights that the reversal of pathological hypertrophy…

Researchers ID Post-exercise Changes in MicroRNA as Potential Markers for Coronary Artery Disease

Article title: Associations between circulating microRNAs and coronary plaque characteristics: potential impact from physical exercise Authors: Maria Dalen Taraldsen, Rune Wiseth, Vibeke Videm, Anja Bye, Erik Madssen From the authors: “This exploratory study demonstrated six miRs associated with coronary necrotic…

High Caffeine Consumption Disrupts Heart Rhythms in Middle-aged Rats

New research finds that excess caffeine is more likely to cause irregular heart rhythms in middle aged rats than in young adult rats. The study will be presented this week at the American Physiological Society annual meeting at Experimental Biology 2022 in Philadelphia.

American Heart Association Honors Two Penn Medicine Scientists for Achievements in Research

Two Penn Medicine faculty members, Kiran Musunuru, MD, PhD, and Daniel Rader, MD, are being honored with prestigious awards from the American Heart Association (AHA) for their achievements in cardiovascular research. Both awards will be presented during the Presidential Session on Sunday, Nov. 14, at the association’s Scientific Sessions 2021.

Common Weight-Loss Drug Successfully Targets Fat That Can Endanger Heart Health

DALLAS – August 4, 2021 – Researchers at UT Southwestern announced successful results of a clinical trial for a commonly prescribed weight-loss drug called liraglutide. In adults who are overweight or have obesity combined with high cardiovascular risk, once-daily liraglutide combined with lifestyle interventions significantly lowered two types of fat that have been associated with risk to heart health: visceral fat and ectopic fat.

Fat Tissue Protein Signaling May Lead to Treatment to Improve Heart Health in People Who Can’t Exercise

Article title: Aerobic exercise training reduces cardiac function and coronary flow-induced vasodilation in mice lacking adiponectin Authors: Jacob T. Caldwell, Karissa M. Dieseldorff Jones, Hyerim Park, Jose R. Pinto, Payal Ghosh, Emily C. Reid-Foley, Brody Ulrich, Michael D. Delp, Brad…

Most Americans Are Not Getting Enough Fiber in Our Diets

Only 5% of men and 9% of women are getting the recommended daily amount of dietary fiber, according to a study being presented at NUTRITION 2021 LIVE ONLINE. Insufficient fiber intake is associated with a higher risk of heart disease and diabetes, two of the most common diseases in the U.S.

Study Compares Heart Benefits of Low-Fat and Plant-Centered Diets

There has been a long-standing debate as to whether a low-fat or a plant-centered diet is better at lowering the risk of cardiovascular disease. A new study that followed more than 4,700 people over 30 years, found that a plant-centered diet was associated with a lower long-term risk for cardiovascular disease. However, both diets were linked with lower LDL, or bad cholesterol, levels.

Heart Health Problems in Your 20s May Affect Brain Health Decades Later

Having health issues such as smoking, high cholesterol or a high body mass index (BMI) in your 20s may make you more likely to have problems with thinking and memory skills and even the brain’s ability to properly regulate its blood flow, according to a preliminary study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology’s 72nd Annual Meeting in Toronto, Canada, April 25 to May 1, 2020.

Living near Trees May Prevent Vascular Damage from Pollution

Living near an abundance of green vegetation can offset the negative effects of air pollution on blood vessel health. The first-of-its-kind study is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology-Heart and Circulatory Physiology.

OMRON Healthcare and Mount Sinai Health System Collaborate to Help High-Risk Patients Monitor Their Blood Pressure from Home with VitalSight

• Ensures close connection between patient and physician for remote hypertension monitoring
• Complements Mount Sinai’s growing telehealth initiative
• Medicare-covered and generally at no cost to patients, depending on coverage

Stress during Pregnancy May Negatively Affect Baby’s Muscles

Research in sheep suggests that high levels of a stress hormone during pregnancy may alter gene expression in multiple muscle groups of offspring. These shifts may affect heart, breathing and skeletal muscle function, and could potentially increase risks of inflammation and infection. The study is published ahead of print in Physiological Genomics.

Valentine’s Day heartbreak turns to healing

A broken heart for Valentine’s Day sounds like the plot of a romantic comedy. But for Rebekah Holl, a literal broken heart was her reality on Feb. 14, 2019. Born with a rare defect called d-Transposition of the Great Arteries, she underwent open-heart surgery as an infant to correct the way blood circulates throughout her body. Though rare, congenital heart defects are the most common form of birth defects – affecting about 1% or 40,000 births per year in the U.S.