8 Things Argonne is Doing to Save the Earth

Stepping into their superhero gear, Argonne scientists are using science and the world’s best technology to combat some of Earth’s toughest foes, from pollution to climate change.

Do simulations represent the real world at the atomic scale?

A multidisciplinary research team has developed a strategy to validate computer simulations of oxide/water interfaces at the atomic scale using X-ray reflectivity experiments. Such interfaces are key in many energy applications.

Automatic database creation for materials discovery: Innovation from frustration

A collaboration between the University of Cambridge and Argonne has developed a unique method of generating automatic databases to support specific fields of science using AI and high-performance computing.

Solving materials problems with a quantum computer

Scientists at Argonne and the University of Chicago have developed a method paving the way to using quantum computers to simulate realistic molecules and complex materials. They tested the method on a quantum simulator and IBM quantum computer.

Theoretical breakthrough shows quantum fluids rotate by corkscrew mechanism

Scientists performed simulations of merging rotating superfluids, revealing a peculiar corkscrew-shaped mechanism that drives the fluids into rotation without the need for viscosity.

Novel insight reveals topological tangle in unexpected corner of the universe

In a recent theoretical study, scientists discovered the presence of the Hopfion topological structure in nano-sized particles of ferroelectrics — materials with promising applications in microelectronics and information technology.

Making Quantum ‘Waves’ in Ultrathin Materials

A team of researchers co-led by Berkeley Lab has observed unusually long-lived wavelike electrons called “plasmons” in a new class of electronically conducting material. Plasmons are very important for determining the optical and electronic properties of metals.