Research News Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins Medicine

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Johns Hopkins Medicine Media Relations is focused on disseminating current, accurate and useful information to the public via the media. As part of that effort, we are distributing our “COVID-19 Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins” every other Wednesday.

Microbes in dental plaque look more like relatives in soil than those on the tongue

A new study out of UChicago and the Marine Biological Laboratory used state-of-the-art sequencing technology to deep-screen the genomes of microbes known as TM7 present in the mouth. This approach determined that TM7 species living on the tongue more closely resembled those found in the GI tract, while TM7 species in dental plaque more closely resembled environmental species, providing a hint at how plaque may have played a role in microbial colonization of the body.

Could This Plaque Identifying Toothpaste Prevent a Heart Attack or Stroke?

For decades, researchers have suggested a link between oral health and inflammatory diseases affecting the entire body – in particular, heart attacks and strokes. Results of a randomized pilot trial of Plaque HD®, the first toothpaste that identifies plaque so that it can be removed with directed brushing, showed that it produced a statistically significant reduction in C-reactive protein, a sensitive marker for future risks of heart attacks and strokes, among those with elevations at baseline.