Shrinking Waveforms on Electrocardiograms Predict Worsening Health and Death of Hospitalized COVID-19 and Influenza Patients

Spotting changes in the heart’s electrical activity may prompt more-aggressive treatment and monitoring.

Heart rhythm disorders: Mayo Clinic Healthcare expert shares 5 things it’s important to know

World Heart Day is Sept. 29 – Heart rhythm disorders are one of the most common cardiac problems. Arrhythmias cause the heart to beat too fast, too slow, or irregularly. People can be born with them or develop them during their lives.

Study Shows Use of Smartphone App Associated with Lower Hospital Readmission Rates for Heart Attack Survivors

Data collected from a group of 200 heart attack survivors using a smartphone app designed to navigate the recovery process, such as medication management and lifestyle changes, showed that app users experienced hospital readmission within the first 30 days of discharge at half the rate of a comparable group given standard aftercare without the app.

CRF Announces TCT 2021 Late-Breaking Trials and Science

The Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF) has announced 22 late-breaking trial and science presentations that will be reported at TCT 2021. TCT is the annual scientific symposium of CRF and the world’s premier educational meeting specializing in interventional cardiovascular medicine. It will take place November 4-6, 2021 in Orlando, Florida at the Orange County Convention Center and simultaneously broadcast live.

UT Southwestern Among Top 25 in Nation in Eight Specialties Ranked By U.S. News ‘Best Hospitals’

UT Southwesternonce again is ranked the No. 1 hospital in Dallas-Fort Worth – the nation’s fourth-largest metro area – among 132 regional hospitals and second in Texas among 566 hospitals for the fifth consecutive year. The recognition comes several months after UT Southwestern completed expansion of its William P. Clements Jr. University Hospital.

MedStar Washington Hospital Center Again Named Among Nation’s Best Hospitals for Heart Care

MedStar Washington Hospital Center has been named among the nation’s top heart hospitals by U.S. News and World Report. Its Cardiology and Heart Surgery program climbed to #30, up seven from last year’s “Best Hospitals” rankings. It is the only nationally recognized heart program of its kind in the Washington region.

Rush University Medical Center Again on U.S. News & World Report Honor Roll

Of the more than 3,000 U.S. hospitals evaluated, Rush University Medical Center ranked No. 19 in the nation by U.S. News & World Report, with nine of specialties rated among the country’s very best.

Bidirectional impact of cardiovascular disease, cancer in Blacks focus of new AHA center

Cardiovascular disease and cancer, the nation’s top two killers, share common ground like obesity and chronic inflammation, as well as a disproportionate impact on Black Americans. A new American Heart Association-funded center at the Medical College of Georgia is working…

New theory suggests blood immune and clotting components could contribute to psychosis

A scientific review has found evidence that a disruption in blood clotting and the first line immune system could be contributing factors in the development of psychosis. The article, a joint collaborative effort by researchers at RCSI University of Medicine…

New spray could someday help heal damage after a heart attack

Heart attack, or myocardial infarction, is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. Although modern surgical techniques, diagnostics and medications have greatly improved early survival from these events, many patients struggle with the long-term effects of permanently damaged tissue,…

Imaging Test May Predict Patients Most at Risk of Some Heart Complications from COVID-19

Researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine have shown that a type of echocardiogram, a common test to evaluate whether a person’s heart is pumping properly, may be useful in predicting which patients with COVID-19 are most at risk of developing atrial fibrillation — an irregular heartbeat that can increase a person’s risk for heart failure and stroke, among other heart issues. The new findings, published online May 30 in the Journal of the American Society of Echocardiography, also suggest that patients with COVID-19 who go on to develop atrial fibrillation more commonly have elevated levels of heart-related proteins called troponin and NT-proBNP in blood test samples.