NCCN Announces Funding for Bladder Cancer Research Projects, in Collaboration with Pfizer and EMD Serono

The National Comprehensive Cancer Network’s Oncology Research Program selects projects focused on improving patient care and outcomes in locally advanced or metastatic bladder cancer.

Cleveland Clinic Receives $12 Million NIH Grant to Investigate Use of Inflammatory Cytokines in Personalized Cancer Treatments

Cleveland Clinic’s Lerner Research Institute was awarded a five-year $12 million grant by the National Cancer Institute, part of the National Institutes of Health, to define how cytokines – proteins produced during immune response – regulate inflammation and interact with cells and molecules surrounding tumors.

Radiation-hormone therapy combination may slow growth of oligometastatic prostate cancer

A new study offers a new option to patients with oligometastatic prostate cancer who want relief from hormone therapy without compromising the risk of their disease spreading. In the study, patients who received radiation in addition to intermittent hormone therapy lived longer without their disease progressing, and they were able to take longer breaks from the drug treatments. Results of the phase II trial (EXTEND; NCT03599765) will be presented today at the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) Annual Meeting.

Adding radiation to systemic therapy extends overall survival for patients with advanced liver cancer

Adding radiation therapy to systemic therapy for patients with advanced liver cancer can extend overall survival and delay tumor progression without compromising patients’ quality of life, a randomized phase III clinical trial shows.

Lower prostate cancer screening rates associated with subsequent increase in advanced cancers

In the face of conflicting evidence over the risks and benefits of routine prostate cancer screenings, a large, longitudinal analysis found Veterans Health Administration (VA) medical centers with lower prostate screening rates had higher rates of metastatic prostate cancer cases in subsequent years than centers with higher screening rates.

AI model using daily step counts predicts unplanned hospitalizations during cancer therapy

An artificial intelligence (AI) model developed by researchers can predict the likelihood that a patient may have an unplanned hospitalization during their radiation treatments for cancer. The machine-learning model uses daily step counts as a proxy to monitor patients’ health as they go through cancer therapy, offering clinicians a real-time method to provide personalized care. Findings will be presented today at the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) Annual Meeting.

Radiation therapy for high-risk, asymptomatic bone metastases may prevent pain and prolong life

Treating high-risk, asymptomatic bone metastases with radiation may reduce painful complications and hospitalizations and possibly extend overall survival in people whose cancer has spread to multiple sites, a phase II clinical trial suggests. Results of the multicenter, randomized trial (NCT03523351) will be presented today at the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) Annual Meeting.

MD Anderson hosts Leading Edge of Cancer Research Symposium

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center will host its virtual Leading Edge of Cancer Research Symposium from November 17-18, 2022, featuring presentations and discussions on important topics in discovery and translational research that will drive the next wave of cancer breakthroughs. The event also includes a virtual poster session; interested researchers are encouraged to submit abstracts by October 24, 2022.

Radiation oncology research and clinical trial results to be featured at ASTRO’s Annual Meeting in San Antonio

The American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) announced today the 10 studies that will be highlighted in the 2022 ASTRO Annual Meeting press program. Researchers will discuss their findings in two news briefings to be held October 24 and 25 in the Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center in San Antonio and via live webcast. Reporters can register for the meeting at astro.org/annualmeetingpress.

Machine learning creates opportunity for new personalized therapies

Researchers at the University of Michigan Rogel Cancer Center have developed a computational platform that can predict new and specific metabolic targets in ovarian cancer, suggesting opportunities to develop personalized therapies for patients that are informed by the genetic makeup of their tumors. The study appeared in Nature Metabolism.

$1.8 Million NIH Grant Supports Head and Neck Cancer Research

Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers Lluis Morey, Ph.D., and Ramiro Verdun, Ph.D., have received a $1.8 million NIH R01 grant to study the epigenetic mechanisms that drive head and neck cancers.

Cancer Expert Shares Troubling Research on World Trade Center Exposure

Police officers and construction workers who responded on September 11, 2001, to the World Trade Center disaster in New York City and worked in its aftermath had at least twice the risk of developing the precursor for multiple myeloma compared…

WORLD-RENOWNED CANCER EXPERT SHARES TROUBLING RESEARCH ON WORLD TRADE CENTER EXPOSURE

Miami, Fla. – September 11, 2001, changed America, and today we are learning more about the long-term health impacts of unprecedented environmental exposure to carcinogens at the World Trade Center disaster site.  New research suggests that emergency response and recovery…

Department of Energy Announces $14.8 Million for Particle Accelerators for Science & Society

Today, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced $14.8 million in funding for advanced research projects in particle accelerator science and technology. Particle accelerators provide unique sources of light and particles that support the research of thousands of scientists worldwide, play a direct role in the production of more than $500 billion of goods annually, and treat more than 5 million cancer patients each year.

Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Announces Biomedical Laureates to Address Health Disparities in Environmental Health, Cancer, and Emergency Medicine

The Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai announced today the appointment of three new Laureates as part of its Biomedical Laureates Program, furthering its institutional commitment to broadening diversity and mentorship opportunities.

Sexual dysfunction high among women with lung cancer

Sexual dysfunction is highly prevalent in women with lung cancer with most survey participants reporting little to no interest in sexual activity, according to research led by Narjust Florez (Duma), MD, associate director for the Cancer Care Equity Program at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. The research was presented today at the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC) World Conference on Lung Cancer 2022.

Binghamton University, Upstate Medical agree to closer collaborations

A new agreement between Upstate Medical University and Binghamton University’s Thomas J. Watson College of Engineering and Applied Science will strengthen ties between the two schools and encourage closer research collaborations.

Study Shows Older Age and Smoking Most Important Risk Factors for Developing Any Cancer

A new large study led by researchers at the American Cancer Society shows older age and smoking are the two most important risk factors associated with a relative and absolute five-year risk of developing any cancer. The findings also demonstrate that in addition to age and smoking history, clinicians should consider excess body fatness, family history of any cancer, and several other factors that may help patients determine if they may benefit from enhanced cancer screening or prevention interventions. The data was published today in the journal Cancer.

Jianhua Zhao awarded $2.4M to reveal cancer targets through atomic-resolution imaging

Assistant Professor Jianhua Zhao, Ph.D., has been awarded a unique and competitive grant from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The five-year, $2.4 million grant aims to give researchers greater research flexibility to work on fundamental questions in biology.

New link found that connects cell signaling pathway to development of esophageal cancers, Barrett’s syndrome

A team of researchers at the Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and Case Comprehensive Cancer Center believe they have identified a cell signaling pathway responsible for the development of esophageal adenocarcinomas, an aggressive form of esophageal cancer that has gradually become more common, even in younger people.

MD Anderson Research Highlights for July 13, 2022

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center’s Research Highlights provides a glimpse into recent basic, translational and clinical cancer research from MD Anderson experts. Current advances include new targets involved in protecting DNA replication forks and preventing inflammatory responses, a new treatment option for elderly patients with late-stage acute myeloid leukemia, insights into the breast cancer tumor microenvironment, biomarkers of response to targeted and immune therapies, a novel cellular therapy option for osteosarcoma and a new target for inducing ferroptosis in cancer cells.

Sylvester Plays Pivotal Role in Practice-Changing Anal Cancer Prevention Study Published by NEJM

The New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) has published the results of a study by Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of Miami Miller School and other investigators on anal cancer prevention in people living with HIV (PLHIV) that will likely establish a…

Unexpected link between most common cancer drivers may yield more effective drugs

Two of the most common genetic changes that cause cells to become cancerous, which were previously thought to be separate and regulated by different cellular signals, are working in concert, according to new research from the University of Wisconsin–Madison. To date, researchers have focused on finding drugs that block one or the other to treat cancer.

Department of Energy Awards 18 Million Node-Hours of Computing Time to Support Cutting-Edge Research

Today, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced that 18 million node-hours have been awarded to 45 scientific projects under the Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) Leadership Computing Challenge (ALCC) program. The projects, with applications ranging from advanced energy systems to climate change to cancer research, will use DOE supercomputers to uncover unique insights about scientific problems that would otherwise be impossible to solve using experimental approaches.

MD Anderson Research Highlights for June 29, 2022

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center’s Research Highlights provides a glimpse into recent basic, translational and clinical cancer research from MD Anderson experts. Current advances include a lower-intensity therapy for acute myeloid leukemia, a new target for treating chronic myelomonocytic leukemia, real-world synthetic controls for clinical trials in rare cancers, a potential biomarker to predict endocrine therapy response in breast cancer, integrated CRISPR screens to identify novel tumor suppressors, and a deeper knowledge of the immune tumor microenvironment in melanoma-derived brain metastases.