‘Fortunate Accident’ May Yield Immunity Weapon Against Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria

In what turned out to be one of the most important accidents of all time, Scottish bacteriologist Alexander Fleming returned to his laboratory after a vacation in 1928 to find a clear zone surrounding a piece of mold that had infiltrated a petri dish full of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), a common skin bacterium he was growing.

Trojan horses and tunneling nanotubes: Ebola virus research at Texas Biomed gets NIH funding boost

Scientists have a general idea of how viruses invade and spread in the body, but the precise mechanisms are actually not well understood, especially when it comes to Ebola virus. Olena Shtanko, Ph.D., a Staff Scientist at the Texas Biomedical Research Institute (Texas Biomed), has received more than $1 million from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to explore different aspects of Ebola virus infection.

Study Explores Regulatory Role for White Blood Cells in Recruitment of Brown Fat

Article title: Thermogenic recruitment of brown and brite/beige adipose tissues is not obligatorily associated with macrophage accretion or attrition Authors: Nathalie Boulet, Ineke H.N. Luijten, Barbara Cannon, Jan Nedergaard From the authors: “A regulatory or mediatory role—positive or negative—for macrophages…

Protein that Keeps Immune System from Freaking Out Could Form Basis for New Therapeutics

Treatment with a peptide that mimics the naturally occurring protein GIV prevents immune overreaction and supports a mechanism critical for survival in mouse models of sepsis and colitis, according to a UC San Diego study.

Research News Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins Medicine

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Johns Hopkins Medicine Media Relations is focused on disseminating current, accurate and useful information to the public via the media. As part of that effort, we are distributing our “COVID-19 Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins” every Tuesday throughout the duration of the outbreak.

Researchers Identify a Protein That Is Critical for Wound Healing after a Central Nervous System Injury

after a Central Nervous System Injury

(New York – March 2, 2020) Plexin-B2, an axon guidance protein in the central nervous system (CNS), plays an important role in wound healing and neural repair following spinal cord injury (SCI), according to research conducted at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published today in Nature Neuroscience.