Subjective Cognitive Decline Linked to Higher Dementia Risk for Black, Latino People

Some people report a decline in their memory before any decline is large enough to show up on standard tests. This experience, called subjective cognitive decline, is associated with an increased risk of later developing dementia in white, Black and Latino people, according to a study published in the November 30, 2022, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Review: Are Climate Change and Air Pollution Making Neurologic Diseases Worse?

People with neurologic diseases like headache, dementia, multiple sclerosis (MS) and Parkinson’s disease may experience worsening symptoms due to climate change, according to a scoping review of research published in the November 16, 2022, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Poll documents the critical role of people over 50 as caregivers and helpers for older loved ones

More than half of people over 50 say they’ve helped at least one person over 65 take care of their health, personal hygiene, home or finances in the past two years. Nearly all say they get something positive out of the experience.

Many middle-aged adults wary of taking part in studies of dementia prevention drugs

Drug companies and university-based teams are working urgently to find and test new medications that could prevent or slow the decline of brain function in older adults. But a new study suggests they’ll need to work harder to find volunteers for their clinical trials.

Spreading hope through humor — Markey Cancer patient, comedian shares her story

As a stand-up comedian, Debra Faulk is an expert at transforming the most difficult and uncomfortable moments of her life into something that lifts others. Active in the local comedy scene, the 54-year-old Lexington native uses standup as a platform to shine a light on serious health issues, with much of her routine inspired by her family’s experiences: one sister dealt with intellectual disabilities while another had breast cancer, her brother served in Desert Storm and came back with PTSD, her father had dementia, and her mother was on dialysis.

Does Traffic-Related Air Pollution Increase Risk of Dementia?

Higher exposure to a certain type of traffic-related air pollution called particulate matter may be linked to an increased risk of dementia, according to a meta-analysis published in the October 26, 2022, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. Researchers specifically looked at fine particulate matter, PM2.5, which consists of pollutant particles of less than 2.5 microns in diameter suspended in air. The meta-analysis included all available studies on air pollution and risk of dementia.

An Environmental Wake-Up Call for Neurology

The Presidential Symposium at the American Neurological Association’s 2022 Annual Meeting (ANA2022) in Chicago will shine a spotlight on the role of environmental exposures — air pollution, pesticides, microplastics, and more — in diseases like dementias and developmental disorders.

ACS awarded grant to develop resources for older adults with cognitive impairments undergoing surgery

The American College of Surgeons (ACS) is the recipient of a $100,000 grant from the Council of Medical Specialty Societies (CMSS) to develop comprehensive educational resources to improve surgical care and outcomes for older adults with Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias who are undergoing surgery.

Alzheimer’s and Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer’s Association announces UK’s Donna Wilcock as new editor-in-chief

The Alzheimer’s Association welcomes the University of Kentucky’s Donna M. Wilcock, Ph.D., as the new editor-in-chief of Alzheimer’s & Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer’s Association.Since its inception in 2005, Alzheimer’s & Dementia has sought to bridge the knowledge gaps that separate traditional fields of dementia research by rapidly disseminating new findings and acting as a forum for articles covering clinical investigations and basic, social and behavioral research.

Mount Sinai Researchers Use Artificial Intelligence to Uncover the Cellular Origins of Alzheimer’s Disease and Other Cognitive Disorders

Deep learning models represent “an entirely new paradigm for studying dementia”

FAU, Israel Scientists ‘Team Up’ to Tackle Alzheimer’s-related Mood Disorders

Researchers from Florida Atlantic University, in collaboration with Tel Aviv University, have received a two-year, $379,177 grant from the National Institute on Aging, National Institutes for Health, on a collaborative project to study mood-disorders changes in Alzheimer’s disease.

Mayo Clinic expert provides tips for reducing dementia risk

More than 55 million people worldwide are believed to be living with dementia, according to the World Health Organization. Ronald Petersen, M.D., a neurologist and director of Mayo Clinic’s Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center, says you can’t prevent dementia, but you can reduce your risk.

Study identifies new dementia risk genes through novel testing approach

A new UCLA-led study has identified multiple new risk genes for Alzheimer’s disease and a rare, related brain disorder by using a combination of new testing methods allowing for mass screening of genetic variants in a single experiment. 

UNH Awarded $2.8 Million to Develop Robots to Care for People with Alzheimer’s and Dementia

Researchers at the University of New Hampshire will receive a five-year grant totaling $2.8 million from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to develop and test social assistive robots to aid in the care of individuals with Alzheimer’s disease and related dementia in the comfort of their own homes.

JMIR Aging | Using Twitter to Examine Stigma Against People With Dementia During COVID-19

JMIR Publications recently published “Using Twitter to Examine Stigma Against People With Dementia During COVID-19: Infodemiology Study” in JMIR Aging which reported that during the pandemic, there has been significant social media attention focused on the increased COVID-19 risks and impacts for people with dementia and their care partners.

UK HealthCare, Community Leaders Celebrate Opening of New Sanders-Brown Clinic

Today (July 25), UK HealthCare and community leaders celebrated the full opening of the Sanders-Brown Memory Clinic at Turfland. The new, larger clinic replaces the former Sanders-Brown facilities along North Broadway in Lexington.

The world looks to The University of Kentucky’s Sanders-Brown Center on Aging for answers to the mysteries of dementia, and the elderly rely on them for help in charting their path to a healthy and vigorous senior lifestyle. After outgrowing their old space, leaders at UK decided it was time that Sanders-Brown’s home for clinical research and patient care reflects their reputation — building them a new home on UK HealthCare’s Turfland Campus.

Ochsner Health Receives $700K Dementia Care Grant from the National Institute on Aging and National Institutes of Health

The National Institute on Aging (NIA) and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) awarded Ochsner Health a $700,000 grant to study the effectiveness of its collaborative dementia care through the Ochsner Neuroscience Institute’s Brain Health and Cognitive Disorders Program.

Online Chair Yoga Viable Exercise for Isolated Older Adults with Dementia

Researchers evaluated a remotely supervised online chair yoga intervention targeted at older adults with dementia and measured clinical outcomes virtually via Zoom under the remote guidance. Results showed that remotely supervised online chair yoga is a feasible approach for managing physical and psychological symptoms in socially isolated older adults with dementia based on retention (70 percent) and adherence (87.5 percent), with no injury or other adverse events.

Eating More Ultra-processed Foods Associated with Increased Risk of Dementia

People who eat the highest amounts of ultra-processed foods like soft drinks, chips and cookies may have a higher risk of developing dementia than those who eat the lowest amounts, according to a new study published in the July 27, 2022, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. Researchers also found that replacing ultra-processed foods in a person’s diet with unprocessed or minimally processed foods was associated with a lower risk. The study does not prove that ultra-processed foods cause dementia. It only shows an association.

Study: Chores, Exercise, and Social Visits Linked to Lower Risk of Dementia

Physical and mental activities, such as household chores, exercise, and visiting with family and friends, may help lower the risk of dementia, according to a new study published in the July 27, 2022, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The study looked at the effects of these activities, as well as mental activities and use of electronic devices in people both with and without higher genetic risk for dementia.

Study: Liver Disease Linked to Higher Risk of Dementia

People who have non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, a buildup of fat cells in the liver, may have a higher risk of dementia, according to a new study published in the July 13, 2022, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. Researchers also found that people with this form of liver disease who also have heart disease or who have had a stroke may have an even higher risk of dementia.

Thyroid Problems Linked to Increased Risk of Dementia

Older people with hypothyroidism, also called underactive thyroid, may be at increased risk of developing dementia, according to a study published in the July 6, 2022, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The risk of developing dementia was even higher for people whose thyroid condition required thyroid hormone replacement medication.

Chula’s Innovations for the Aging Society

As one of the countries with a rapidly increasing aging population, especially this 2022, Thailand is now becoming an ‘aging’ society and will likely become a ‘super-aging society’ by 2031. To better meet the needs and provide services to the nation’s aging society, experts from various fields at Chulalongkorn University have conducted research to produce and develop innovations for the elderly.

Recent Study Indicates High Prevalence of Recently Defined Non-Alzheimer’s Dementia

Researchers from the University of Kentucky’s Sanders-Brown Center on Aging say a paper recently published in Acta Neuropathologica is the most definitive assessment yet of the prevalence of a form of dementia classified in 2019 and now known as LATE. The results show that the prevalence of brain changes from LATE may be roughly 40% in older adults and as high as 50% in people with Alzheimer’s disease.