Rock Musicians Rufus Wainwright, Lisa Loeb, Tim Reynolds and More to Perform Free Virtual Concert for Colorectal Cancer Awareness

The American College of Gastroenterology Invites All to “Tune It Up: A Concert To Raise Awareness of Colorectal Cancer” Free Webstream Event Open to All on March 31, 2021 at 8:00 pm EDT

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Drug used during pregnancy may increase cancer risk in mother’s adult children

Exposure in the womb to a drug used to prevent miscarriage appears to raise the offspring’s cancer risk decades later, especially for colorectal and prostate cancers, researchers have found. They will present the results of their new study Tuesday at ENDO 2021, the Endocrine Society’s annual meeting.

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GI OnDEMAND Announces Partnership with Ambry Genetics for Genetic Testing and Counseling Services

GI OnDEMAND®, gastroenterology’s leading multidisciplinary virtual integrated care platform today announced a partnership with Ambry Genetics®, a leading clinical genetic testing company, to integrate online genetic counseling and testing services into gastroenterology practices nationwide. This partnership addresses a critical clinical need for identifying hereditary GI cancer syndromes to help guide potentially life-altering health care decisions.
GI OnDEMAND, a joint venture between the American College of Gastroenterology and Gastro Girl, Inc., will now offer the CARE (Comprehensive, Assessment, Risk, and Education) Program™ from Ambry Genetics.

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American College of Gastroenterology Issues Updated Colorectal Cancer Screening Guidelines

The American College of Gastroenterology has issued updated evidence-based screening guidelines for colorectal cancer (CRC), including a new recommendation to begin CRC screening at age 45 for average risk adults. Key updates include recommendations for screening individuals with family history of CRC or polyps, guidance on the use of aspirin to reduce the risk of CRC, quality indicators for adenoma detection rate and colonoscopy withdrawal time, as well as suggestions about evidence-based interventions to boost screening rates, especially among African Americans. The authors distinguish between one-step screening tests, such as colonoscopy, and two-step screening tests that require colonoscopy, if positive, in order to complete the screening process.

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Putting the Spotlight on Colorectal Cancer Risk and Prevention during Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month

Colorectal Cancer Screening Saves Lives Colorectal cancer is the third most common cause of cancer related death for both men

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Liquid biopsy for colorectal cancer could guide therapy for tumors

A new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis demonstrates that a liquid biopsy examining blood or urine can help gauge the effectiveness of therapy for colorectal cancer that has just begun to spread beyond the original tumor. Such a biopsy can detect lingering disease and could serve as a guide for deciding whether a patient should undergo further treatments.

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MD Anderson and Mirati Therapeutics announce KRAS strategic research and development collaboration in solid tumors

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center and Mirati Therapeutics, Inc. today announced a strategic research and development collaboration to expand the evaluation of Mirati’s two investigational small molecule, potent and selective KRAS inhibitors – adagrasib (MRTX849), a G12C inhibitor in clinical development, and MRTX1133, a G12D inhibitor in preclinical development, as monotherapy and in combination with other agents – which target two of the most frequent KRAS mutations in cancer.

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Strange colon discovery explains racial disparities in colorectal cancer

The colons of African-Americans and people of European descent age differently, new research reveals, helping explain racial disparities in colorectal cancer – the cancer that killed beloved “Black Panther” star Chadwick Boseman.

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Fight CRC To Present Research Findings on The Impact of COVID-19 on the Colorectal Cancer Community at 2021 GI ASCO

Fight Colorectal Cancer presents abstract at Gastrointestinal Cancer Symposium highlighting the need to address the barriers and opportunities for care within the colorectal cancer community during the COVID-19 pandemic

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CDC Awards Huntsman Cancer Institute $3 Million to Increase Colorectal Cancer Screening Rates

Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah has been awarded a five-year, $3 million grant from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to improve Utah’s colorectal cancer screening rates. This funding will provide colorectal cancer screening and follow-up services to people between 50 and 75 years of age through partnership with health systems across Utah.

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Henry Ford Health System is First in the U.S. to Perform Procedure Using CG-100 Device for Colorectal Cancer Patients

Henry Ford Health System is the first in the country to perform a procedure using the CG-100 intraluminal device, which is temporarily inserted into the gastrointestinal tract and designed to reduce diverting stoma rates, and the need for an ostomy bag, in patients undergoing gastrointestinal resection procedures due to colorectal cancer treatment.

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December Issue of The American Journal of Gastroenterology Highlights Health Disparities and Social Determinants of Health

The December issue of The American Journal of Gastroenterology is now available and features new clinical research across a wide range of gastroenterology and hepatology topics, including health disparities, colorectal cancer, cirrhosis, pediatric gastroenterology, the environmental impact of endoscopy, and more.

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Multiple Sclerosis May Not Put You at Risk for Breast, Colorectal Cancers

People with multiple sclerosis (MS) may not be at higher risk of developing two of the three cancers that occur most commonly in people with MS, breast and colorectal cancer, than people who don’t have the disease, according to a new study published in the November 25, 2020, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. However, the study did find that people with MS had a higher incidence of bladder cancer.

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American College of Gastroenterology Announces Winners of Sixth Annual SCOPYs: Service Award for Colorectal Cancer Outreach, Prevention, and Year-Round Excellence

The American College of Gastroenterology (ACG) announces the winners of the 2020 SCOPY Awards (Service Award for Colorectal Cancer Outreach, Prevention, and Year-Round Excellence) to recognize the achievements of ACG members in their community engagement, education and awareness efforts for colorectal cancer prevention.

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Scientists kill cancer cells by “shutting the door” to the nucleus

Scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute have shown that blocking the construction of nuclear pores complexes—large channels that control the flow of materials in and out of the cell nucleus—shrank aggressive tumors in mice while leaving healthy cells unharmed. The study, published in Cancer Discovery, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research, reveals a new Achilles heel for cancer that may lead to better treatments for deadly tumors such as melanoma, leukemia and colorectal cancer.

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KRAS inhibitor sotorasib appears safe, achieves durable clinical benefit in early trial

For patients with advanced solid cancers and KRAS G12C mutations, the targeted therapy sotorasib, a KRAS G12C inhibitor, resulted in manageable toxicities and durable clinical benefits, particularly in lung and colorectal cancer, in Phase I study

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Daily coffee consumption associated with improved survival in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer

In a large group of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer, consumption of a few cups of coffee a day was associated with longer survival and a lower risk of the cancer worsening, researchers at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and other organizations report in a new study.

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To Reduce Colorectal Cancer Disparities among African American Men, More Intervention Research Is Urgently Needed

African American men have the lowest five-year survival rate for colorectal cancer (CRC) out of any other racial group. A major factor is low adherence to recommended early detection screening. Yet published research on effective strategies to increase screening for this group specifically are minimal. These findings were published today in PLOS ONE.

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High-risk Patients for Colorectal Cancer Lack Knowledge About Colonoscopy

Many clinicians rely on self-reports from their high-risk patients about their need and proper interval for repeat surveillance colonoscopy. Researchers analyzed data over four years to explore the knowledge of these high-risk patients. Twenty-eight percent were unaware of either the need for a repeat colonoscopy or the proper surveillance interval. Of these, 16.6 percent were unaware of the proper three-year interval to obtain a follow-up surveillance colonoscopy. Also, 12 percent were not even aware that they required a follow-up surveillance colonoscopy.

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Center for Asian Health Equity awarded $4.25 million CDC grant to prevent colorectal cancer in Illinois

The University of Chicago Medicine’s Center for Asian Health Equity has received a five-year, $4.25 million federal grant to increase colorectal cancer screenings, particularly among underserved and rural Illinois communities.

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Cancer Care Can’t Wait

Further delaying your preventative cancer care may cause more harm than good. Expert from Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey explains how most colorectal cancers can be prevented through regular screenings, and it is safe to get your screenings, even during these difficult times.

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Memorial Sloan Kettering Awards & Appointments

Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSK) announces its most recent awards and appointments for the institution’s physicians, scientists, nurses, and staff.

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MSK: Cancer Isn’t Sheltering in Place

As the height of the COVID-19 outbreak in New York City and the Tri-State area begins to subside, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center oncologists are urging patients to schedule cancer screenings and treatments now – as the long-term toll of missed diagnoses and delayed treatments could be devastating for patients and their loved ones across the region and the country.

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Identical Mice, Different Gut Bacteria, Different Levels of Cancer

Some types of gut bacteria are better than others at stimulating certain immune cells, specifically CD8+ T cells. And while these CD8+ T cells normally help protect the body against cancer, overstimulating them may promote inflammation and exhaust the T cells — which can actually increase susceptibility to cancer, according to new mouse model study published in Cell Reports.

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Research News Tip Sheet: Story Ideas From Johns Hopkins

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Johns Hopkins Medicine Media Relations is focused on disseminating current, accurate and useful information to the public via the media. As part of that effort, we are distributing our “COVID-19 Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins” every Tuesday, throughout the duration of the outbreak.

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Colorectal Cancer Q&A: The Truth about Screening, Prevention, and More

A colonoscopy is the best way to screen for and prevent colorectal cancer (CRC) because it allows your doctor to find and remove precancerous growths called polyps before they have a chance to turn into cancer.

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends that most people have colonoscopy screenings starting at age 50. People who are at a higher risk for CRC due to family history or other factors should begin having screenings at a younger age based on their doctor’s recommendation.

Cologuard, an at-home test, is not a preventive CRC screening tool because it detects cancer after you develop it.

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