New Report Estimates 10,000 People 65 and Older Living with Dementia in the Nation’s Capital

A report released today estimates that about 10,000 Washington, D.C. residents 65 and older are living with dementia, a general term for a range of memory loss disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease.

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Hackensack Meridian Hackensack University Medical Center Holds Ribbon Cutting for Center for Memory Loss and Brain Health

On January 6, 2021, Hackensack Meridian Hackensack University Medical Center’s Neuroscience Institute held a ribbon-cutting for its new Center for Memory Loss and Brain Health. The center will offer integrated, high-quality screening, diagnostic and treatment services for adults living with cognitive or memory impairment caused by conditions such as various types of dementia including Alzheimer’s disease.

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Am I Losing My Sense of Smell or Is It COVID-19

Do I have COVID-19 or is it something else? Bobby Tajudeen, MD, director of rhinology, sinus surgery and skull base surgery at Rush University Medical Center explains the differences between common smell loss and smell loss as a COVID-19 symptom and when to see a specialist.

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How Caregivers of People with Dementia Can Navigate Holidays During the Pandemic

As COVID-19 cases increase across the nation, many caregivers are trying to navigate the holidays for relatives with dementia or Alzheimer’s disease. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention suggests that people not travel to limit the potential spread of the coronavirus.

Mary Catherine Lundquist, program director of Care2Caregivers, a peer counseling helpline (800-424-2494) for caregivers of people with dementia and Alzheimer’s disease operated by Rutgers Behavioral Health Care, discusses how families can stay connected with their loved ones.

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Older Adults with Dementia Exhibit Financial “Symptoms” Up To Six Years Before Diagnosis

A new study led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and the Federal Reserve Board of Governors found that Medicare beneficiaries who go on to be diagnosed with dementia are more likely to miss payments on bills as early as six years before a clinical diagnosis.

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Alzheimer’s Association should reveal financial conflict of interest in urging FDA to approve Biogen drug, says Dr. Leslie Norins, CEO of Alzheimer’s Germ Quest

Biogen tried, and failed, to win FDA committee approval for its anti-amyloid Alzheimer’s drug. The Alzheimer’s Association supported the application but did not reveal significant monies received from the firm.

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Married, Single, Kids or Not, Participating in Workforce May Protect Women’s Memory

Women who work in the paid labor force in early adulthood and middle age may have slower memory decline later in life than women who do not work for pay, according to a new study published in the November 4, 2020, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. Researchers found an association between working for pay and slower memory decline regardless of a woman’s marital or parenthood status.

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Alabama Symphony Orchestra musicians perform virtual concerts for sickest COVID-19 patients at UAB Hospital

During the COVID-19 pandemic, the sickest patients at the University of Alabama at Birmingham Hospital have had their troubles eased, however briefly, thanks to an innovative musical project. Helping those patients recover — and keeping their spirits up amid the isolation the virus requires — is the motivation for the project, an effort between UAB health care staff and the Alabama Symphony Orchestra.

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