Quantum information science

DOE Announces $30 Million for Quantum Information Science to Tackle Emerging 21st Century Challenges

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced plans to provide $30 million for Quantum Information Science (QIS) research that helps scientists understand how nature works on an extremely small scale—100,000 times smaller than the diameter of a human hair. QIS can help our nation solve some of the most pressing and complex challenges of the 21st century, from climate change to national security.

Fermilab is partner in Quantum Science Center based at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Fermilab plays a key role in the Quantum Science Center, led by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The center unites that Oak Ridge’s powerhouse capabilities in supercomputing and materials science with Fermilab’s world-class high-energy physics instrumentation and measurement expertise and facilities. Drawing on their experience building and operating experiments in cosmology and particle physics and in quantum information science, the Fermilab team is engaging in QSC efforts to develop novel, advanced quantum technologies.

Quirky Response to Magnetism Presents Quantum Physics Mystery

The search is on to discover new states of matter, and possibly new ways of encoding, manipulating, and transporting information. One goal is to harness materials’ quantum properties for communications that go beyond what’s possible with conventional electronics. Topological insulators–materials that act mostly as insulators but carry electric current across their surface–provide some tantalizing possibilities. Scientists at Brookhaven Lab describe one such material that should be right just right for making qubits. But this material doesn’t obey the rules.

Fermilab to lead $115 million National Quantum Information Science Research Center to build revolutionary quantum computer with Rigetti Computing, Northwestern University, Ames Laboratory, NASA, INFN and additional partners

Fermilab has been selected to lead one of five national centers to bring about transformational advances in quantum information science as a part of the U.S. National Quantum Initiative. The initiative provides the new Superconducting Quantum Materials and Systems Center — based at Fermilab and comprising 20 partner institutions — $115 million over five years with the goal of building and deploying a beyond-state-of-the-art quantum computer based on superconducting technologies. The center will also develop new quantum sensors, which could lead to the discovery of the nature of dark matter and other elusive subatomic particles.

SLAC and Stanford join Q-NEXT national quantum center

Q-NEXT will bring together nearly 100 world-class researchers from three national laboratories, 10 universities and 10 leading U.S. technology companies with the single goal of developing the science and technology to control and distribute quantum information. These activities, along with a focus on rapid commercialization of new technologies, will support the emerging “quantum economy” and ensure that the U.S. remains at the forefront in this rapidly advancing field.

Brookhaven Lab to Lead Quantum Research Center

The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science has selected Brookhaven National Laboratory to lead one of five National Quantum Information Science Research Centers. Through hardware-software co-design, the center—called the Co-design Center for Quantum Advantage—will advance quantum computing.

White House Office of Technology Policy, National Science Foundation and Department of Energy Announce Over $1 Billion in Awards for Artificial Intelligence and Quantum Information Science Research Institutes

Today, the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, the National Science Foundation (NSF), and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced over $1 billion in awards for the establishment of 12 new artificial intelligence (AI) and quantum information science (QIS) research institutes nationwide.

U.S. Department of Energy unveils blueprint for the quantum internet at ‘Launch to the Future: Quantum Internet’ event

The U.S. Department of Energy unveils a report that lays out a blueprint strategy for the development of a national quantum internet, bringing the United States to the forefront of the global quantum race and ushering in a new era of communications. This report provides a pathway to ensure the development of the National Quantum Initiative Act.

CIO Amber Boehnlein Takes Computing up a Notch

Computer scientists, software developers and system administrators are coming together under one roof in the newly established Computational Sciences and Technology Division at the Department of Energy’s Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. Amber Boehnlein, Jefferson Lab’s chief information officer, has been promoted to associate director for computational sciences and technology, heading up the new division.

A joint venture at the nanoscale

Scientists at Argonne National Laboratory report fabricating and testing a superconducting nanowire device applicable to high-speed photon counting. This pivotal invention will allow nuclear physics experiments that were previously thought impossible.

Particle accelerator technology could solve one of the most vexing problems in building quantum computers

One of the most difficult problems to overcome in developing a quantum computer is finding a way to maintain the lifespan of information held in quantum bits, called qubits. Researchers at Fermilab and Argonne National Laboratory are working to determine whether devices used in particle accelerators can help solve the problem. The team will run simulations on high-performance computers that will enable them to predict the lifespan of information held within these qubits using smaller versions of these devices, taking us one step closer to the age of quantum computing.

Creating the Heart of a Quantum Computer: Developing Qubits

To use quantum computers on a large scale, we need to improve the technology at their heart – qubits. Qubits are the quantum version of conventional computers’ most basic form of information, bits. The DOE’s Office of Science is supporting research into developing the ingredients and recipes to build these challenging qubits.

Creating the Heart of a Quantum Computer

Quantum computers have the potential to solve problems that conventional computers can’t. To use quantum computers on a large scale, we need to improve the technology in qubits. The DOE’s Office of Science is supporting research into developing the ingredients and recipes to build these challenging qubits.