Bringing discoveries to light: X-ray science at Argonne

The Advanced Photon Source allows an intricate view of everything from proteins to nuclear fuel. With a planned upgrade, it will become even more powerful.

10 ways Argonne science is combatting COVID-19

Argonne scientists and research facilities have made a difference in the fight against COVID-19 in the year since the first gene sequence for the virus was published.

Virtual reality: ALCF’s remote interns tackle real-world computing projects

The Argonne Leadership Computing Facility’s internship program went virtual this year, providing students with an opportunity to work on real-world research projects that address issues at the forefront of scientific computing.

Building a better traffic forecasting model

Researchers from Argonne have developed a new way to accurately forecast traffic and proved that it could work using as their model the California highway system, the busiest in the United States.

Globus Moves 1 Exabyte

Globus, a leading research data management service, reached a huge milestone by breaking the exabyte barrier. While it took over 2,000 days for the service to transfer the first 200 petabytes (PB) of data, the last 200PB were moved in just 247 days. This rapidly accelerating growth is reflected by the more than 150,000 registered users who have now transferred over 120 billion files using Globus.

Argonne’s new menu of data storage software helps scientists realize findings earlier

A research team, led by Argonne, is developing a new data navigation system called Mochi that will provide scientists with a menu of data services they can rapidly combine and customize to suit the particular needs of a specific science domain.

U.S. Department of Energy’s INCITE program seeks proposals for 2021

The INCITE program is now seeking proposals for high-impact, computationally intensive research projects that require the power and scale of DOE’s leadership-class supercomputers.

Capturing 3D microstructures in real time

Argonne researchers have invented a machine-learning based algorithm for quantitatively characterizing material microstructure in three dimensions and in real time. This algorithm applies to most structural materials of interest to industry.

Preparing for exascale: Eliminating disruptions on the path to sustainable fusion energy

With the world’s most powerful path-to-exascale supercomputing resources at their disposal, William Tang and colleagues are combining computer muscle and AI to eliminate disruption of fusion reactions in the production of sustainable clean energy.

Argonne researchers to share scientific computing insights at SC19

Several Argonne researchers will attend the Supercomputing 2019 (SC19) conference to share scientific computing advances and insights with an eye toward the upcoming exascale era.

Argonne training program prepares researchers for scientific computing in the exascale era

From July 28 to Aug. 9, 73 students participated in the 2019 Argonne Training Program on Extreme-Scale Computing (ATPESC) organized by the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory and funded by DOE’s Exascale Computing Project (ECP).

AI technique does double duty spanning cosmic and subatomic scales

While high-energy physics and cosmology seem worlds apart in terms of sheer scale, physicists and cosmologists at Argonne are using similar machine learning methods to address classification problems for both subatomic particles and galaxies.

Argonne harnesses virtual power to address the most complex challenges in nuclear science

Designing a new type of nuclear reactor is a complicated endeavor requiring billions of dollars and years of development. Because of the high cost, Argonne researchers are running a broad suite of computational codes on supercomputers that offer power available at only a few sites worldwide.

Argonne harnesses virtual power to address the most complex challenges in nuclear science

Designing a new type of nuclear reactor is a complicated endeavor requiring billions of dollars and years of development. Because of the high cost, Argonne researchers are running a broad suite of computational codes on supercomputers that offer power available at only a few sites worldwide.