Bio-inspired hydrogel protects the heart from post-op adhesions

A hydrogel that forms a barrier to keep heart tissue from adhering to surrounding tissue after surgery was developed and successfully tested in rodents by a team of University of California San Diego researchers. The team of engineers, scientists and physicians also conducted a pilot study on porcine hearts, with promising results.

They describe their work in the June 18, 2021 issue of Nature Communications.

Perfect Match: FAU and Memorial Healthcare System Establish Research Partnership

South Florida giants in higher education and healthcare have joined forces to form an alliance that will advance clinical research and clinical trials in the region. Florida Atlantic University and Memorial Healthcare System in Broward County have formed a “Research Partnership to Advance Clinical Trials” (Research PACT), which combines their expertise and resources in clinical research, clinical trials, basic research and translational biomedical research.

Antibody screening finds COVID-19 nearly 7 times more prevalent in O.C. than thought

Irvine, Calif., Oct. 28, 2020 — Testing a representative sample of Orange County residents for a wide range of coronavirus antibodies, University of California, Irvine researchers found that 11.5 percent of them have antibodies for COVID-19, in contrast to previous estimates of less than 2 percent. Latino and low-income residents had the highest prevalence of SARS-CoV-02 antibodies with rates of 17 percent and 15 percent, respectively.

OnSight Medical Wins TCT Connect 2020 hark Tank Innovation Competition

The Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF) is pleased to announce that OnSight Medical, an AI-based company specializing in cardiac ultrasound imaging, has won the TCT 2020 Shark Tank Innovation Competition which took place during the Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT), the world’s premier educational meeting specializing in interventional cardiovascular medicine. The winner was also presented with the Jon DeHaan Foundation Award for Interventional Innovation.

UCI develops low-cost, accurate COVID-19 antibody detection platform

Irvine, Calif., Aug. 19, 2020 — A robust, low-cost imaging platform utilizing lab-on-a-chip technology created by University of California, Irvine scientists may be available for rapid coronavirus diagnostic and antibody testing throughout the nation by the end of the year. The UCI system can go a long way toward the deployment of a vaccine for COVID-19 and toward reopening the economy, as both require widespread testing for the virus and its antibodies.

SLAC scientists invent low-cost emergency ventilator and share the design for free

Researchers at the Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory have invented an emergency ventilator that could help save the lives of patients suffering from COVID-19, the disease caused by novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2.

Researchers develop low-cost, easy-to-use emergency ventilator for COVID-19 patients

A team of engineers and physicians at the University of California San Diego has developed a low-cost, easy-to-use emergency ventilator for COVID-19 patients that is built around a ventilator bag usually found in ambulances.

The team built an automated system around the bag and brought down the cost of an emergency ventilator to just $500 per unit–by comparison, state of the art ventilators currently cost at least $10,000. The device’s components can be rapidly fabricated and the ventilator can be assembled in just 15 minutes.

Next-gen nano technologies to tackle infection and diagnose disease

Next-gen nano technologies that can prevent infection and diagnose disease are set to transform the medical industry as this important UniSA research is awarded more than $2 million dollars under the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) 2021 Investigator Grants.

Engineers share designs for 3D printed ventilator adapters to help during coronavirus pandemic

Engineers at Binghamton University, State University of New York have made their designs for 3D printed ventilator adapters available to the public to help during the coronavirus pandemic.

ISPOR-FDA Summit 2020 Will Focus on the Use of Patient-Preference Information in Medical Devices

ISPOR—the professional society for health economics and outcomes research, announced that it will be holding a joint ISPOR-FDA Summit, “Using Patient-Preference Information in Medical Device Regulatory Decisions: Benefit-Risk and Beyond,” on March 31, 2020 in Silver Spring, MD, USA.

New way to make biomedical devices from silk yields better products with tunable qualities

Researchers have developed a more efficient fabrication method for silk that allows them mold the material like plastic into solid forms for a wide range of applications, including medical devices. The properties of the end products can be “tuned”, and modified with bioactive molecules, such as antibiotics and enzymes.

A Robot and Software Make it Easier to Create Advanced Materials

A Rutgers-led team of engineers has developed an automated way to produce polymers, making it much easier to create advanced materials aimed at improving human health. The innovation is a critical step in pushing the limits for researchers who want to explore large libraries of polymers, including plastics and fibers, for chemical and biological applications such as drugs and regenerative medicine through tissue engineering.