Hospitals with More Inpatient Nurse Practitioners Linked to Better Outcomes, More Satisfied Patients

According to a new study published today in Medical Care, hospitals that employ more inpatient nurse practitioners (NPs) have lower surgical mortality, higher patient satisfaction, and lower costs of care. Nurse practitioners are registered nurses (RNs) with advanced graduate education and expanded legal scope of practice to prescribe treatments including pain medications.

Schizophrenia Study Suggests Advanced Genetic Scorecard Cannot Predict a Patient’s Fate

Researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai found that a tool commonly used in research for evaluating a person’s genetic risk for a disease, called a polygenic risk score, was no better at predicting the outcome of a schizophrenia patient’s disease over time than written reports. The results raise important questions about the use of polygenic risk scores in real-world, clinical situations, and also suggest that a doctor’s written report may be an untapped source of predictive information.

New AACN CSI Academy Cohort at 10 Hospitals Focuses on Underserved Patient Populations

Thanks to a grant from Edwards Lifesciences Foundation, nurses caring for underserved critically ill cardiac patients at 10 U.S. hospitals will participate in a cardiac-focused cohort of AACN Clinical Scene Investigator (CSI) Academy, a nurse leadership and innovation program from the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

EHR Usability Issues Linked to Nurse Burnout and Patient Outcomes

A new study from the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing’s Center for Health Outcomes and Policy Research (CHOPR) has investigated associations between EHR usability and nurse job outcomes (burnout, job dissatisfaction, and intention to leave) and surgical patient outcomes (inpatient mortality and 30-day readmission).

Nurse Work Environment Influences Stroke Outcomes

Stroke remains a leading cause of death worldwide and one of the most common reasons for disability. While a wide variety of factors influence stroke outcomes, data show that avoiding readmissions and long lengths of stay among ischemic stroke patients has benefits for patients and health care systems alike. Although reduced readmission rates among various medical patients have been associated with better nurse work environments, it is unknown how the work environment might influence readmissions and length of stay for ischemic stroke patients.

New Study Helps Forecast Functional Recovery Time and Return to Activities Following Hip Fracture Surgery

For patients undergoing surgery for a hip fracture, there are still unknowns regarding the return to pre-facture level of function, specifically in regard to driving and mobility. However, a new article published in the January issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons® (JAAOS®) further quantifies these outcomes. The study authors found that patients can expect to regain full functionality within two to three years after hip fracture surgery. The study also looked at the long-term psychosocial limitations of patients compared to peer groups and concluded that socialization may aid in recovery.

Total Joint Replacement and the Impact on Future Falls in Osteoarthritis Patients

Patients who have had a total joint arthroplasty (TJA) demonstrate excellent long-term outcomes with increased mobility and improved ability to complete their activities of daily living. However, there is still an ongoing debate whether patients who have undergone TJA are at an increased risk of falls and fragility fractures. According to a new research article published in the Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons®, authors compared the fall rates of nearly 500,000 cases of osteoarthritic patients and found those who underwent TJA experienced a significantly lower number of falls post-op than those who did not have the surgery.

“Prescribing Art” course teaches med students to recognize bias and better address racial disparities

Can art help doctors better understand their patients and address racial disparities? An innovative collaboration at the University of Alabama at Birmingham uses art to help medical students hone their observational skills, in order to make more accurate diagnoses. “Prescribing Art: How Observation Enhances Medicine” is a partnership between the School of Medicine, the Abroms-Engel Institute for Visual Arts and the Birmingham Civil Rights Institute.