Expert says West Coast flooding, mudslides remain threat from multiple large winter storms

As California and the west coast stare down yet another major winter storm, the threat of devastating flooding and mudslides is even more urgent. Drew Ellis, a climate science and meteorology expert at Virginia Tech, explains what causes these conditions.

GW Expert Available: I-95 Highway Collapse in Philadelphia After Tanker Truck Fire

In Philadelphia, Monday morning traffic slowed drivers who tried to find new routes around a closed section of northbound I-95, which collapsed yesterday after a tanker truck caught fire underneath the highway overpass. Authorities say it could take months to repair, impacting…

Broad Climate Change Concern in Florida Linked With Recent Extreme Weather

An increasing number of Floridians agree that human actions are causing climate change, including a record number of Florida Republicans. Virtually all respondents (90 percent) believe climate change is happening, with 65 percent attributing the causes to human actions, including 49 percent of GOP voters. Belief in and concern about human-caused climate change appears to be translating into support for policies to reduce emissions and reduce impacts. The explanation for this emerging consensus may be grounded in people’s lived experiences with weather events.

A new look at the electric vehicle supply chain as battery-powered cars hit the roads en masse

Researchers at Argonne have published a series of reports that look at how production of electric vehicles and lithium-ion batteries for cars are reshaping the transportation sector, with impacts ranging from job creation to reduction of greenhouse gas emissions.

Four major Illinois research institutions form a collaboration to improve urban forest drought resilience

Argonne, The Morton Arboretum, the University of Chicago and the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign received a grant from NOAA to assess drought resilience in the urban tree canopy.

How University of Kentucky research team is proving human hair can be used to repair bridges, buildings

Did you know recycled human hair has many industry uses? As you might expect, beauty trends have fueled growth in the global hair business. But could those clippings — the ones often found on the floor of a hair salon — help repair dilapidated bridges and buildings across Kentucky and beyond? A research team in the College of Engineering at the University of Kentucky is leading the charge to answer that very question.

Poor infrastructure in Turkey, Syria partially to blame for the high number of earthquake casualties, says expert

The earthquakes in Turkey and Syria killed over 45,000 people and decimated large areas. The shockingly high number of fatalities raises the question of whether infrastructure issues are to blame. Roberto Leon, a professor of civil and environmental engineering at Virginia Tech, said there are several reasons for the large number of collapses, leading to mass casualties: Poor enforcement of existing codes (modern codes instituted after the 1999 Izmit earthquake) Grandfathering of older, deficient structures and not requiring their retrofit (structures built before 1999) Poor construction practices (i.

ComEd report shows how science and supercomputers help utilities adapt to climate change

Shifting climates are causing utility companies to take a closer look at the current and future power needs of their customers. Northern Illinois’ ComEd and Argonne National Laboratory used science to glimpse the future.

A year in review: Argonne’s breakthroughs in 2022

Argonne researchers put their stamp on 2022 with accomplishments as varied as quantum science, wearable medical sensors, and climate change resilience and recovery.

Department of Energy Announces $35 Million to Build Research Capacity, Infrastructure, and Expertise at Institutions Historically Underrepresented in Science

Today, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced $35 million to build research capacity, infrastructure, and expertise at institutions historically underrepresented in science, including minority serving institutions (MSIs) and emerging research institutions (ERIs). FAIR will enhance research at these institutions on clean energy, climate, and additional topics spanning the Office of Science portfolio. This investment will help develop a diverse, vibrant, and excellent scientific workforce and contribute to the science innovation ecosystem.

Army strong: Research teams join forces to invent weld wire for tank, infrastructure repair

The U.S. Departments of Energy and Defense teamed up to create a series of weld filler materials that could dramatically improve high-strength steel repair in vehicles, bridges and pipelines. This novel weld wire could help revitalize America’s aging infrastructures, which in 2021 received a C- grade from the American Society of Civil Engineers.

Chicago Pile 1: A bold nuclear physics experiment with enduring impact

Enrico Fermi’s Chicago Pile 1 experiment in 1942 launched an atomic age, an unrivaled national laboratory system, fleets of submarines, cancer treatments and the unending promise of clean nuclear energy. Argonne National Laboratory builds on its legacy.

Argonne awarded $6 million to develop technologies for recycling nuclear fuel

Recycling used nuclear fuel makes the most of nuclear power’s carbon-free energy potential. Argonne has received major funding to develop technologies that may result in a sustainable fuel stock and a reduction in U.S. dependency on fossil fuels.

University of Central Florida team protects virtual solar facility to win CyberForce Competition

More than 140 U.S. college teams competed to test their cyber defense skills and protect a fictional electric vehicle manufacturer’s solar installation from simulated cyberattacks.

Collegiate students fired up to protect virtual solar facility from cyberattack

Cybersecurity professionals are in high demand. The Department of Energy tasks Argonne National Laboratory with challenging and inspiring college-age students to compete against one another to outsmart cyberattackers in a simulated threat scenario.

5 big strides from Argonne towards nuclear energy’s future

Nuclear energy is an exciting carbon-free energy source. Recent work at Argonne National Laboratory shows how nuclear energy can improve and why it is such an enticing resource in the fight against climate change.

University of Redlands vision project aided by state funding

The University of Redlands is one step closer to making its University Village project a reality after receiving $8 million in funding from the State of California.

“University Village began as a vision and has evolved into an environmentally sustainable master plan that will bring significant fiscal and economic growth, new housing, and jobs to our area,” said University of Redlands President Krista L. Newkirk.

WashU Expert: Jackson water issues result of environmental racism

The increasing demand for electric vehicles and cell phones has accelerated the need for safer energy storage after numerous instances of commercial lithium-ion batteries overheating and catching fire. Peng Bai, assistant professor of energy, environmental & chemical engineering in the McKelvey School of Engineering at Washington University in St.

Argonne researchers win four 2022 R&D 100 awards

R&D Magazine has recognized four Argonne projects with R&D 100 Awards.

Call for Abstracts – The 17th APRU Multi-Hazards Symposium 2022

The Faculty of Engineering, Chulalongkorn University, would like to cordially invite you to join the 17th APRU Multi-Hazards Symposium 2022, which will be held during November 29 – November 30, 2022 at the Mandarin Hotel Bangkok Samyan, Thailand.

NYU Tandon’s IDC Innovation Hub awarded New Master Construction Innovation Contract with NYC Department of Design and Construction

A recently registered Master Applied Construction Innovation Research Services Contract between the New York City Department of Design and Construction/Town+Gown:NYC and the Institute of Design & Construction Innovation Hub (Innovation Hub) at the NYU Tandon School of Engineering will speed progress by providing all New York City construction agencies and authorities with efficient access to applied research services for innovation in construction, engineering design, and management.

Lowering the temperature on a hot topic: a climate change primer

Earth Day presents a good opportunity to help clear up some essential questions about climate change; what it is, what is responsible and how we know it’s real.

Argonne is helping communities avoid the climate crosshairs

Scientists at Argonne are addressing the vulnerabilities of infrastructure systems through the lens of climate impacts: They are creating detailed climate maps and adapting them to infrastructure as a way for communities to protect themselves from the effects of climate change.

UNH Receives $1.8 Million Grant to Study Road Resilience to Sea Level Rise

After a summer of high heat, steady sea level rise and devastating hurricanes, coastal roads have continued to take a severe beating resulting in endless wear and tear. Because these roadways have become increasingly vulnerable, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has awarded a $1.8 million grant to researchers at the University of New Hampshire to study how and why coastal hazards like excessive flooding are causing roads to crack and crumble and find ways to protect them.

FSU expert available to comment on hurricane evacuations

By: Bill Wellock | Published: August 31, 2021 | 12:21 pm | SHARE: For many people, choosing whether to evacuate in the face of an incoming hurricane or other natural disaster is not an easy decision.Hurricanes threaten people and property, but evacuation also carries risks and costs, especially if a would-be evacuee has difficulty moving or caring for themselves without help.

FSU professor available to provide comment on infrastructure needs as Congress debates bipartisan package

By: Bill Wellock | Published: August 25, 2021 | 3:27 pm | SHARE: The federal government is debating billions of dollars of investment in infrastructure that would develop roads, bridges, public transit, high-speed internet and more.Eren Ozguven, an associate professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the FAMU-FSU College of Engineering, researches how infrastructure contributes to communities’ abilities to respond to emergencies in his role as the director of the Resilient Infrastructure and Disaster Response (RIDER) Center.

Climate experts share insights in new report from Argonne’s America Resilient Conference

America Resilient proposed key ways to mitigate the degree of likely human suffering, loss of biodiversity, and disruptions to critical societal systems by building resilience and mitigating the effects of climate change in the United States.

Leading civil and environmental engineer at West Virginia University identifies construction quality as potential contributor to Florida building collapse

Though a lot was not known immediately about the cause of the deadly collapse of a high-rise residential building in Surfside, Florida on June 24, Hota GangaRao, a civil and environmental engineering professor at West Virginia University’s Benjamin M. Statler…

World’s largest outdoor earthquake simulator undergoes major upgrade

A major upgrade to the world’s largest outdoor earthquake simulator reached a milestone mid-April when the facility’s floor–all 300,000 lbs of it–was put back into place. When completed this fall, the simulator will have the ability to reproduce multi-dimensional earthquake motions with unprecedented accuracy to make structures and their residents safer during strong shakes. Researchers lay out the details of the upgrade in a paper published recently in Frontiers in Built Environment.

Director of UCI Cybersecurity Policy & Research Institute available to address recent ransomware attacks.

As the first executive director of the multidisciplinary Cybersecurity Policy & Research Institute at the University of California, Irvine, Bryan Cunningham is focused on solution-oriented strategies to address technical, legal and policy challenges to combat cyber threats, protect individual privacy and civil…

Modern infrastructure security must be reframed with more thorough approach

Infrastructure has always been a target in warfare, according to Mikhail Chester, an associate professor of civil and environmental engineering at Arizona State University. “Think about military aircraft dropping bombs on bridges or railroad lines. But battles today are not just army…

Rural America primed for mileage if $2 trillion infrastructure plan passes

Rural communities help fuel the nation, though decades of aging and deteriorating infrastructure have stifled the potential of the American economy and way of life, according to West Virginia University experts. A proposed $2 trillion federal infrastructure plan, announced by…

Colonial Pipeline is a harbinger of things to come in business

Six days after the Colonial Pipeline was attacked by cyberhackers and left millions hanging at the gas pump, they have gained control of their operations once again. But not before the refinery paid their attackers $5 million in untraceable cryptocurrency, according to…

Colonial Pipeline hack a wake-up call to ramp up cybersecurity for nation’s infrastructure

The ransomware attack on the Colonial Pipeline, which has sparked fears of a gasoline shortage, exposes vulnerabilities within critical infrastructure systems in the U.S., according to a West Virginia University cybersecurity expert. Ransomware – a cyber attack designed to render files…