Study Confirms Effectiveness of New Personalized Approach for Radiation Therapy

Researchers from Cleveland Clinic, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, and Moffitt Cancer Center have found that the genomic adjusted radiation dose (GARD) may be used to personalize radiotherapy (RT) to maximize the therapeutic effect of a given physical RT dose. This research was published Aug. 4 in The Lancet Oncology journal.

Graphic Warning Labels on Cigarette Packaging Changes Perceptions

A Herbert Wertheim School of Public Health and Human Longevity Science at University of California San Diego clinical trial showed that graphic warning labels on cigarette packaging changes perceptions of smokers to recognize the negative consequences of tobacco and consider quitting.

Study finds cancer-related follow-up care is underutilized among young adult survivors of childhood cancer

A research team, led by Joel Milam, PhD, professor of epidemiology and biostatistics at the UCI Program in Public Health, is examining gaps and disparities in lifelong follow-up among survivors, including taking a closer look at long term follow-up care plans, specifically for underserved populations. The study shows that age and ethnic background is associated with inadequate follow-up care among young adult childhood cancer survivors.

Experimental Model of Ovarian Cancer Shows Effect of Healthy Cell Arrangement in Metastasis

A key element to slowing metastasis in ovarian cancer is understanding the mechanisms of how tumor cells invade tissues. In APL Bioengineering, biophysics researchers explain how microscopic defects in how healthy cells line up can alter how easily ovarian cancer cells invade tissue. Using an experimental model, the group found that disruptions in the normal cellular layout, called topological defects, affect the rate of tumor cell invasion.

Johns Hopkins Study: Anti-Parasitic Drug Slows Pancreatic Cancer in Mice

As the third-most lethal cancer in the United States, with only a 1% five-year survival rate for people with its most aggressive form, pancreatic cancer has long been a target of researchers who search for ways to slow or stop its growth and spread. Now, a team of Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers have found that an anti-parasitic drug prevents pancreatic cancer’s initiation, progression and metastasis in genetically engineered mice.

Shih-Ting (Christine) Wang: Designing Materials for Biomedicine

Using DNA-based assembly, the Center for Functional Nanomaterials postdoc has assembled functional proteins into ordered lattices and coated nanostructures for drug delivery.

Loyola Medicine to Offer Free Cancer Screenings to Uninsured Women during See, Test and Treat® Event

On Saturday, August 14, 2021, qualified women who make an appointment can receive free cervical and breast cancer screenings as part of Loyola Medicine’s 6th annual See, Test and Treat® event. See, Test and Treat® will be held at the Loyola Outpatient Center, 2160 S. First Ave., Maywood, Illinois. Interested women are invited to call 708-216-7284 to verify eligibility and make an appointment.

MD Anderson announces 2021 class of Andrew Sabin Family Fellows

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center has named 10 early career faculty members to the 2021 class of Andrew Sabin Family Fellows. Established by philanthropist Andrew Sabin through a generous $30 million endowment in 2015, the Sabin Family Fellowship program encourages creativity, innovation and impactful cancer research at MD Anderson in the areas of basic science, clinical, physician-scientist and population and quantitative science.

World Trade Center Responders with the Greatest Exposure to Toxic Dust Have a Higher Likelihood of Liver Disease

Mount Sinai researchers have found evidence for the first time that World Trade Center responders had a higher likelihood of developing liver disease if they arrived at the site right after the attacks as opposed to working at Ground Zero later in the rescue and recovery efforts. Their study links the increase in liver disease risk to the quantity of toxic dust the workers were exposed to, which was greatest immediately after the September 11, 2001, attacks.

Dr. Beth Karlan receives lifetime achievement award for contributions to gynecologic oncology

Internationally renowned physician-scientist Dr. Beth Karlan, director of cancer population genetics at the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, is being honored with the Lifetime Achievement Award from the International Gynecologic Cancer Society (IGCS) for her contributions to gynecologic cancer research and clinical practice.

Mayo Clinic scientists advance breast, ovarian cancer research with cryo-electron microscopy

Using advanced imaging technology, Mayo Clinic scientists have provided an unprecedented understanding of the BRCA1-BARD1 protein complex, which is often mutated in patients with breast or ovarian cancer. Their paper, published in Nature, identifies aspects of how BRCA1-BARD1 functions, supporting future translational research, cancer prevention efforts and drug development.

Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center Recognized as One of the Best Hospitals for Cancer Care by U.S. News & World Report for the 32nd Year in a Row; Ranked #1 Nationally for Ear, Nose, and Throat Care

Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSK) has been recognized as the number two hospital for cancer care in the nation by U.S. News & World Report in its annual Best Hospitals listing. Since these prestigious rankings were established more than 30 years ago, MSK has consistently ranked among the top two cancer hospitals in the country.

UC San Diego Health Ranked #1 by U.S. News & World Report

UC San Diego Health, the region’s only academic health system, is ranked #1 in San Diego and #5 in California, placing it among the nation’s best hospitals, according to the 2021-2022 U.S. News & World Report survey. UC San Diego Health was ranked in the top 50 in 10 specialties.

Rush University Medical Center Again on U.S. News & World Report Honor Roll

Of the more than 3,000 U.S. hospitals evaluated, Rush University Medical Center ranked No. 19 in the nation by U.S. News & World Report, with nine of specialties rated among the country’s very best.

Mount Sinai Researchers Develop Novel Therapy That Could Be Effective in Many Cancers

Mount Sinai researchers have developed a therapeutic agent that shows high effectiveness in vitro at disrupting a biological pathway that helps cancer survive, according to a paper published in Cancer Discovery, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research, in July.

Mount Sinai researchers develop novel therapy that could be effective in many cancers

New York, NY (July 23, 2021) — Mount Sinai researchers have developed a therapeutic agent that shows high effectiveness in vitro at disrupting a biological pathway that helps cancer survive, according to a paper published in Cancer Discovery , a…

Mayo Clinic research suggests women over 65 be offered hereditary cancer genetic testing

A new study by Fergus Couch, Ph.D., of Mayo Clinic Cancer Center, along with collaborators from the CARRIERS consortium, suggests that most women with breast cancer diagnosed over 65 should be offered hereditary cancer genetic testing. The study was published Thursday, July 22, in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Study of Cancer Patients and COVID-19 Highlights Health Disparities

Findings from a study led by researchers at Henry Ford Cancer Institute, in collaboration with Advocate Aurora Health, the Food and Drug Administration and Syapse®, show an elevated risk for severe COVID-19 effects or death among patients with cancer, with the highest risk being among low-income and Black patients.

Bidirectional impact of cardiovascular disease, cancer in Blacks focus of new AHA center

Cardiovascular disease and cancer, the nation’s top two killers, share common ground like obesity and chronic inflammation, as well as a disproportionate impact on Black Americans. A new American Heart Association-funded center at the Medical College of Georgia is working…

Investigational magnetic device shrinks glioblastoma in first-in-world human test

Houston Methodist Neurological Institute researchers from the department of neurosurgery shrunk a deadly glioblastoma tumor by more than a third using a helmet generating a noninvasive oscillating magnetic field that the patient wore on his head while administering the therapy…