How Argonne is working to power a clean energy revolution

A growing global population will need energy from a range of sources. Scientists at Argonne National Laboratory have been pioneering solutions for 75 years.

Seventeen from Argonne recognized with Secretary of Energy’s Honor Awards

Six groups that included seventeen scientists from the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory were recent recipients of the DOE’s 2020 Secretary of Energy’s Honor Awards.

Scientists Recruit New Atomic Heavyweights in Targeted Fight Against Cancer

Researchers from Berkeley Lab and Los Alamos National Laboratory have developed new methods for the large-scale production, purification, and use of the radioisotope cerium-134, which could serve as a PET imaging radiotracer for a highly targeted cancer treatment known as alpha-particle therapy.

ORNL, TVA sign agreement to collaborate on advanced reactor technologies

The U.S. Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the Tennessee Valley Authority have signed a memorandum of understanding to evaluate a new generation of flexible, cost-effective advanced nuclear reactors.

Argonne leads award-winning collaboration with Kairos Power that unveils new simulation of nuclear power plants

Argonne scientists won a 2019 R&D 100 award for collaborating with Kairos Power to create software that simulates entire nuclear power plants.

Argonne harnesses virtual power to address the most complex challenges in nuclear science

Designing a new type of nuclear reactor is a complicated endeavor requiring billions of dollars and years of development. Because of the high cost, Argonne researchers are running a broad suite of computational codes on supercomputers that offer power available at only a few sites worldwide.

Argonne harnesses virtual power to address the most complex challenges in nuclear science

Designing a new type of nuclear reactor is a complicated endeavor requiring billions of dollars and years of development. Because of the high cost, Argonne researchers are running a broad suite of computational codes on supercomputers that offer power available at only a few sites worldwide.