MD Anderson’s Boot Walk to End Cancer® to unite thousands virtually on Nov. 6

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center celebrates its sixth annual Boot Walk to End Cancer® on Saturday, Nov. 6. Due to ongoing COVID-19 precautions, the 1.2-mile walk will be held virtually to keep participants, their families and their communities safe. Participants are encouraged to walk a personalized route in their own neighborhoods, whether it be on a trail, track or sidewalk. Registration is open at mdanderson.org/bootwalk.

How high-fat diets allow cancer cells to go unnoticed

A high-fat diet increases the incidence of colorectal cancer. Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Fellow Semir Beyaz and collaborators from Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts Institute of Technology have discovered that in mice, fat disrupts the relationship between intestinal cells and the immune cells that patrol them looking for emerging tumors.

Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center Announces New Early-Career Physician Research Program in Cancer Science

Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSK) today announced a $25 million gift from Louis V. Gerstner, Jr. to create the Louis V. Gerstner, Jr. Physician Scholars Program. Designed to support the innovative research of physician-scientists who are early in their career at MSK, the Gerstner Physician Scholars Program will advance promising scientific research and further the careers of outstanding junior faculty.

Active Living After Cancer program improves physical functioning of breast cancer survivors

Breast cancer survivors who participated in Active Living After Cancer, an evidence-based 12-week group program, markedly increased their physical activity and ability to accomplish the basic pursuits of daily life, researchers from The University of Texas
MD Anderson Cancer Center reported today in Cancer.

MD Anderson Research Highlights for September 22, 2021

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center’s Research Highlights provides a glimpse into recently published studies in basic, translational and clinical cancer research from MD Anderson experts. Current advances include a new method to measure breast cancer response, a new immunotherapy approach for multiple myeloma, characterization of the immune landscape of cholangiocarcinoma, a new contrast agent to improve molecular imaging techniques, and new treatment targets in breast, gynecologic and pancreatic cancers.

Coriell Institute for Medical Research, Van Andel Institute Awarded Estimated $12.4 Million SPORE Grant from National Cancer Institute

The Coriell Institute for Medical Research and Van Andel Institute (VAI) have been awarded a prestigious Specialized Programs of Research Excellence (or SPORE) grant from the National Cancer Institute (award P50CA254897). The five-year grant valued at an estimated $12.4 million will support nearly 20 scientists as they work to improve epigenetic therapies for cancer. The project is co-led by Coriell’s President and CEO Jean-Pierre Issa, MD, Van Andel Institute’s Chief Scientific Officer Peter A. Jones, PhD, DSc (hon), and Johns Hopkins University and VAI’s Stephen Baylin, MD.

Scientists Find a Pair of Proteins Control Supply Lines That Feed Cancer Cells

In human cancer cell and mouse studies, researchers from Johns Hopkins Medicine have found that a set of proteins work in tandem to build supply lines that deliver oxygen and nutrients to tumors, enabling them to survive and grow. The protein twosome, PADI4 and HIF-1, ramp up their activity under low-oxygen conditions that are typically found in a fast-growing tumor, allowing it to build new blood vessels that feed the cancer’s growth.

Antibody-drug conjugate shows impressive activity in patients with non-small cell lung cancer with mutation in HER2 gene

More than half of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) bearing a mutation in the HER2 gene had their tumors stop growing or shrink for an extended time after treatment with a drug that hitches a chemotherapy agent to a highly targeted antibody, an international clinical trial led by investigators at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute has found.

Johns Hopkins Cancer Researcher Ashani Weeraratna Appointed To National Cancer Advisory Board By President Biden

Johns Hopkins scientist Ashani Weeraratna, PhD, a leading cancer researcher who specializes in melanoma and the effects of aging on cancer, has been appointed by President Joe Biden to serve as a member of the National Cancer Advisory Board.

Investigators Uncover Cellular Pathway Involved in Cancer Growth

A hallmark of cancer is its ability to replicate, a process commonly driven by the reactivation of the telomerase enzyme complex, which helps prevent the aging and death of healthy cells and keeps stem cells in bone marrow and the intestines from producing normal cells in those organs. When telomerase is activated in cancer cells, it helps them survive and duplicate in the body.

How a plant virus could protect and save your lungs from metastatic cancer

Using a virus that grows in black-eyed pea plants, researchers developed a new therapy that could keep metastatic cancers from spreading to the lungs, as well as treat established tumors in the lungs.

Um novo entendimento sobre o funcionamento interno da terapia celular CAR-T

Os pesquisadores da Mayo Clinic biomanufaturaram a terapia de células T receptoras de antígenos quiméricos (terapia celular CAR-T) de uma nova maneira, a fim de rastrear a jornada de combate ao câncer das células e prever efeitos tóxicos colaterais.

Nueva perspectiva sobre el funcionamiento interno de la terapia de células T con receptor de antígeno quimérico

Los investigadores de Mayo Clinic manipularon biológicamente y de forma novedosa la terapia de células T con receptor de antígeno quimérico (CAR-T, por sus siglas en inglés) a fin de averiguar cómo es la batalla de las células cancerosas y predecir los efectos secundarios tóxicos.

Researchers identify a novel player in acute myeloid leukemia

A new study led by scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys has shown that the protein RNF5 plays an unusual role in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Unlike its expected role, marking aberrant proteins for destruction, RNF5 binds with a second cell protein called RBBP4 to control expression of genes implicated in AML. These findings, published in Nature Communications, have important implications for improving AML patient outcomes.

Sylvester Researchers Explore Cancer Risks at Surfside Condo Collapse

“We were uniquely positioned to take the evidence gleaned from our ongoing effort to address why firefighters are at increased risk of cancer incidence and mortality and rapidly translate it to a disaster that could augment this risk substantially,” said Dr. Kobetz, Sylvester’s associate director for population sciences and cancer disparity and the University of Miami’s vice provost for research and scholarship. “Our hope is that we and our firefighter colleagues learn together how to mitigate the risks that emerge in a different disaster scenario.”

Right Program Could Turn Immune Cells into Cancer Killers

Cancer-fighting immune cells in patients with lung cancer whose tumors do not respond to immunotherapies appear to be running on a different “program” that makes them less effective than immune cells in patients whose cancers respond to these immune treatments, suggests a new study led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center Bloomberg~Kimmel Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy.

UTHealth researcher awarded CPRIT grant to test potential large-molecule cancer drugs at preclinical development core facility

A preclinical development core where researchers can test the effectiveness of large molecule drug candidates for novel cancer treatments, led by Qingyun Liu, PhD, has been awarded a nearly $4 million grant from the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas (CPRIT).