Single discrimination events alter college students’ daily behavior

UW researchers aimed to understand both the prevalence of discrimination events and how these events affect college students in their daily lives. Over the course of two academic quarters, the team compared students’ self-reports of unfair treatment to passively tracked changes in daily activities, such as hours slept, steps taken or time spent on the phone.

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Chronic insomnia can be cured in cancer survivors with a basic, one-session sleep education class, study finds

In a study published online today by the journal Cancer, investigators at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute report that a single-session sleep education program for survivors can cure insomnia in many participants, and that those who don’t benefit from this approach are often helped by a more extensive, but still modest, three-session program.

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Sleep-tracking apps may contribute to insomnia

As students get ready to go back to school, some may think that using sleep-tracking apps will give them insight into whether they’ve had a good night’s rest. But sleep experts say obsessing over their monitor results can keep people awake and anxious. Most of these apps have not been clinically validated and track only movement during sleep.

Downloadable soundbites with Dr. Vishesh Kapur, co-medical director of the UW Medicine Sleep Center, are available for news outlets.

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Drugs commonly taken to improve cognition only boost short-term focus – at high cost

Irvine, Calif., Aug. 8, 2019 –The use of prescription stimulants by those without medically diagnosed conditions marks a growing trend among young adults – particularly college students seeking a brain boost. But according to a study led by the University of California, Irvine, taking a nonprescribed psychostimulant may slightly improve a person’s short-term focus but impede sleep and mental functions that rely on it – such as working memory.

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