Department of Energy Awards 18 Million Node-Hours of Computing Time to Support Cutting-Edge Research

Today, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced that 18 million node-hours have been awarded to 45 scientific projects under the Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) Leadership Computing Challenge (ALCC) program. The projects, with applications ranging from advanced energy systems to climate change to cancer research, will use DOE supercomputers to uncover unique insights about scientific problems that would otherwise be impossible to solve using experimental approaches.

MD Anderson Research Highlights for June 29, 2022

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center’s Research Highlights provides a glimpse into recent basic, translational and clinical cancer research from MD Anderson experts. Current advances include a lower-intensity therapy for acute myeloid leukemia, a new target for treating chronic myelomonocytic leukemia, real-world synthetic controls for clinical trials in rare cancers, a potential biomarker to predict endocrine therapy response in breast cancer, integrated CRISPR screens to identify novel tumor suppressors, and a deeper knowledge of the immune tumor microenvironment in melanoma-derived brain metastases.

Dynamic cells linked to brain tumor growth and recurrence

Tumors are made up of many types of cells, both cancerous and benign. The specific complexity of the cells inside brain tumors has been a trademark of the disease, one that makes treatment extremely difficult. While scientists have long known about the variety of cells within a brain tumor, the ways these tumors grow has relied on the understanding that the cells are static, unmoving and relatively fixed.

The Mark Foundation for Cancer Research Expands Partnership with The Johns Hopkins University to Accelerate Groundbreaking Immunotherapy Research

The Mark Foundation for Cancer Research and the Bloomberg~Kimmel Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy (BKI) announced today a new $10 million commitment at The Johns Hopkins University to fund novel work and advance immunotherapy research to provide lifesaving breakthroughs to people with cancer.

Brooke Emerling awarded $2.3 million to demystify breast cancer metabolism

Brooke Emerling from Sanford Burnham Prebys has been awarded a new grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to continue her work on cellular signaling in cancer. The four-year, $2.3 million project could accelerate the development of new therapies for a range of cancers, particularly metastatic breast cancer. It also offers an answer to a longstanding mystery in cancer metabolism.

The Lancet Publishes Sylvester-Led Study Defining New Standard of Care for Prostate Cancer Recurrence After Prostatectomy

Adding short-term hormone therapy and pelvic lymph node radiotherapy to standard of care prostatectomy surgical bed treatment benefits prostate cancer patients whose prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels are rising post prostatectomy, according to an international study led by Alan Pollack, M.D.,…

Sylvester Researchers Study Vaginal Microbiome’s Role in Screening for Endometrial Cancer

The vaginal microbiome differentiates benign disease from endometrial cancer and can even provide insight about the specific endometrial cancer type and disease severity, according to a study by investigators at Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of Miami Miller School of…

Existing Cancer Therapy in Narrow Use Shows Significant Activity against Other Cancers

A drug currently used in just 1% of cancers has significant potential against the remaining 99%, according to a new study from UH Seidman Cancer Center and Case Western Reserve University, published in the prestigious journal Nature Cancer. Ivosidenib, or AG-120, is currently used against cancers that have a mutation in the IDH1 gene. However, study results show that Ivosidenib is also effective against unmutated, or “wild-type” IDH1. The protein coded by the IDH1 gene in cancers helps cancer cells survive in a stressful tumor environment, so any inhibitor medication that could weaken this defense mechanism is considered a promising therapy. UH and CWRU scientists discovered that under conditions present in the tumor microenvironment, drugs previously believed to be selective for the mutant enzyme have activity against the normal protein. Specifically, low glucose and magnesium levels enhance drug activity. The team has now tested Ivosidenib in mouse models of pancreatic, colorectal, o

Oral Pill Improves Care of Patients with Bone Marrow Cancer: Study

Momelotinib, an oral pill taken once a day, significantly improved outcomes of patients treated for myelofibrosis (MF), a rare but fatal bone marrow cancer, researchers reported June 7. Ruben Mesa, MD, FACP, executive director of the Mays Cancer Center, home to UT Health San Antonio MD Anderson Cancer Center, presented results of the MOMENTUM phase 3 randomized study, which evaluated momelotinib against a second medication, danazol, in symptomatic and anemic MF patients previously treated with standard-of-care JAK inhibitor therapy.

Improved progression-free survival in multiple myeloma patients following three-drug therapy with autologous stem cell transplant

Patients with multiple myeloma who have been treated with a three-drug combination therapy have a growing number of choices for subsequent treatment. Results of a new study led by researchers at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute can help patients and their physicians weigh benefits and risks of each option.

Targeted Drug Achieves 43% Response Rate in KRAS-mutated Lung Cancer

Nearly 43% of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) whose lung cancers harbored a specific KRAS mutation responded to the experimental drug adagrasib, and the targeted agent also showed activity against lesions in the brain that metastasized from the lung tumors, according to results of a study led by Dana-Farber Cancer Institute investigators.

Targeted agents, combination therapies, and clinical trial equity headline Dana-Farber research at ASCO Annual Meeting

Several phase 3 studies conducted by researchers from Dana-Farber Cancer Institute show promising results for patients with multiple myeloma and breast cancer. The results of these studies, along with dozens of others led by Dana-Farber researchers, will be presented at the 2022 Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO).

University of Kentucky Receives Renewed $11.4 Million Grant to Further Cancer Research

The University of Kentucky’s Center for Cancer and Metabolism (CCM) will continue its critical mission to research the metabolism of cancer with a renewed Centers of Biomedical Research Excellence (COBRE) grant award from the National Institutes of General Medical Sciences, part of the National Institutes of Health.

The prestigious grant — totaling $11.4 million — will continue to fund UK’s CCM over the next five years.

Montefiore Einstein Cancer Center Researchers Receive Price Family Foundation Health Equity Research Awards

The National Cancer Institute-designated Montefiore Einstein Cancer Center (MECC) has partnered with the Price Family Foundation to fund eight research teams developing novel cancer therapies and improving cancer outcomes for historically marginalized communities in the Bronx.

Groundbreaking for Major Expansion of University of Maryland Greenebaum Comprehensive Cancer Center

The University of Maryland Medical Center celebrates the groundbreaking of a nine-story patient care tower – the Roslyn and Leonard Stoler Center for Advanced Medicine – that will become the new home of the University of Maryland Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Comprehensive Cancer Center. The $219 million building will enable the cancer center to provide the most technologically advanced, integrated care to cancer patients throughout Maryland and the region well into the future

Discovery of cell protein that keeps Kaposi’s sarcoma herpesvirus dormant

A study led by UC Davis Cancer Center identified a binding protein in cancer cell’s nucleus, known as CHD4, as a critical agent keeping Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) dormant and undetected by the body’s immune system. CHD4 is linked to cancer cell growth in many types of cancers.

Extensive Research Underway to Address Cancer Disparities

To highlight the importance of lifesaving cancer research, National Cancer Research Month, led by the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR), is recognized during May. Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey together with RWJBarnabas Health, the state’s only National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center, has curated a selection of ongoing research focusing on cancer disparities which features members from the Cancer Health Equity Center of Excellence.

NCCN Foundation Announces Awards for Rising Cancer Research Leaders

National Comprehensive Cancer Network’s Oncology Research Program to oversee projects from early-career investigators advancing key areas for study in cancer care and biology, such as novel combination therapy, equitable access to cellular therapies, immune cell dysfunction, liquid biomarkers, genetic ancestry, oncogenic vulnerabilities, and MAIT cell antitumor activity.

Albert Einstein Cancer Center Researcher Receives NCI Outstanding Investigator Award to Study Two Deadly Blood Diseases

Ulrich G. Steidl, M.D., Ph.D., co-director of the Blood Cancer Institute and associate director of basic science at the Albert Einstein Cancer Center (AECC), has received a prestigious Outstanding Investigator Award from the National Cancer Institute (NCI).

$2.1 Million Gift Launches Comprehensive Breast Cancer Database

Philanthropists Richard and Carol Dean Hertzberg have committed $2.1 million to develop and maintain the Dean-Hertzberg Breast Cancer Database System Initiative at UC San Diego Health Moores Cancer Center to support the work of Anne Wallace, MD and her collaborators at Moores Cancer Center.

Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center Announces New Early-Career Physician Research Program in Cancer Science

Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSK) today announced a $25 million gift from Louis V. Gerstner, Jr. to create the Louis V. Gerstner, Jr. Physician Scholars Program. Designed to support the innovative research of physician-scientists who are early in their career at MSK, the Gerstner Physician Scholars Program will advance promising scientific research and further the careers of outstanding junior faculty.

‘Research autopsy’ helps scientists study why certain cancer therapies stop working

A new research study at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center – Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute (OSUCCC – James) turns cancer scientists into molecular detectives, searching for clues for why certain cancers are able to spread and evolve by studying tissues collected within hours of death.

Are Too Many Phase III Cancer Clinical Trials Set Up to Fail?

New research in JNCCN finds four out of five cancer therapies tested in Phase III trials do not achieve clinically-meaningful benefit in prolonging survival, and is the first study to quantify the number of false-positive, false-negative, and true-negative trial results.

Coriell Institute for Medical Research, Van Andel Institute Awarded Estimated $12.4 Million SPORE Grant from National Cancer Institute

The Coriell Institute for Medical Research and Van Andel Institute (VAI) have been awarded a prestigious Specialized Programs of Research Excellence (or SPORE) grant from the National Cancer Institute (award P50CA254897). The five-year grant valued at an estimated $12.4 million will support nearly 20 scientists as they work to improve epigenetic therapies for cancer. The project is co-led by Coriell’s President and CEO Jean-Pierre Issa, MD, Van Andel Institute’s Chief Scientific Officer Peter A. Jones, PhD, DSc (hon), and Johns Hopkins University and VAI’s Stephen Baylin, MD.