A Patient Pioneer: Minimally Invasive Lung Transplantation

To anyone else, it’s just a walk around the block. But for Frank Coburn, 57, and his wife, it’s a miracle. A miracle that resulted from Coburn becoming the first Southern Californian—and possibly first in the U.S.—to receive a minimally invasive double lung transplant. The procedure was performed at the Smidt Heart Institute.

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Even During Pandemic, Volunteers Bring Comfort

The Ruth and Harry Roman Emergency Department at Cedars-Sinai sees more than 85,000 patients each year. Among the first to greet those patients and their loved ones–even during the coronavirus pandemic–are Cedars-Sinai’s blue-coated volunteers, who are honored this week during National Volunteer Appreciation Week.

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Irritable Bowel Syndrome: Mark Pimentel, MD

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is the most common gastrointestinal disorder, affecting 10-15% of the world’s population. Approximately two-thirds of those who suffer from IBS are women. The disease can have mild forms or cause severe debilitation as diarrhea alternates with constipation. Severe cramping and bloating also are common. Because chronic IBS is so debilitating, it often disrupts the daily lives of people with this disorder.

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Forum Tackles Vaccine Hesitancy in the Black Community

Leading healthcare and faith leaders addressed key issues that are contributing to vaccine hesitancy in Black communities during a national online discussion this week, explaining that a lack of access to healthcare, concerns over vaccine safety, and religious beliefs are keeping many from getting COVID-19 vaccines.

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Study: New Approach May Boost Prostate Cancer Immunotherapies

Researchers have discovered a new way to transform the tissues surrounding prostate tumors to help the body’s immune cells fight the cancer. The discovery, made in human and mouse cells and in laboratory mice, could lead to improvements in immunotherapy treatments for prostate cancer, the second most common cancer in men in the U.S.

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Cedars-Sinai Demo Day Goes Virtual

The COVID-19 pandemic has brought unprecedented innovation on the part of healthcare providers everywhere who rose to meet the challenges of the past year.

And the next generation of healthcare innovations will be on display during the Cedars-Sinai Accelerator Demo Day, on Wednesday, April 7, from 3:30-5 p.m. Click here to register to attend the virtual event.

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#YearofCOVID: Patients Look Back

COVID-19 swept into Southern California a year ago, a silent and forbidding foe that randomly upended the lives of patients young and old, hearty and frail, ready or not. Some survivors can recall every detail of their illnesses, while others say that memories of days spent on a ventilator or in a fog of fever are irretrievable. Loneliness was their constant, and often only, companion.

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#YearofCOVID Tip Sheet

One year has passed since stay-at-home orders went into effect across the U.S. and the COVID-19 pandemic changed our lives in profound ways. During this dark year, we’ve witnessed overwhelming loss of life and livelihood, and separation from those we love. But we have also seen courageous patients and heroic healthcare workers battling the disease, as swift breakthroughs have brought us vaccines and hope.

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National Science Foundation Honors Cedars-Sinai Neuroscientist

At 36, neuroscientist Tanuj Gulati, PhD, is still in the early phases of his career, but his contributions to the field of neurosciences have been nothing short of impactful. His research is so promising, in fact, that the National Science Foundation has awarded Gulati with the foundation’s top honor, the Faculty Early Career Development Program (CAREER) award.

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COVID-19 Risk Factors for Healthcare Workers: Race, Ethnicity

Healthcare workers might not be so different from the general population in the factors that determine their risk of getting COVID-19. A new study led by Cedars-Sinai shows that healthcare workers are more likely to have antibodies to COVID-19 in their blood if they are African American or Latino or have hypertension.

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Southern California COVID-19 Strain Rapidly Expands Global Reach

A new strain of the coronavirus in Southern California, first reported last month by Cedars-Sinai, is rapidly spreading across the country and around the world as travelers apparently carry the virus with them to a growing list of global destinations, according to new research published today in the peer-reviewed Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA). The strain now accounts for nearly half of current COVID-19 cases in Southern California.

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The Truth About the COVID-19 Vaccines

The COVID-19 vaccines have been described by many as the light at the end of the tunnel and the best tool we have to stop this pandemic. But along with the vaccine rollout, there have been a number of myths circulating about their safety and effectiveness. To set the record straight, Cedars-Sinai’s Newsroom talked with Priya Soni, MD, a pediatrician and an infectious disease specialist.

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Women At Higher-Risk of Fatal, Nightime Cardiac Arrest

New research from the Center for Cardiac Arrest Prevention in the Smidt Heart Institute at Cedars-Sinai has found for the first time that during nighttime hours, women are more likely than men to suffer sudden death due to cardiac arrest. Findings were published in the journal Heart Rhythm.

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Healthcare Innovation Eases Burden on ICU Staff

Throughout the COVID-19 crisis, Cedars-Sinai employees have stepped-up and stepped-in to support patients and colleagues alike. And while there has been no shortage of selflessness, one group of volunteers shines a bright light on both the innovation and teamwork spurring from the past 10 months of treating the sickest of patients.

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Enhanced Oral Uptake of Exosomes Opens Cell Therapy Alternative

Cell-derived exosomes are effective in treating disease when mixed with the dominant protein in breast milk and given orally, a new Smidt Heart Institute study of laboratory mice shows. The findings, published in the peer-reviewed Journal of Extracellular Vesicles, could help develop new oral medications for treating patients with muscular dystrophy and heart failure.

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