Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center Announces New Early-Career Physician Research Program in Cancer Science

Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSK) today announced a $25 million gift from Louis V. Gerstner, Jr. to create the Louis V. Gerstner, Jr. Physician Scholars Program. Designed to support the innovative research of physician-scientists who are early in their career at MSK, the Gerstner Physician Scholars Program will advance promising scientific research and further the careers of outstanding junior faculty.

‘Research autopsy’ helps scientists study why certain cancer therapies stop working

A new research study at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center – Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute (OSUCCC – James) turns cancer scientists into molecular detectives, searching for clues for why certain cancers are able to spread and evolve by studying tissues collected within hours of death.

Are Too Many Phase III Cancer Clinical Trials Set Up to Fail?

New research in JNCCN finds four out of five cancer therapies tested in Phase III trials do not achieve clinically-meaningful benefit in prolonging survival, and is the first study to quantify the number of false-positive, false-negative, and true-negative trial results.

Coriell Institute for Medical Research, Van Andel Institute Awarded Estimated $12.4 Million SPORE Grant from National Cancer Institute

The Coriell Institute for Medical Research and Van Andel Institute (VAI) have been awarded a prestigious Specialized Programs of Research Excellence (or SPORE) grant from the National Cancer Institute (award P50CA254897). The five-year grant valued at an estimated $12.4 million will support nearly 20 scientists as they work to improve epigenetic therapies for cancer. The project is co-led by Coriell’s President and CEO Jean-Pierre Issa, MD, Van Andel Institute’s Chief Scientific Officer Peter A. Jones, PhD, DSc (hon), and Johns Hopkins University and VAI’s Stephen Baylin, MD.

Johns Hopkins Cancer Researcher Ashani Weeraratna Appointed To National Cancer Advisory Board By President Biden

Johns Hopkins scientist Ashani Weeraratna, PhD, a leading cancer researcher who specializes in melanoma and the effects of aging on cancer, has been appointed by President Joe Biden to serve as a member of the National Cancer Advisory Board.

How a plant virus could protect and save your lungs from metastatic cancer

Using a virus that grows in black-eyed pea plants, researchers developed a new therapy that could keep metastatic cancers from spreading to the lungs, as well as treat established tumors in the lungs.

Researchers identify a mechanism that can help guide the development of new STING-activating drugs using imaging

A new study from scientists at the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center found that emerging drugs that activate the protein STING, a well-established regulator of immune cell activation, substantially alter the activity of metabolic pathways responsible for generating the nucleotide building blocks for DNA.

UK HealthCare Launches Pediatric Neuroendocrine Tumor Program

UK HealthCare recently launched a new Pediatric Neuroendocrine Tumor Clinical and Research Program to improve treatment for children diagnosed with or at high risk for developing rare neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). This program is a joint effort between the University of Kentucky Markey Cancer Center and the Kentucky Children’s Hospital and is one of only a handful of centers specializing in this field in the world.

UCLA researchers awarded $1M from DOD to advance CAR T cell therapy for rare melanomas

Scientists Dr. Cristina Puig-Saus and Dr. Daniel Shin from the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center have received a $1 million Translational Research Award from the U.S. Department of Defense Melanoma Research Program to help advance the use of chimeric antigen receptor, or CAR, T cell therapy as a treatment for people with acral, mucosal and uveal melanomas.

Mount Sinai Receives NCI Grant to Study Anal Cancer Screening in High-Risk Women

The Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai has been awarded a grant of more than $4 million by the National Cancer Institute for a large-scale study to evaluate anal cancer screening in high-risk women who have been previously diagnosed with human papillomavirus (HPV) infection.

Graphic Warning Labels on Cigarette Packaging Changes Perceptions

A Herbert Wertheim School of Public Health and Human Longevity Science at University of California San Diego clinical trial showed that graphic warning labels on cigarette packaging changes perceptions of smokers to recognize the negative consequences of tobacco and consider quitting.

New discoveries reveal how acute myeloid leukemia walks a fine line between growth and cell death

Researchers revealed new insights into how acute myeloid leukemia (AML) develops and progresses, according to a study published in Molecular Cell on July 20, 2021. They describe a mechanism by which AML cells regulate a cancer-related protein, mutant IDH2, to increase the buildup of blood cancer cells—a distinguishing characteristic of the disease.

UM Greenebaum Comprehensive Cancer Center Earns Renewal of Highest Designation for Cancer Center Excellence from National Cancer Institute

The University of Maryland Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Comprehensive Cancer Center (UMGCCC) has earned renewal of its National Cancer Institute (NCI) designation as a Comprehensive Cancer Center for another five years. The prestigious distinction recognizes the cancer center’s high caliber of scientific leadership and robust programs in basic, clinical and population science research, placing it in the top echelon of cancer centers nationwide.

American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) to host in-person Annual Meeting in Chicago, October 24-27

Registration opens today for the American Society for Radiation Oncology’s (ASTRO) 63rd Annual Meeting, which will return to an in-person conference at McCormick Place West in Chicago, October 24-27, 2021. Media resources and registration are available at www.astro.org/astro2021press, and general registration is available at www.astro.org/annualmeeting.

Prominent Scientist Julio Aguirre-Ghiso, Ph.D., To Lead New Cancer Dormancy and Tumor Microenvironment Institute at Albert Einstein Cancer Center

Albert Einstein Cancer Center (AECC), Albert Einstein College of Medicine, and Montefiore Health System today announced that leading cancer biologist Julio Aguirre-Ghiso, Ph.D., has been named founding director of the Cancer Dormancy and Tumor Microenvironment Institute (CDTMI), director of the Gruss-Lipper Biophotonics Center, and co-leader of the AECC Tumor Microenvironment and Metastasis Program. He will also be an endowed professor of cell biology at Einstein. He will assume his new roles on October 1, 2021.

Capturing the Chemistry of Light-Activated Cancer Drugs with Ruomei Gao

Ruomei Gao—an associate professor at SUNY College at Old Westbury—has been using facilities at the Center for Functional Nanomaterials at Brookhaven Lab to investigate two primary processes of photosensitization for cancer therapy and prevention.

Global Event Will Advance Early Age Onset Colorectal Cancer Research

In many countries around the world, patients under age 50 are fighting, some dying, of colon and rectal cancers. Early-Age Onset Colorectal Cancer is an urgent issue in cancer research and patient care around the globe. We all want to know why this is happening, fully aware that for some, time is running out.

Tip Sheet: Massive unmet needs in COVID-19 treatment, osteoporosis drugs for breast cancer, new bladder cancer target — and AIDS at 40

SEATTLE — June 2, 2021 — Below are summaries of recent Fred Hutch research findings and other news. If you are covering news at the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (June 4-8), check out our ASCO page highlighting Fred Hutch presentations and feel free to reach out to our media team for help sourcing experts: [email protected]

LUDWIG CANCER RESEARCH STUDY DISCOVERS HOW TO REVIVE POTENT BUT INERT ANTI-CANCER IMMUNE CELLS FOR THERAPY

A Ludwig Cancer Research study has discovered how to revive a powerful but functionally inert subset of anti-cancer immune cells that are often found within tumors for cancer therapy.

Led by Ludwig Lausanne’s Ping-Chih Ho and Li Tang of the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, the study describes how an immune factor known as interleukin-10 orchestrates the functional revival of “terminally exhausted” tumor-infiltrating T lymphocytes (TILs), which have so far proved impervious to stimulation by immunotherapies. It also demonstrates that the factor, when applied in combination with cell therapies, can eliminate tumors in mouse models of melanoma and colon cancer. The findings are reported in the current issue of Nature Immunology.

Cleveland Clinic experts available to comment on cancer research presented at ASCO Annual Meeting

Cleveland Clinic cancer researchers are involved with more than 50 studies that’ll be presented at the virtual American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting, June 4—8, 2021. Key research from Cleveland Clinic focuses on advancements in the prevention and…

SHRO’s Giordano Meets with Speaker Pelosi at Italian Embassy in Washington

At the prestigious setting of Villa Firenze, the Italian Embassy in Washington, DC, on the occasion of a farewell party for outgoing Ambassador Armando Varricchio, Professor Antonio Giordano, Neapolitan oncologist, director of the Sbarro Institute for Cancer Research, Temple University, professor of Pathological Anatomy at the University of Siena, Italy, and member of the board of directors of the National Italian American Foundation (NIAF) was in attendance among the many high-ranking government officials and honored guests.

Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey Experts Available for Comment on Research Topics during National Cancer Research Month

New Brunswick, N.J., April 29, 2021 – Many years of research devoted to cancer has led to valuable insight and life-saving measures. To highlight the importance of lifesaving research to the millions of people around the world impacted by cancer,…

Patient reactions to colorectal cancer estimated to become the leading cause of cancer-related deaths for those 20-49 by 2030

In a recent JAMA publication, researchers predict, “For the age group 20-49, colorectal cancer was estimated to become the leading cause of cancer-related deaths by 2030.” Fight Colorectal Cancer (Fight CRC), the nation’s leading advocacy organization, is committed to amplifying…

Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey Awarded $1.3M for Cancer Metabolism and Growth Research Program

Rutgers Cancer Institute has received a $1.3 million, five-year grant from the National Cancer Institute to support the Cancer Metabolism and Growth and Tumor Host Interactions Training Program which will provide postdoctoral candidates the highest quality training and research experience.

Tip Sheet: New COVID-19 transmission study, returning to school, video of biorepositories — and a new weight loss study

SEATTLE —  April 2, 2021 — Below are summaries of recent Fred Hutch research findings and other news. April is National Minority Health Month, with a focus on the disproportionate impacts of COVID-19 on communities of color. See more details below on related Fred Hutch programming.Save the date for our monthly public science event, “Science Says” on Tuesday, April 27.

Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey Research Leader Elected as a Fellow to the American Association for Cancer Research Academy

Deputy director, chief scientific officer, and associate director for Basic Research at Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey has been elected to the 2021 class of Fellows of the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Academy, a prestigious accolade offered only to individuals whose work has had a significant and enduring impact on cancer research.