First detailed electronic study of new nickelate superconductor finds 3D metallic state

It represents an entirely new type of ground state for transition metal oxides, and opens new directions for experiments and theoretical studies of how superconductivity arises and how it can be optimized in this system and possibly in other compounds.

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Connecting the dots in the sky could shed new light on dark matter

Astrophysicists have come a step closer to understanding the origin of a faint glow of gamma rays covering the night sky. They found that this light is brighter in regions that contain a lot of matter and dimmer where matter is sparser – a correlation that could help them narrow down the properties of exotic astrophysical objects and invisible dark matter.

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A day in the life of a telescope camera assembler

The LSST camera is the biggest digital camera ever constructed for ground-based astronomy. Within the year, Hannah and her teammates will finish assembling and testing the camera and it will be shipped to its home at the summit of Cerro Pachón in Chile.

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Scientists discover how proteins form crystals that tile a microbe’s shell

Many microbes wear beautifully patterned crystalline shells. Now scientists have zoomed in on the very first step in microbial shell-building: nucleation, where squiggly proteins crystallize into sturdy building blocks. The results help explain how the shells assemble themselves so quickly.

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Six Berkeley Lab Scientists Named AAAS Fellows

Six scientists from the Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) have been named Fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS).

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Researchers home in on extremely rare nuclear process

A hypothetical nuclear process known as neutrinoless double beta decay ought to be among the least likely events in the universe. Now the international EXO-200 collaboration, which includes researchers from the Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, has determined just how unlikely it is: In a given volume of a certain xenon isotope, it would take more than 35 trillion trillion years for half of its nuclei to decay through this process – an eternity compared to the age of the universe, which is “only” 13 billion years old.

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First report of superconductivity in a nickel oxide material

Scientists at SLAC and Stanford have made the first nickel oxide material that shows clear signs of superconductivity – the ability to transmit electrical current with no loss. The first in a potential new family of unconventional superconductors, its similarity to the cuprates raises hopes that it can be made to superconduct at relatively high temperatures.

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