Study Details Toxic Elements Found in Stranded Whales, Dolphins Over 15 Years

Researchers evaluated the prevalence, concentration and tissue distribution of essential and non-essential trace elements, including heavy metal toxicants in tissue (blubber, kidney, liver, skeletal muscle, skin) and fecal samples. Findings reveal how toxicant levels relate to their sex, breed, age and other demographic factors.

Residents of Rural ‘Glades’ Take a ‘Leap of Faith’ to Combat Dementia

Compared to urban dwellers, racially/ethnically diverse older adults face up to an 80 percent greater risk of cognitive impairment in older age, and 2.5 times potentially preventable Alzheimer’s-related (ADRD) hospitalizations.

FAU Receives $750,000 Philanthropic Grant for Alzheimer’s Disease

A $750,000 philanthropic grant from the Carl Angus DeSantis Foundation will help FAU develop partnerships and programs that will establish best practice for coordinated care and research for Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias.

DNA Decodes the Dining Preferences of the Shell-Shucking Whitespotted Eagle Ray

With mighty jaws and plate-like teeth, the globally endangered whitespotted eagle ray can pretty much crunch on anything. Yet, little information is available on critical components of their life history in the U.S., such as their diet.

Previously Overlooked Algae Toxin Widespread in Southern Indian River Lagoon

Pseudo-nitzschia spp., an algae that produces the neurotoxin domoic acid, can bioaccumulate within food webs causing harm to humans and animals. A molecular study of Florida’s Indian River Lagoon shows this algae was present in 87 percent of the water samples collected. All isolates showed toxicity, and domoic acid was found in 47 percent of surface water samples. As a nursery for many organisms that supports a high amount of biodiversity, the presence of domoic acid could negatively impact the lagoon system.

Crushed Clams, Roaming Rays: Acoustic Tags Reveal Predator Interactions

Inspired by clam fishermen reports, researchers used passive acoustic telemetry to gauge the interactions between two highly mobile rays. They monitored the tagged rays in the wild over two years to see how often and when they visited clam leases. Results provide both good news and bad news for clammers. Rays spent even more time in these clam lease sites than clammers reported or suspected, but it’s not necessarily where they prefer hanging out.

Broad Climate Change Concern in Florida Linked With Recent Extreme Weather

An increasing number of Floridians agree that human actions are causing climate change, including a record number of Florida Republicans. Virtually all respondents (90 percent) believe climate change is happening, with 65 percent attributing the causes to human actions, including 49 percent of GOP voters. Belief in and concern about human-caused climate change appears to be translating into support for policies to reduce emissions and reduce impacts. The explanation for this emerging consensus may be grounded in people’s lived experiences with weather events.

FAU and Insightec Partner to Use Focused Ultrasound to Treat Neurological Disorders

This agreement will enable FAU and Insightec to collaborate to advance scientific knowledge about the use of focused ultrasound to treat brain diseases, including Parkinson’s disease and Alzheimer’s disease. By harnessing acoustic energy, Insightec’s innovative technology uses focused ultrasound to treat diseases in different ways.

FAU, Virtual Planet and City of West Palm Beach Unveil Groundbreaking Virtual Reality Experience

The multidisciplinary team created a virtual simulation of the devastation that a Category 5 hurricane and sea level rise could have on West Palm Beach. The simulation, produced with 3D technology, reveals the destruction that could occur in Osprey Park and the surrounding communities, highlighting the threat to the coastline and potential solutions for coastal areas.

FAU Gets $6 Million to Increase Mental Health Counselors in Florida Schools

A 2019 Florida Department of Health survey showed that 12.7 percent of Florida high schoolers had carried a weapon; 21.2 percent were involved in a physical altercation; and 11.3 percent and 14.9 percent were bullied electronically or on school property, respectively. In addition, 15.6 percent reported they had seriously considered attempting suicide. Alarmingly, results indicated a 50 percent increase in the suicide attempt rate for black females. These numbers demonstrate the need for timely, immediate prevention and intervention in mental health services for Florida youth.

FAU Developed AUTOHOLO Shows Potential as Red Tide Warning System

Current methods to monitor red tide are limited. Using AUTOHOLO, a new autonomous, submersible, 3D holographic microscope and imaging system, a study is the first to characterize red tide in the field and breaks new ground for monitoring harmful algal blooms.

FAU New Home to Award-winning Website ‘The Invading Sea’

The Invading Sea, an award-winning website featuring content on climate change in Florida, now has a new home at FAU. The Invading Sea was founded in 2018 as a collaboration among the editorial boards of the Miami Herald, Palm Beach Post and Sun Sentinel, with Miami-based public radio station WLRN serving as a news partner. The site will continue to be a nonpartisan source for news and opinion pieces about climate change and other environmental issues in Florida at FAU, while expanding its focus to include more educational content.

University provost calls out anti-woke/trans movement in Florida

Donald Hall, provost at Binghamton University, State University of New York, just published a powerful op-ed at the Miami Herald that calls out anti-woke/anti-trans policy and hysteria gaining ground in Florida, and calls for those students seeking a positive learning environment…

FAU Harbor Branch Lands U.S. EPA Grant for ‘Hands-on’ Indian River Lagoon Field Trip

The project will host 125 field trips, which will educate as many as 3,125 socially disadvantaged middle and high school students about Florida’s natural resources and the importance of conserving them.

FAU Teams Up with Shipwreck Park for Underwater Public Project, ‘Wahoo Bay’

Several years in the making, Wahoo Bay will serve partly as an educational marine park as well as an initiative to restore the natural habitat. Using AI and sensors, FAU engineers and students will deploy automated weather monitoring stations, underwater cameras, vehicles, acoustic and water quality monitoring sensors in Wahoo Bay, a “living” laboratory that provides an immersive experience for visitors while raising awareness of keeping oceans and coral reef systems healthy.

Study First to Show Statewide Cannabis-related Deaths in Florida

There has been a 1,107.01 percent increase in the number of people with medical cannabis cards in Florida (2018 to Jan. 27). One key reason is because many people believe cannabinoids – plant derived, medicinal, and synthetic or chemically engineered – are safe to use. A study shows that 386 people died in Florida as a result of cannabis use; of these, 258 cases were caused by synthetic cannabis. Nearly 88 percent were men; 28 percent of deaths were in those ages 45 to 54, compared to 9 percent in those ages 8 to 24. Nearly 99 percent of individuals using cannabis and synthetic cannabis died from accidents.

FAU, Broward Health to Partner on Academic Medicine

FAU and Broward Health on Monday announced a partnership agreement that will provide academic medicine to Broward County, and opportunities to collaborate in the areas of education, clinical training and practice, health services administration and research.

FSU historian available to discuss 100-year anniversary of Rosewood massacre

By: Bill Wellock | Published: December 15, 2022 | 2:40 pm | SHARE: A century ago, a mob destroyed the town of Rosewood in Levy County, Florida — racial violence that ended with at least eight people dead and erased what had been a thriving community.A Florida State University historian who helped document the massacre for the Florida Legislature is available to speak to media about her work and the history of Rosewood.

Hurricane’s effects killed sturgeon in Apalachicola River

As hurricane Michael churned through the Gulf of Mexico to make landfall near Florida’s Apalachicola River in 2018, it left a sea of destruction in its wake. The path was easy to follow on land, but debris and infrastructure failures also diminished the river’s water quality and led to the death of roughly half the gulf sturgeon population there.

Sharpen Your Ultrasound & EMG Skills at AANEM’s 2023 UltraEMG

The American Association of Neuromuscular &
Electrodiagnostic Medicine (AANEM) is excited to announce the 2023 UltraEMG meeting,
which will be held February 14-17, 2023, in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, at Sonesta Fort Lauderdale
Beach Hotel. Participants will enhance their knowledge of ultrasound (US) and
electromyography (EMG) at this exceptional event through front row, hands-on experiences.

Toxins from Harmful Algae Found in Bull Sharks of Florida’s Indian River Lagoon

The Indian River Lagoon (IRL) is a bull shark nursery habitat crucial to survival and recruitment of Atlantic coast bull sharks. Analysis of 123 samples found the presence of one or more phycotoxin from harmful algal blooms in 82 percent of the bull sharks and their prey items. Findings highlight the potential threat of toxic algae to the IRL’s ecosystem and surrounding human populations that may consume the same prey species. The highest concentrations of most toxins were detected in gut content samples, highlighting dietary exposure as an important mechanism of toxin transfer to bull sharks in the system.

New Critical Period of Embryonic Sex Determination in Sea Turtles Identified

A study shows that the temperature of the incubation environment could influence the sexualization of the gonads (reproductive organs) in sea turtles earlier than what is currently recognized. Researchers developed a new way to integrate the effect of thermal fluctuations on embryonic sex determination and predict sex ratios with much better accuracy than prior models. By measuring the strength of masculinization or feminization of temperatures using novel parameters, they have uncovered how temperature-sensitive sex determination works. These findings could be similar for other reptiles with temperature-dependent sex determination because similar molecular determinants and enzymatic mechanisms are at play.

FAU Awarded $1.8 Million Grant to Improve Pre-K English Proficiency

“PRAISE, Preparing for Readiness and Academic Improvement for pre-School English Learners.” PRAISE is designed to improve the quality of instruction for English language learners and enhance educators’ ability to support preschool English language learners’ readiness for kindergarten. FAU is one of 44 institutions nationwide selected to receive this grant in 2022.

Climate Change Consensus Endures in Florida

Seven sequenced surveys since October 2019 paint a comprehensive picture of Floridians’ climate resilience attitudes during a period of particularly dynamic political, economic and environmental events. Climate change has emerged as an abiding and cross-cutting issue in Florida.

FAU Hurricane Evacuation Expert Available to Discuss Hurricane Ian

Florida Atlantic University’s John Renne, Ph.D., is available to discuss evacuation and other hurricane-related issues with the media. Renne is a professor and director of the Center for Urban and Environmental Solutions. He recently published a first-of-its-kind study, “What Has…

FAU Hurricane Evacuation Expert Available to Discuss Tropical Depression Nine/Hurricane Hermine

Florida Atlantic University’s John Renne, Ph.D., is available to discuss evacuation and other hurricane-related issues with the media. Renne is a professor and director of the Center for Urban and Environmental Solutions. He recently published a first-of-its-kind study, “What Has…

Water Quality Woes in Southwest Florida Linked to Seeping Septic Systems

From fecal bacteria to blue-green algae to red tides, Southwest Florida’s water quality has declined as its population has increased. Multiple lines of evidence from a multi-year microbial source tracking study points to septic systems as a contributing source for this decline. The study is one of few to connect downstream harmful algal blooms with nutrient loading from upstream septic systems. These water quality issues are caused by aging septic systems installed in high densities in areas with shallow water tables. Septic systems may actually be sitting in groundwater during certain times of the year, which means that they cannot function properly.

FAU, Hospital Partners Strategize on Future of Region’s Medical Residencies and Fellowships

FAU Schmidt College of Medicine Graduate Medical Education Consortium leaders recently met to strategize and outline the next phase for graduate medical education and residency programs in Palm Beach County, which they will launch in the fall.

New Tool Will Assess Water Discharge Impacts from Florida’s Everglades

An innovative tool will holistically examine and diagnose key processes with numerical simulations and experiments and predict changes in responses to water management, ecological restoration and climate change. It is designed to provide a suite of environmental and ecological information on the state of the greater Florida Bay ecosystem as well as potential future changes. Importantly, this model could potentially predict underwater aquatic vegetation coverage, harmful algal blooms, and fisheries resources under climate change and/or Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Program management scenarios.

FAU Announces Formation of FAU Health Network

Three South Florida counties that collectively are home to the largest metropolitan population in the state will soon be served by an academic health network that is a true collaboration of the region’s leading public and private academic and medical leaders.

FAU Awarded $1 Million to Help Prevent Injury, Death from Falls in Older Adults

Every second, an older person in the U.S. falls and injures themselves, and every 20 minutes one of them dies from the fall. The Geriatric Emergency Department Fall Injury Prevention Project will investigate several emergency department-based prevention strategies in older patients at high risk for recurrent falls and injury. The tailored multicomponent intervention will identify effective fall prevention strategies that target limited resources to high-risk individuals who come to the emergency department to improve patient outcomes, improve safety, and reduce overall costs of health care.

Study Finds Why Baby Leatherback Marine Turtles Can’t ‘See the Sea’

For most sea turtles, the journey to find the ocean from their nests is pretty straightforward. However, leatherback hatchlings more often crawl around in circles trying to find the ocean. Circling delays their entry into the ocean, wastes energy, and places them at greater danger from natural predators. Under different moon phases: bright light during full moon and only starlight under new moon, researchers have a better understanding of why this circling behavior happens and why it is most commonly observed in leatherbacks.

FAU Receives $28 Million Scholarship Gift to Support Medical Education

FAU’s Schmidt College of Medicine received an estate pledge of $28 million from John and Ann Wood to support scholarships for medical students. This is the largest scholarship gift in FAU’s history and the largest known scholarship gift to a Florida public university’s medical school.

Coastal experts get chance to explore new Gulf-wide research tools and information

Over 800 coastal researchers and managers will get the chance to explore more than 25 regional tools on display April 26 at the Gulf of Mexico Conference (#GOMCON) in Baton Rouge, La. The Tools Café gives participants a unique opportunity to access some of the newest and best tools for coastal resilience, data management, and conservation while learning about these resources directly from developers who created each tool.

Hero’s Encounter: Leading Geriatrician and World War II Veteran Share Bond

An internationally renowned geriatrician and advocate for seniors and a 98-year-old World War II veteran hero are a dynamic duo whose paths recently crossed. They have a common bond: to improve care and quality of life for Americans and people throughout the world.

University of Florida receives $5 million gift from Kenneth C. Griffin to boost critical computer science education for teachers and students

Maya Israel, associate professor of educational technology, will lead a team of researchers and teacher educators in building both a face-to-face and an online community of practice for teacher preparation and expanding computer science education across the state of Florida.