Eligible younger U.S. adults less likely to meet recommended colorectal cancer screening guidelines and face greater disparities

Younger adults living in the U.S. are less likely to be screened for colorectal cancer than older U.S. adults, despite now being eligible under new screening guidelines, and face greater disparities than older U.S. adults who are eligible for screening, according to research from UTHealth Houston.

Roswell Park Researchers Identify Molecular ‘Glue’ That Sticks to and Degrades a Cancer-Causing Protein

A small molecule discovered and developed by a team of scientists led by Fengzhi Li, PhD, Associate Professor of Oncology in the Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics at Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center, eliminates human pancreatic and colorectal tumor cells by binding to and degrading DDX5, a powerful cancer-causing protein.

Study Finds COVID-19 Pandemic Reduced Breast, Cervical, Colorectal Cancer Screenings by Millions in 2020

New findings led by researchers at the American Cancer Society show the number of women in the United States who reported having a recent (in the past year) breast cancer or cervical cancer screening dropped by 2.13 million (6%) and 4.47 million (11%) respectively in 2020 compared to 2018. The study is the first of its kind to evaluate the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on cancer screenings nationally using population-based data.

DeepGI AI – A Thai Innovation for the Precision in Colorectal Polyp Detection

Chula Engineering and Chula Medicine co-invent an innovative device for a rapid gastrointestinal cancer detection that yields accurate results hoping to foster preventive medicine in gastrointestinal malignancy and reduce the number of cancer patients.

New Research Finds Computer Assisted Colonoscopy Identify More Precancerous Polyps Compared to Traditional Colonoscopy

Colonoscopies performed with artificial intelligence saw an increase in the overall rate of detection of adenoma, or cancerous and precancerous polyps, according to new data presented at the 2022 Digestive Disease Week Annual Meeting.

Does Multiple Sclerosis Play a Role in Cancer Screening and Diagnosis?

Women with multiple sclerosis (MS) are less likely to have breast cancers detected through cancer screenings than women without MS, according to new research published in the April 27, 2022, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. Conversely, researchers also found that people with MS are more likely to have colorectal cancers detected at an early stage than those without MS.

November Issue of The American Journal of Gastroenterology Discusses Association Between BMI and Early-Onset Colorectal Cancer Risk, PPIs and All-Cause Mortality

The November issue of The American Journal of Gastroenterology features several articles examining the association between common conditions or treatments and the risk for disease development, including a study on the association between higher body mass index and increased risk for early-onset colorectal cancer, and a population study on proton pump inhibitors and all-cause mortality.

New Clinical Advances in Gastroenterology Presented at the American College of Gastroenterology’s 86th Annual Scientific Meeting

Featured science includes increased incidence of pancreatic cancer among young women, quality of life improvements in IBD, colorectal cancer risk from weight loss surgery and medications, and more

New Noninvasive Tests for Colon and Prostate Cancer Presented at the 2021 AACC Annual Scientific Meeting

Two research teams have developed new noninvasive tests that use either blood or saliva samples to diagnose cases of colorectal cancer or prostate cancer, respectively. Presented today at the 2021 AACC Annual Scientific Meeting & Clinical Lab Expo, these tests could facilitate screening efforts for colorectal cancer and allow clinicians to better distinguish early-stage prostate cancer from more benign prostate conditions.

Maternal obesity during pregnancy linked to higher risk of colorectal cancer in adult offspring

Infants whose mothers were obese during pregnancy may have a heightened risk of developing colorectal cancer later in life, according to new research led by public health experts at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth).

Mechanism for Development of Rare Colorectal Cancer Subtype Identified

Researchers from Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, the state’s only National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center, recently discovered a mechanism to explain what drives the formation of mucinous colorectal adenocarcinoma (MAC), a rare subtype of colorectal cancer.

Tumor cell PD-L1 may mediate sensitivity to chemotherapy in colorectal cancer treatment

Data in a study by Mayo Clinic Cancer Center researchers indicates that the level of tumor cell PD-L1, a protein that acts as a brake to keep the body’s immune responses under control, may be an important factor for sensitivity to chemotherapy in colorectal cancer treatment. The study was published Friday, July 2, in Oncogene.

New Patient Guide from NCCN Jumpstarts Important Conversations About Anal Cancer

New and updated patient and caregiver resources from National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) offer jargon-free, state-of-the-art information on diagnosis, treatment, and surveillance for anal, colon, and rectal cancers.

Research News Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins Medicine

NEWS STORIES IN THIS ISSUE:
– Study Says Failure to Rid Amyloid Beta Protein from Brain May Lead to Alzheimer’s Disease
– Johns Hopkins Medicine Team Discovers Novel Mediator of Once Mysterious Chronic Itch – Study Suggests Molecular Changes in Tissue Microenvironment May Promote Colorectal Cancer
– Researchers ID Anti-Inflammatory Proteins as Therapy Targets for Nasal and Sinus Problem
– Johns Hopkins Children’s Center Receives NIH Award to Study Dangerous Pediatric Disease

Global Event Will Advance Early Age Onset Colorectal Cancer Research

In many countries around the world, patients under age 50 are fighting, some dying, of colon and rectal cancers. Early-Age Onset Colorectal Cancer is an urgent issue in cancer research and patient care around the globe. We all want to know why this is happening, fully aware that for some, time is running out.

Patient reactions to colorectal cancer estimated to become the leading cause of cancer-related deaths for those 20-49 by 2030

In a recent JAMA publication, researchers predict, “For the age group 20-49, colorectal cancer was estimated to become the leading cause of cancer-related deaths by 2030.” Fight Colorectal Cancer (Fight CRC), the nation’s leading advocacy organization, is committed to amplifying…

Rock Musicians Rufus Wainwright, Lisa Loeb, Tim Reynolds and More to Perform Free Virtual Concert for Colorectal Cancer Awareness

The American College of Gastroenterology Invites All to “Tune It Up: A Concert To Raise Awareness of Colorectal Cancer” Free Webstream Event Open to All on March 31, 2021 at 8:00 pm EDT

Drug used during pregnancy may increase cancer risk in mother’s adult children

Exposure in the womb to a drug used to prevent miscarriage appears to raise the offspring’s cancer risk decades later, especially for colorectal and prostate cancers, researchers have found. They will present the results of their new study Tuesday at ENDO 2021, the Endocrine Society’s annual meeting.

GI OnDEMAND Announces Partnership with Ambry Genetics for Genetic Testing and Counseling Services

GI OnDEMAND®, gastroenterology’s leading multidisciplinary virtual integrated care platform today announced a partnership with Ambry Genetics®, a leading clinical genetic testing company, to integrate online genetic counseling and testing services into gastroenterology practices nationwide. This partnership addresses a critical clinical need for identifying hereditary GI cancer syndromes to help guide potentially life-altering health care decisions.
GI OnDEMAND, a joint venture between the American College of Gastroenterology and Gastro Girl, Inc., will now offer the CARE (Comprehensive, Assessment, Risk, and Education) Program™ from Ambry Genetics.

American College of Gastroenterology Issues Updated Colorectal Cancer Screening Guidelines

The American College of Gastroenterology has issued updated evidence-based screening guidelines for colorectal cancer (CRC), including a new recommendation to begin CRC screening at age 45 for average risk adults. Key updates include recommendations for screening individuals with family history of CRC or polyps, guidance on the use of aspirin to reduce the risk of CRC, quality indicators for adenoma detection rate and colonoscopy withdrawal time, as well as suggestions about evidence-based interventions to boost screening rates, especially among African Americans. The authors distinguish between one-step screening tests, such as colonoscopy, and two-step screening tests that require colonoscopy, if positive, in order to complete the screening process.

Putting the Spotlight on Colorectal Cancer Risk and Prevention during Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month

Colorectal Cancer Screening Saves Lives Colorectal cancer is the third most common cause of cancer related death for both men and women. However, if it is caught early, colorectal cancer has a 90% survival rate. This is why screening is…

Liquid biopsy for colorectal cancer could guide therapy for tumors

A new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis demonstrates that a liquid biopsy examining blood or urine can help gauge the effectiveness of therapy for colorectal cancer that has just begun to spread beyond the original tumor. Such a biopsy can detect lingering disease and could serve as a guide for deciding whether a patient should undergo further treatments.

MD Anderson and Mirati Therapeutics announce KRAS strategic research and development collaboration in solid tumors

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center and Mirati Therapeutics, Inc. today announced a strategic research and development collaboration to expand the evaluation of Mirati’s two investigational small molecule, potent and selective KRAS inhibitors – adagrasib (MRTX849), a G12C inhibitor in clinical development, and MRTX1133, a G12D inhibitor in preclinical development, as monotherapy and in combination with other agents – which target two of the most frequent KRAS mutations in cancer.