Could a Novel Light Therapy Help People With Alzheimers?

Recently, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) awarded researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai a five-year grant to out whether exposing patients to a combination of light therapies will slow Alzheimer’s debilitating effects.

As dementia’s toll on the U.S. rises, new study shows major gaps in who gets care that could help them remain at home

A new study provides stark statistics about a reality that 6 million Americans with dementia and their families live every day: one where people with dementia receive unpaid care from spouses and adult children, and where some rely on paid help. The study finds major disparities in potential family caregiver availability, and the chance that a person with dementia will move to a nursing home.

Mayo Clinic Conference on Brain Health and Dementia to welcome people living with dementia, caregivers and health care providers

The inaugural Mayo Clinic Conference on Brain Health and Dementia will be held virtually on Oct. 29 from 9:15 a.m. to 2:15 p.m. CDT with an optional workshop to follow. The event is a collaboration among Mayo Clinic, AARP and the Alzheimer’s Association.

NeuroVision Imaging Inc. Announces Additional Funding From the ADDF to Accelerate Development of Novel Blood-Based Lab Test to Predict Dementia Before Clinical Onset

NeuroVision Imaging Inc. has received an additional investment from the Alzheimer’s Drug Discovery Foundation to hasten development of a novel blood-based lab test to provide detection and measurement of biomarkers for Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias before clinical onset.

Add It Up: Could This Test Equal a Way to Determine Dementia Risk?

People whose scores on a dementia risk test indicated a less brain-healthy lifestyle, including smoking, high blood pressure and a poor diet, may also have the following: lower scores on thinking skills tests, more changes on brain scans and a higher risk of cognitive impairment. That’s according to a new study published in the August 25, 2021, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The study also found that in men, the test scores were associated with poor memory function and markers of brain shrinkage.

Hopkins Med News Update

NEWS STORIES IN THIS ISSUE:

-Study: Race and Ethnicity May Impact Prevalence and Treatment of Heart Valve Dysfunction
-Johns Hopkins Medicine Suggests Eliminating Nerve Cell Protein May Stop ALS, Dementia
-Researchers Tell Doctors to Avoid Routine Urinary Tests for Older Patients with Delirium
-Johns Hopkins Medicine Researchers Show How Air Pollution May Cause Chronic Sinusitis
-Researchers ID Location on Brain Protein Linked to Parkinson’s Disease Development
-COVID-19 News: The Return of Onsite Schooling — and How to Keep Your Kids Safe from COVID

UNLV Alzheimer’s Researcher and Expert Panel Present First-Use Recommendations For Aducanumab

A group of six leading Alzheimer’s experts has convened to make the first recommendations for the appropriate use of aducanumab (Aduhelm, Biogen/Eisai), a newly approved treatment for early Alzheimer’s disease. The recommendations will help provide clinicians with greater clarity and…

Think About This: Keeping Your Brain Active May Delay Alzheimer’s Dementia 5 Years

Keeping your brain active in old age has always been a smart idea, but a new study suggests that reading, writing letters and playing card games or puzzles in later life may delay the onset of Alzheimer’s dementia by up to five years. The research is published in the July 14, 2021, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

AAN Issues Ethical Guidance for Dementia Diagnosis and Care

The American Academy of Neurology (AAN), the world’s largest association of neurologists with more than 36,000 members, is issuing ethical guidance for neurologists and neuroscience professionals who care for people with Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias. The new position statement is published in the July 12, 2021 online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. This update to the 1996 AAN position statement was developed by the Ethics, Law, and Humanities Committee, a joint committee of the American Academy of Neurology, American Neurological Association and Child Neurology Society.

Self-reported declines in cognition may be linked to changes in brain connectivity

A team from Wayne State University recently published the results of a three-year study of cognitive changes in older adults who complained that their cognitive ability was worsening though clinical assessments showed no impairments. MRIs at 18-month intervals showed significant changes in functional connectivity in two areas of the brain.

UCI-led meta-analysis identifies hypertension medications that help ward off memory loss

Irvine, Calif., June  21, 2021 — A large-scale meta-analysis led by University of California, Irvine researchers provides the strongest evidence yet of which blood pressure medications help slow memory loss in older adults: those that can travel out of blood vessels and directly into the brain. The findings, published in the American Heart Association journal Hypertension, will be of interest to the 91 million Americans whose blood pressure is high enough to warrant medication, as well as the doctors who treat them.

Memory Biomarkers Confirm Aerobic Exercise Helps Cognitive Function in Older Adults

Until now, systemic biomarkers to measure exercise effects on brain function and that link to relevant metabolic responses were lacking. A study shows a memory biomarker, myokine Cathepsin B (CTSB), increased in older adults following a 26-week structured aerobic exercise training. The positive association between CTSB and cognition, and the substantial modulation of lipid metabolites implicated in dementia, support the beneficial effects of exercise training on brain function and brain health in asymptomatic individuals at risk for Alzheimer’s.

Personalized Soundscape Could Help People with Dementia with Time, Place Recognition

Designing a soundscape to improve quality of life for an individual is centered on putting their perception at the heart of the process. During the 180th ASA Meeting, Arezoo Talebzadeh from Ghent University will show how a personalized soundscape can help those with dementia by providing clues regarding time of day and place. The session, “Soundscape design for people with dementia; the correlation between psychoacoustic parameter and human perception,” will take place Wednesday, June 9.

FAU’s Ruth Tappen Named ‘2021 Alliance World Class Faculty’ Honoree

Ruth M. Tappen, Ed.D., RN, FAAN, the Christine E. Lynn Eminent Scholar and professor in FAU’s Christine E. Lynn College of Nursing, is nationally and internationally renowned as an innovative researcher and scholar. Tappen was recently recognized as the “2021 Alliance World Class Faculty” honoree by the Greater Fort Lauderdale Alliance.

New research may offer hope for Alzheimer’s patients

University of Kentucky Neuroscience Professor Greg Gerhardt’s new research program will provide answers to long-standing questions about the role of neurotransmitters GABA and glutamate in the progression of Alzheimer’s disease. A culmination of his nearly 40 years of brain research, Gerhardt’s study could help to develop new treatments for the disease.

Blood Sugar Highs and Lows Linked to Greater Dementia Risk in Type 1 Diabetes

Older people with type 1 diabetes who have been to the hospital at some point for both low and high blood sugar levels may be at six times greater risk for developing dementia years later. The research is published in the June 2, 2021, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The study also found that people with type 1 diabetes who visit the hospital for just one of the blood sugar extremes may also be at greater risk for developing dementia.

Rush Researchers Develop New Measure of Brain Health

A new measure of brain health developed by researchers at Rush University Medical Center may offer a novel approach to identifying individuals at risk of memory and thinking problems, according to research results published in Alzheimer’s & Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer’s Association on June 1.

CHOP Researchers Find Supplement Prevents Strokes in Patients with Rare Genetic Disorder

Researchers have discovered that a widely used nutritional supplement may significantly reduce the risk of fatal strokes caused by a rare genetic disorder. Additionally, the findings suggest that the supplement could be used to both block precipitation of and break up the formation of amyloid plaque deposits, a common feature found in serious forms of dementia.

Could leak in blood-brain barrier cause poor memory?

One of the keys to having a healthy brain at any age is having a healthy blood-brain barrier, a complex interface of blood vessels that run through the brain. Research shows the blood-brain barrier leaks as we age, and we lose cells called pericytes. But could this leak and the difficulties in recall be the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease?

New study provides insights into architecture of abnormal protein deposits in brain disorders

Scientists at the Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine have determined the structure of protein “fibrils” linked to Lou Gehrig’s disease and other neurodegenerative disorders—findings that provide clues to how toxic proteins clump and spread between nerve cells in the brain.