Seizure forecasting with wrist-worn devices possible for people with epilepsy, study shows

Despite medications, surgery and neurostimulation devices, many people with epilepsy continue to have seizures. The unpredictable nature of seizures is severely limiting. If seizures could be reliably forecast, people with epilepsy could alter their activities, take a fast-acting medication or turn up their neurostimulator to prevent a seizure or minimize its effects.

A new study in Scientific Reports by Mayo Clinic researchers and international collaborators found patterns could be identified in patients who wear a special wristwatch monitoring device for six to 12 months, allowing about 30 minutes of warning before a seizure occurred. This worked well most of the time for five of six patients studied.

Neurosurgery team performs groundbreaking laser hemispherectomy on child with epilepsy

For only the second time in the world, doctors at the University of Chicago Medicine Comer Children’s Hospital and the Department of Neurosurgery used a minimally invasive surgery to disconnect the right and left sides of the brain, stopping the seizures for a boy with epilepsy.

Case Western Reserve researchers identify potential new approach to better controlling epileptic seizures

Researchers from Case Western Reserve University have identified a potential new approach to better controlling epileptic seizures. Lin Mei, professor and chair of the Department of Neurosciences at the Case Western Reserve School of Medicine, who led the new study in mouse models, said the team found a new chemical reaction that could help control epileptic seizures.

Podcast – Persistent seizures: How to use the ketogenic diet for super-refractory status epilepticus

A recent paper in Neurology Clinical Practice offers practical considerations for using the ketogenic diet in patients with seizures that last more than 24 hours, a condition known as super-refractory status epilepticus. ILAE spoke with two of the authors – dietitian Neha Kaul and epileptologist Joshua Laing.

Podcast – Dieta cetogénica y estatus epiléptico súper refractario

Un artículo reciente en “Neurology Clinical Practice” ofrece consideraciones prácticas para el empleo de la dieta cetogénica en pacientes con estatus epiléptico superrefractario. La ILAE habló con dos de los autores del artículo. (Podcast en ingles; transcripcion en español.)

Can community-based interventions help to close the epilepsy treatment gap?

More than 50 million people have epilepsy; about 80% live in lower- or middle-income countries, where diagnosis and treatment can be difficult or impossible. The percentage of people with epilepsy that is not receiving treatment is known as the treatment gap; in some countries, this gap exceeds 90%.

Suspended studies and virtual lab meetings: How the COVID-19 pandemic is affecting epilepsy researchers

How was epilepsy research forced to morph during the first few months of the COVID-19 pandemic? Researchers from 11 countries shared their experiences and thoughts on the future of laboratory research, clinical trials, and in-person conferences.

Improving treatment for psychogenic seizures: “This is a group of patients that we are taking less seriously”

Journal prize winner Benjamin Tolchin tested motivational interviewing to help people with psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) start and continue psychotherapy. Often mistaken for epilepsy, these seizures cause serious problems, yet many health care professionals discount them as “not real.”

When seizures don’t stop: What’s the latest in treating status epilepticus?

When seizures last longer than about 5 minutes–a condition called status epilepticus–emergency treatment is required. About two-thirds of people respond to initial treatment with benzodiazepines, but the others need a second drug. Which drug to choose is a matter of some debate.

Post-ictal psychosis: A medical emergency for people with epilepsy

About 70% of people with epilepsy report post-seizure (post-ictal) complications, ranging from fatigue to memory issues to headache. Post-ictal psychosis while rare, is perhaps the most dramatic of these. As many as 7% of people with temporal lobe epilepsy develop PIP, which can cause suicidal behavior or interpersonal violence. The condition requires immediate attention and treatment.

Reducing the epilepsy treatment gap in Pakistan: Start small, stay flexible, never give up

In retrospect, Pakistan’s effort to reduce the treatment gap can appear painstakingly planned, like the blueprints for a shopping complex or a neighborhood. But the secret of the country’s success is not rooted in elaborate planning. Nor did it rely on generous funding or government support.

Epilepsy is a threat to public health, says international report

Worldwide, more than 50 million people are living with epilepsy. As many as 37 million are not receiving treatment, though it can cost as little as US$5 a year and eliminates seizures about two-thirds of the time. These findings and many others are published in “Epilepsy: A public health imperative”, a report produced by ILAE, the World Health Organization and the International Bureau for Epilepsy.

Epilepsy is a threat to public health, says international report

Worldwide, more than 50 million people are living with epilepsy. As many as 37 million are not receiving treatment, though it can cost as little as US$5 a year and eliminates seizures about two-thirds of the time. These findings and many others are published in “Epilepsy: A public health imperative”, a report produced by ILAE, the World Health Organization and the International Bureau for Epilepsy.