Erosion

FSU experts available to comment for 2021 hurricane season

By: Bill Wellock | Published: April 20, 2021 | 3:15 pm | SHARE: Florida State University faculty are among the world leaders in the study of hurricanes.From forecasting to insurance to ecological aftermath, FSU experts are available to discuss the many ways these storms impact people, property and the environment.These faculty members are available to answer media questions and provide perspective for news stories throughout the 2021 hurricane season, which runs from June 1 through Nov.

Corals Carefully Organize Proteins to Form Rock-Hard Skeletons

Charles Darwin, the British naturalist who championed the theory of evolution, noted that corals form far-reaching structures, largely made of limestone, that surround tropical islands. He didn’t know how they performed this feat. Now, Rutgers scientists have shown that coral structures consist of a biomineral containing a highly organized organic mix of proteins that resembles what is in our bones. Their study, published in the Journal of the Royal Society Interface, shows for the first time that several proteins are organized spatially – a process that’s critical to forming a rock-hard coral skeleton.

NAU geomorphologists map fine sediment in Colorado River ecosystem to improve long-term sandbar management

Matt Kaplinski, a senior research associate in Northern Arizona University’s School of Earth and Sustainability (SES), is the principal investigator on a project, “Long Term Monitoring of Sediment Resources and Channel Substrates of the Colorado River in Grand Canyon National Park,” designed to study how the sandbars in the river may be preserved through conservation management.

“Ghost Forests” Expanding Along Northeast U.S. Coast

Why are “ghost forests” filled with dead trees expanding along the mid-Atlantic and southern New England coast? Higher groundwater levels linked to sea-level rise and increased flooding from storm surges and very high tides are likely the most important factors, according to a Rutgers study on the impacts of climate change that suggests how to enhance land-use planning.

Land Development in New Jersey Continues to Slow

Land development in New Jersey has slowed dramatically since the 2008 Great Recession, but it’s unclear how the COVID-19 pandemic and efforts to fight societal and housing inequality will affect future trends, according to a Rutgers co-authored report. Between 2012 and 2015, 10,392 acres in the Garden State became urban land. That’s 3,464 acres a year – far lower than the 16,852 acres per year in the late 1990s and continuing the trend of decreasing urban development that began in the 2008 Great Recession.

Mangrove Trees Won’t Survive Sea-Level Rise by 2050 if Emissions Aren’t Cut

Mangrove trees – valuable coastal ecosystems found in Florida and other warm climates – won’t survive sea-level rise by 2050 if greenhouse gas emissions aren’t reduced, according to a Rutgers co-authored study in the journal Science. Mangrove forests store large amounts of carbon, help protect coastlines and provide habitat for fish and other species. Using sediment data from the last 10,000 years, an international team led by Macquarie University in Australia estimated the chances of mangrove survival based on rates of sea-level rise.

FSU hurricane experts available to provide analysis throughout the season

By: Bill Wellock | Published: May 4, 2020 | 2:42 pm | SHARE: From prediction to insurance consideration to ecological aftermath, Florida State University experts are among the world leaders in the study of hurricanes and their impact on people, property and the environment. These experts are available to answer media questions and provide perspective for news stories throughout the 2020 hurricane season, which runs from June 1 through Nov.

In Cuba, Cleaner Rivers Follow Greener Farming

For the first time in more than 50 years, a joint team of Cuban and U.S. field scientists studied the water quality of twenty-five Cuban rivers and found little damage after centuries of sugarcane production. They also found nutrient pollution in Cuba’s rivers much lower than the Mississippi River. Cuba’s shift to conservation agriculture after the collapse of the Soviet Union—and reduced use of fertilizers on cropland—may be a primary cause.