Experimental Biology 2021 Press Materials Available Now

Embargoed press materials are now available for the virtual Experimental Biology (EB) 2021 meeting, featuring cutting-edge multidisciplinary research from across the life sciences. EB 2021, to be held April 27–30, is the annual meeting of five scientific societies bringing together thousands of scientists and 25 guest societies in one interdisciplinary community.

Read more

Once-A-Week Insulin Treatment Could Be Game-Changing For Patients With Diabetes

DALLAS – April 19, 2021 – Treating people with Type 2 diabetes with a new once-a-week injectable insulin therapy proved to be safe and as effective as daily insulin injections, according to the results of two international clinical trials published online today in Diabetes Care. The studies suggest that the once-weekly treatment could provide a convenient alternative to the burden of daily insulin shots for diabetes patients.

Read more

Genetic Ancestry Versus Race Can Provide Specific, Targeted Insights to Predict and Treat Many Diseases

The complex patterns of genetic ancestry uncovered from genomic data in health care systems can provide valuable insights into both genetic and environmental factors underlying many common and rare diseases, according to a team of Mount Sinai researchers.

Read more

Racial, Gender and Socioeconomic Factors Linked to Likelihood of Getting Proven Treatment for Diabetes

A new study from researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania found significant disparities in the use of sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors, a class of drugs proven to treat type 2 diabetes, with usage remaining low with Black, Asian, and lower-income groups despite an increase in overall usage for patients with type 2 diabetes.

Read more

Pain receptors linked to the generation of energy-burning fat cells: implications for obesity therapy

A new source of energy expending brown fat cells has been uncovered by researchers at the Joslin Diabetes Center, which they say points towards potential new therapeutic options for obesity. According to the new report, published in Nature Metabolism >on 12 March 2021, the key lies in the expression of a receptor called Trpv1 (temperature-sensitive ion channel transient receptor potential cation subfamily V member 1) — a protein known to sense noxious stimuli, including pain and temperature.

Read more

Johns Hopkins Medicine Expert Creates Comprehensive Guide to New Diabetes Drugs

New medicines for people who have diabetes seem to pop up all the time. Drugs that help the body break down carbohydrates, drugs that increase excretion of glucose in the urine, drugs that help muscles respond to insulin and drugs that stimulate the pancreas to produce it — the list of pharmaceutical options to treat diabetes gets longer and longer.

Read more

Liver Cancer Tumors Appear to Be Resistant to Immunotherapy in Patients With Underlying Non-alcoholic Steatohepatitis (NASH)

Immunotherapy is not only significantly less effective in liver cancer patients who previously had a liver disease called non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), but actually appears to fuel tumor growth, according to a Mount Sinai study published in Nature in March. NASH affects as many as 40 million people worldwide and is associated with obesity and diabetes.

Read more

High readmission rate found for adults with type 1 diabetes hospitalized for diabetic ketoacidosis

One in five adults with type 1 diabetes who require in-hospital treatment of the life-threatening condition diabetic ketoacidosis has an unplanned repeat hospital visit within a month and is twice as likely to die during the second hospitalization, a new study finds. The results, which will be presented at ENDO 2021, the Endocrine Society’s annual meeting, also identified several factors that increased the readmission risk for these patients.

Read more

Genetic evidence suggests men can develop PCOS-like condition

New genetic research suggests men can develop characteristics of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS)—a common metabolic and reproductive disorder that affects women. The study was presented virtually at ENDO 2021, the Endocrine Society’s annual meeting.

Read more

Tubeless automated insulin delivery system improves blood glucose outcomes

People with type 1 diabetes can improve their blood sugar control while reducing time with low blood sugar, or hypoglycemia, using Insulet Corporation’s Omnipod 5 Automated Insulin Delivery System compared to their standard insulin therapy. Results from an industry-sponsored study of the latest Omnipod, the first tubeless, wearable insulin pump, will be presented at ENDO 2021, the Endocrine Society’s annual meeting.

Read more

Children, teens with type 1 diabetes had better glucose control during COVID-19 lockdown

Blood glucose levels improved among children and teens with type 1 diabetes during the first 12 weeks of COVID-19 lockdown in the United Kingdom, according to a study presented virtually at ENDO 2021, the Endocrine Society’s annual meeting.

Read more

Exploring Amino Acids Signaling as Intervention for Diabetes and Pancreatic Cancers

Researchers from Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey previously identified a small protein called Rab1A that regulates amino acid signaling. In a recent study, researchers explored the physiological role of Rab1A in mammals using mice though a technique in which one of an organism’s genes is made inoperative, known as genetic knockout.

Read more

Intensive Lifestyle Intervention Is Beneficial for Most People with Type 2 Diabetes, But Not All

For people who are overweight or obese and have type 2 diabetes, the first line of treatment is usually lifestyle intervention, including weight loss and increased physical activity. While this approach has cardiovascular benefit for many, it can be detrimental for people who have poor blood sugar control, according to a study conducted by researchers at Wake Forest School of Medicine.

Read more

University Hospitals Portage Medical Center Opens Food for Life Market

University Hospitals (UH) Portage Medical Center is opening a UH Food for Life Market to set patients up for success in nutrition and dietary education. The UH Food for Life Market is part of a holistic approach to addressing food insecurity and the medical conditions, including chronic health conditions, that are impacted by nutrition and access to healthy food.

Read more

CRF Offers Free Online Seminar to Help People Jump-Start their Heart Health During Heart Month

The Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF) will hold a free online seminar, The Big Three: High Blood Pressure, High Cholesterol, and Diabetes, at 12:00 PM ET on February 22, 2021 hosted by Drs. Nisha Jhalani and Sonia Tolani, cardiologists from NewYork-Presbyterian/Columbia University Irving Medical Center. The seminar is part of a series of “Mini Med Schools” conducted by the CRF Women’s Heart Health Initiative (WHHI), which empowers women with everyday tools they can use to defy heart disease.

Read more

Exercise during Pregnancy Protects Kids’ Future Health from Parents’ Obesity

New research in mice suggests that exercising during pregnancy may help prevent children—especially boys—from developing health problems related to their parents’ obesity. The study is published ahead of print in the Journal of Applied Physiology. It was chosen as an APSselect article for February.

Read more

What happens in the mouth … doesn’t stay in the mouth

The healthy human oral microbiome consists of not just clean teeth and firm gums, but also bacteria living in an environment where they constantly communicate with the immune system. A growing body of evidence has shown that this system is highly influential on, and influenced by, our overall health.

Read more

Research News Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins Medicine

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Johns Hopkins Medicine Media Relations is focused on disseminating current, accurate and useful information to the public via the media. As part of that effort, we are distributing our “COVID-19 Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins” every other Tuesday.

Read more

University Hospitals Richmond Medical Center Physician Brings New Wound Healing Technology to Ohio

University Hospitals (UH) Richmond Medical Center is the first clinical setting in Ohio to utilize a special technology that sends acoustic sound waves to wounds to jump start the healing process. Windy Cole, DPM, Certified Wound Specialist Physician at the Center for Wound Care at UH Richmond Medical Center, is leading the use of the novel device in the state through research and case studies.

The dermaPACE® System from SANUWAVE, is an FDA approved device indicated for treatment of diabetic foot ulcers. The device delivers acoustic shock waves to tissues, helping to jump start wound healing through new blood vessel formation.

Read more

Nicotine Worsens Renal Disease in Smokers with Diabetes, Damages Kidney Filters

New research suggests the toxic effects of nicotine on the kidneys’ filtering function are partly responsible for the progression of diabetes-related kidney disease in people who smoke. The study is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology-Renal Physiology.

Read more

The Association of Diabetes Care & Education Specialists announces Kellie Rodriguez as 2021 president

Kellie Rodriguez, RN, MSN, MBA, CDCES, was officially recognized today at the meeting of the Association of Diabetes Care & Education Specialists (ADCES) board of directors as the 2021 president. Rodriguez brings 23 years of experience in diabetes care and education, with a background in hospital and community-based care both in the U.S. and in her native country of Australia.

Read more

AI algorithms detect diabetic eye disease inconsistently

Diabetes continues to be the leading cause of new cases of blindness among adults in the United States. But the current shortage of eye-care providers would make it impossible to keep up with demand to provide the requisite annual screenings for this population. A new study looks at the effectiveness of seven artificial intelligence-based screening algorithms to diagnose diabetic retinopathy, the most common diabetic eye disease leading to vision loss.

Read more

UC-MSC infusion helps repair COVID-19 damage in severe cases

Dr. Camilo Ricordi, director of the Diabetes Research Institute (DRI) and Cell Transplant Center at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, and his team of international collaborators are reporting the results of a groundbreaking randomized controlled trial showing umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cell (UC-MSC) infusions safely reduce risk of death and quicken time to recovery for the most severe COVID-19 patients.

Read more

Routine eye scans may give clues to cognitive decline in diabetes

In older people with type 1 diabetes, damage to the retina may be linked to memory problems and other cognitive conditions.BOSTON – (December 31, 2020) – As they age, people with diabetes are more likely to develop Alzheimer’s disease and other cognitive disorders than are people without diabetes. Scientists at Joslin Diabetes Center now have shown that routine eye imaging can identify changes in the retina that may be associated with cognitive disorders in older people with type 1 diabetes.

Read more